FAQ/Walkthrough by KeyBlade999

Version v2.70, Last Updated 2014-03-11

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Walkthrough (Continued)

Looker's Detective Agency - Chapter 5: A Fiery Woman and the Truth Revealed


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer NameMoney EarnedPokémon Party
Butler Chalmers$4,960Braviary Lv. 62
Pokémon Trainer Malva$12,600Pyroar Lv. 63
Scientist Sonia$4,820Elgyem Lv. 60, Klinklang Lv. 60
Scientist Ernst$4,748Weezing Lv. 61, Heliolisk Lv. 61
Lumiose Gang Member Sedna$4,960Mandibuzz Lv. 62
Lumiose Gang Member Eris$4,800Pangoro Lv. 60, Bouffalant Lv. 60
Scientist Justus$4,464Muk Lv. 62
Lumiose Gang Member Nix$4,880Druddigon Lv. 59, Krookodile Lv. 61
Pokémon Trainer Essentia$9,240Jellicent Lv. 64, Volcarona Lv. 66
$8,820Whimsicott Lv. 63, Mawile Lv. 63, Granbull Lv. 63
$9,240Persian Lv. 66
$9,800Crobat Lv. 68, Malamar Lv. 70

After that startling cutscene, head again onto a Boulevard to get a Holo Clip from Loo-- I mean, Emma. She wants you to come to the bureau. There, she finds out (when you tell her) that Looker is in the hospital before suddenly running off. Meanwhile, a different person enters, fire requesting a battle before actually getting to the business. You have been requested to go to Hotel Richissime's Royal Suite - Hotel Richissime is down the street in North Boulevard going clockwise, in a black building. The Royal Suite is at 5F; there, go south, west, and north into the room.

There, you'll find a member of the Elite Four, Malva, the Fire-type specialist. She will challenge you to a brief battle, but it's far from the difficulty her four normally would provide. After the battle, she begins talking about that "Essentia" you met and how it really is just Emma in an Expansion Suit. It's an article by Dr. Xerosic, once associated with Team Flare before you dowsed it thoroughly. She tells you he is in the Lysandre Café labs, but be ready to possibly die. O_o This game is rated "E"?

Anyways, Lysandre Café, as usual, can be reached through a taxicab. It's in an off-shoot alley from Magenta Plaza, the northwestern plaza of the city where a Pokémon Center lies. You'll meet Malva within. Follow her downstairs and you'll be given access to some secret floor: go along to it. As you enter, you'll be challenged to a Pokémon battle.

So, now then, another arrow tile puzzle. It's actually the same as the one from before. >_> The solution is altered at least, given what we're here to do. Use the nearby westbound tile, then go through the teleporter. On the other side, go into the teleporter, then go along the arrow tile. Once stopped, go northeast and beat the Scientist. Use the nearby eastbound arrow, then the southbound one. After stopping, go northeast without using the tiles until you can use the eastbound one. Use another eastbound one after and defeat the nearby gang member.

Use the western of the three southbound arrow tiles. When stopped, go west between but not on the tiles, then further along to a familiar mug. After the battle, go southwest and into the teleporter, then go north on the other side to another Scientist. Use the telporter afterwards, then go north and beat another familiar face. Once the battle's over with, go into the room beyond. Within are a number of treasures ... wait, those are other Trainers' Pokéballs!

Examine each of the bookshelves - every single step you can take along their south-facing shelves - and read all five volumes of the Expansion Suit. After, speak with Nix, whose shift then ends. Try leaving and someone barges in past you. This is Xerosic, and he summons Essentia to battle you in a four-battle series. The first three battles (six Pokémon total in a 2-3-1 distribution) are against the Pokémon you encountered in the back alleys, with a slightly high set of levels. The fourth is against two new Pokémon, insofar the strongest you've seen from in-game Trainers. Luckily, you do get to prepare between battles; speak with Looker before the fourth for a full healing. Plus, the Amulet Coin or Pure Incense might not be too bad an idea - you could earn $72,400 from these four battles!

Continue watching...



Looker's Detective Agency - Final Chapter: Here's Lookin' At You, Kid



After the scenes, head down to the North/South Boulevards again. As usual, you'll get a call through the Holo Caster; Emma wants you down at the bureau. There, Mimi arrives with a letter from Looker. After reading it, Emma runs off, trying to find him. Head to the Lumiose Art Museum first. There, you can go to the third floor and speak with the art director concerning where "the police officer" was heading. (You can also buy an audio guide to finally get a description of that new painting.) Once done, go back outside to learn more precisely where he's at - Lysandre Café. Go there...

So concludes pretty much anything I've noticed pertaining to the game's plotline. Congrats! You can battle Emma (as Essentia) in the Looker Bureau office on occasion now with her Crobat and Malamar as outlined previously - should be easy.



Legend Hunting: Zygarde




Zygarde is the final Pokémon of Kalos's legendary trio alongside Xerneas and Yveltal; although it doesn't have much mention, if any, in the plot, it could probably be elaborated on if Pokémon Z were to be made. (Hey, there's numerous support reasingons why this would make sense.)

We need to go to Terminus Cave: Fly to Couriway, then go north to Route 18. Use the upper entrance of Terminus Cave, next to the Inverse Battle house. Use the Terminus Cave walkthrough to go along to where the Reaper Cloth was found. The next area will soon lead to an area with six paths: along them you'll find Adamant Orb (southwest), Griseous Orb (northwest), Lustrous Orb (southeast), and a Big Nugget hidden at the end to the northeast. The first three are Generation IV items used to power-up Dialga, Giratina (and change this one's Forme!), and Palkia, though they can probably be used on any Pokémon to power up their Dragon- and Steel-/Ghost-/Water-type moves.

Anyways, to the far north is Zygarde!


SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #718 Zygarde
  • EV Yield: 3 HP
  • Hold Item: None

LevelLevel 70Move 1Crunch (Dark)
TypeDragon/GroundMove 2Earthquake (Ground)
Gender RatioGenderlessMove 3Camouflage (type change)
AbilitiesAura BreakMove 4Dragon Pulse (Dragon)

  • Zygarde: This Pokémon is weak to Ice (4x), plus Dragon and Fairy (x2). It is immune to Electric, as well. It resists Fire, Poison, and Rock. Its moves can be supereffective against Psychic, Ghost, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, Electric, and Dragon.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - short of trading, you'll be lucky to find this Pokémon again. The sure-shot method would be to use the Master Ball. However, the Master Ball is a one-time item (I think - it's rarely two in the series) that you'll want to save for more annoying Pokémon that just have to run away from you. Or at least more powerful Pokémon. I recommend either Zygarde or Mewtwo for the Master Ball.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later. Dusk Balls also work, since you're in a cavern.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)



Legend Hunting: Mewtwo




Our next Pokémon will be Mewtwo. Mewtwo is a pretty famous Pokémon, especially to veterans of the series and anime, due to his numerous appearances in the movies. Normally only having been found in the Unknown Dungeon northwest of Cerulean in Red/Green and their respective remakes after having been the only live-birth Pokémon (from Mew), he returns in Kalos in the Unknown Dungeon near the Pokémon Village.

Fly to Snowbelle City, then leave off to the south and through Route 20 as usual to the Pokémon Village. (See the linked-to walkthrough if you need help.) There, go to the far west side of the area via the southwestern ramp and get on the water. Surf northward and land on the terrain just at the base of the waterfall. Go east and into the now-unguarded cavern. Mewtwo is within.


SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #150 Mewtwo
  • EV Yield: 3 Special Attack
  • Hold Item: None, but Mewtonite X (Pokémon X) or Mewtwonite Y (Pokémon Y) can be found after

LevelLevel 70Move 1Recover (HP heal)
TypePsychicMove 2Psychic (Psychic)
Gender RatioGenderlessMove 3Barrier (raises Defenses)
AbilitiesPressure, UnnerveMove 4Aura Sphere (Psychic)

  • Mewtwo: As usual, Mewtwo is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug. It will resist Fighting and Psychic, and all else other than the named does normal damage. It has offensive advantages against Fighting and Poison, but those same Psychic moves don't affect Dark.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - short of trading, you'll be lucky to find this Pokémon again. The sure-shot method would be to use the Master Ball. However, the Master Ball is a one-time item (I think - it's rarely two in the series) that you'll want to save for more annoying Pokémon that just have to run away from you. Or at least more powerful Pokémon. I recommend either Zygarde or Mewtwo for the Master Ball.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later. Dusk Balls also work, since you're in a cavern.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)



Legend Hunting: Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos




There are other Generation I/III-remake legends available in Pokémon X/Y - the legendary birds Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos. Similarly to the legendary beasts in Pokémon Gold/Silver and their remakes, which you can get depends on your Kalos-region starter: Fennekin yields Zapdos, Chespin yields Articuno, and Froakie yields Moltres. They all rely on the same mechanics in this game.

The legendary will be randomly found at first: you won't really get to track it until you see it, after which it will be visible and traceable in the National Pokédex. It will go to random places and can be found by Surfing or walking through the grass and flowers. Each time you find it, unlike normal Roaming Pokémon, it will immediately fly away without a chance for you to respond in any fashion. After about 10 ~ 15 times seeing it, it will end up in the Sea Spirit's Den - it in the Azure Bay, which I detailed in the linked-to section.


SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #144 Articuno, #145 Zapdos, or #146 Moltres
  • Hold Item: None
  • EV Yield:
    • Articuno: 3 Special Defense
    • Zapdos: 3 Special Attack
    • Moltres: 3 Special Attack

#144 - ARTICUNO (Kalos starter is Chespin)
LevelLevel 70Move 1?
TypeIce/FlyingMove 2?
Gender RatioGenderlessMove 3?
AbilitiesPressureMove 4?
#145 - ZAPDOS (Kalos starter is Fennekin)
LevelLevel 70Move 1Light Screen (ups Special Defense)
TypeElectric/FlyingMove 2Rain Dance (boosts Water, weakens Fire, Thunder is no-miss)
Gender RatioGenderlessMove 3Discharge (Electric; hits all)
AbilitiesPressureMove 4Agility (ups Speed)
#144 - MOLTRES (Kalos starter is Froakie)
LevelLevel 70Move 1Safeguard (prevents ailments for 5 turns)
TypeFire/FlyingMove 2Air Slash (Flying)
Gender RatioGenderlessMove 3Heat Wave (Fire)
AbilitiesPressureMove 4Sunny Day (makes it Sunny)

  • Articuno: Articuno is doubly-weak to Rock, normally weak to Fire, Electric, and Steel, and immune to Ground. It will resist Grass and Bug. It has type-based advantages over Ground, Flying, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Zapdos: Zapdos is weak to Rock and Ice, and is immune to Ground. It resists Grass, Fighting, Flying, Bug, and Steel. It has type-based advantages over Flying, Water, Grass, and Fighting.

  • Moltres: Moltres is doubly-weak to Rock, normally weak to Electric and Water, and immune to Ground. It resists Grass (1/4), Bug (1/4), Fighting (1/2), Bug (1/2), and Steel (1/2). It has type-based advantages over Grass, Ice, Bug, Steel, and Fighting.

Am I the only one thinking of the battle music from Pokémon Red/Blue when it comes to this battle? =P

Obviously, you'll want to catch whichever guy you get - short of trading, you'll be lucky to find this Pokémon again. The sure-shot method would be to use the Master Ball. However, the Master Ball is a one-time item (I think - it's rarely two in the series) that you'll want to save for more annoying Pokémon that just have to run away from you. Or at least more powerful Pokémon. I recommend either Zygarde or Mewtwo for the Master Ball.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later. Dusk Balls also work, since you're in a cavern.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)




Pokémon-Amie: Basics and Rewards




Pokémon-Amie is probably the absolute cutest thing in Pokémon X/Y - maybe the entire series - to be devised. (And I am not intending that to be derogatory; I'm being rather serious.) It could even be one of the most beneficial aspects of Pokémon X/Y for your Pokémon, given what it could do to your battle strategy and whatever personal attachments you have to your Pokémon.

Pokémon-Amie is accessed similarly to the PSS and Super Training apps on the Touch Screen - simply press L/R to find it. There, you can tap on a Pokémon. If you opt to switch it out, you can see its various stats regarding Pokémon-Amie and the other Pokémon with which you may want to play. Once you want to play, do so!

Within the Pokémon-Amie interactive, you can do a number of things.


  • You can pet your Pokémon by rubbing them using the stylus and Touch Screen, which raises their affection. Keep in mind some Pokémon have areas they don't like to be rubbed on: for example, my Pikachu doesn't like being rubbed on his belly. It's generally individual to the Pokémon, I think. Some Pokémon have areas you outright shouldn't touch - people familiar with the anime can understand why you shouldn't touch Pikachu's cheeks, and general logic tells you not to rub the fiery tail of a Charmander. =P Other than that type of stuff, your Pokémon is pretty okay with anywhere else: just rub repeatedly and a number of hearts (or a music note) should appear. The implications of this are in the next section.

  • You can "make faces" with your Pokémon. Quite literally. This does require a pretty bright area (like, I needed to be in a well-windowed area in the daytime) and a clean inner 3DS/2DS camera. When a certain green face-like icon appears in the lower-left, you can play this little minigame. Basically, do what it tells you (wink this eye, tilt your head this way, open your mouth this much, etc.) and you can raise your Pokémon's affection! Keep also in mind that your face needs to be pretty recognizable - no hair in the face, probably no glasses, and so on, like you would do for general facial recognition stuff.

  • You can run your stylus along the Touch Screen in areas where nothing are - it's basically to mimic you waving your finger in random motions. It doesn't really raise affection, but the reaction's pretty cute for some Pokémon, especially if you high-five them. It doesn't work for all Pokémon, though.

  • Similarly, you can use the microphone to speak with your Pokémon. (The mic will take just about any random sound into account, though. Like I had set my 3DS down on my desk for a moment and rather loudly and accidentally banged my mouse against my cup and Pikachu recognized it.) It also doesn't really change anything.

  • You can feed your Pokémon PokéPuffs. PokéPuffs can be accessed via the top-left icon in the interactive. From there, you can grab a PokéPuff - if you don't like what you see, maybe you should scroll left (put the stylus in the middle of the selection area and swipe left). Each Pokémon has its own individual likes - it disregards species. There are several flavors of PokéPuffs - green are mint, orange are citrus, pink are sweet, light-brown are spicy, and dark-brown are mocha. There are also several degrees of effectiveness with each getting more powerful: basic, frosted, fancy, deluxe, and supreme. Respectively, they give the Pokémon one, two, three, four, and five hearts - see the following statistics section for the purpose of them. The better you do in minigames, generally the better the PokéPuff you get. Feeding Pokémon PokéPuffs boosts their Fullness and Affection.

  • You can also play minigames with them, discussed in later sections - basically, they raise Enjoyment and Affection, as well as lowering Fullness.

Phew!

Anyways, those are the basics of Pokémon-Amie. So, you may be asking why we should go through this? Well, as your Pokémon's affection rating goes up, a variety of things can happen - sometimes very beneficial things, as it were! Generally, if you see a heart or your Pokémon looks at you during battle, then, yeah, it was caused by Pokémon-Amie. Note that I have not seen the following effects occur in online competition, just the single-player experience.


  • Random in-battle dialogue changes to evoke emotional reactions from you. (i.e. "It looks like it's about to cry" may appear at low HP. ;_;)
  • You could pet the Pokémon after a battle if you rub the Touch Screen.
  • Your critical-hit ratio can be increased.
  • Your evasion rate can be increased.
  • The Pokémon may recover early from status ailments.
  • The EXP. earned can be boosted!
  • The Pokémon could survive attacks that would KO it!


Pokémon-Amie: Pokémon-Amie Statistics



There are three primary statistics in Pokémon-Amie.


  • Affection: By far the most important, this can help to determine the awards you get, detailed at the end of the previous section. It is raised by petting Pokémon, playing Make Faces with them, playing minigames, and feeding Pokémon PokéPuffs. It maxes at five hearts. This stat is completely independent of the Pokémon's actual Happiness stat!

  • Fullness: This determines how many PokéPuffs your Pokémon can eat: there's a general "1 PokéPuff, 1 unit" correspondence here. If the Pokémon begins to eat slower or even just ignore the food, then the Pokémon is getting fuller. In other words, it's a long and tedious process to raise Affection by just eating - the quickest way to a Pokémon's heart is not through it's stomach. =) Anyways, this is lowered by playing minigames.

  • Enjoyment: Simply put, it denotes how often you play minigames: the more music notes, the more you've played minigames with it recently. It also increases as battles are done in the field involving the Pokémon in question.

Specifically regarding Affection, it is denoted by how hearts a Pokémon has given off when you've done various activities with it.


AffectionHearts Given Off
0 Hearts0
1 Heart1 ~ 49
2 Hearts50 ~ 99
3 Hearts100 ~ 149
4 Hearts150 ~ 249
5 Hearts250+


Pokémon-Amie: Minigames: Berry Picker



This particular minigame is the leftmost of those given to you. Like all the others, there are several difficulties: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Unlimited. As the difficulty increases, your Pokémon get more demanding faster and you'll have more Berries to contend with.

The goal is to tap and drag the Berries on the Touch Screen to the Pokémon requesting them: you've probably played a minigame like this if you've played Mario Party DS. The Berry the Pokémon wants is in the little thought bubble next to it - drag the Berry into the thought bubble and the Pokémon will go off, giving you a point. If you do it fast enough, you'll get additional points, denoted by an orange note in lieu of a yellow one. Most of the difficulties are timed except Unlimited - in that difficulty, you are to get as many Berries done as possible, as the difficulty slowly racks up, up to the point that you fail to give the Pokémon a Berry fast enough or the proper Berry three times.

As for some tips... When the Pokémon begin to come in groups, try to set up a bit of a method of going to them rather than hectically spotting Pokémon needing a Berry. I, for example, tend to go sequential, generally left to right. If you spot Pokémon popping up out of sync, go for whoever came up first. And generally try to familiar yourself with the position of the Berries as you go: if you can do that, then you just need to look at the Pokémon for who wants what.



Pokémon-Amie: Minigames: Head It



This particular minigame is the leftmost of those given to you. Like all the others, there are several difficulties: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Unlimited. As the difficulty increases, you generally have to deal with multiple Pokémon more often, have more complex series of yarn balls to contend with, and the balls obviously will vary in speed more.

The concept of this minigame is to make the Pokémon bounce back balls of yarn using their heads. Tap the Pokémon and it'll bounce back the ball of yarn. Doing so normally earns you one point, but you can earn three if you bounce it back at the right time. Continually hitting the ball in sequence is good as well and gives a combo - starting around 10~15 hits, regardless of the "right time" bonus, you'll also get a "FEVER" double bonus: that means you could get up to six hits! Your combo breaks, though, if you miss the yarn or fail to hit it. As time goes on, more and more Pokémon come to play, and the yarn balls increase in quantity, speed, and variety of speeds. At the end, you can hit an extra large yarn ball for bonus points - however, you don't get that in Unlimited mode, since it is not timed and just ends upon missing three balls of yarn.

As for some tips? Well... A lot of the time, there's actually a rhythmic pattern to the balls dropping, despite it being on one or three Pokémon, so you can use that to your advantage. However, when doing so, listen for "out of place" sounds, like a low-pitched whistle, to indicate a yarn ball is going to fall at a different-than-normal speed. That's actually the main thing to note here.



Pokémon-Amie: Minigames: Tile Puzzle



This particular minigame is the leftmost of those given to you. Like all the others, there are several difficulties: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Unlimited. As the difficulty increases, each puzzle will have more pieces to contend with.

The Tile Puzzle minigames are debatedly the hardest of the three to go for. In these puzzles, you need to tap two tiles of the puzzle to switch them around: if they fit in their proper positions, then they'll stick there and lose their dashed cyan border. You need to get them all to fit as quickly as possible. Normally, this would seem simple if it weren't for the pictures actually being dynamic: they can move around and change quite suddenly to throw you off! In Unlimited mode, you will go through the puzzles sequentially with a time limit imposed: you gain more time for correctly moving pieces and for completing puzzles, with the game ending when time runs out.

And tips? Well, first start with the corner pieces - unlike the more recent tradition of puzzles from the Mario & Luigi RPG series, the pieces are not rotated, so they look as they should. You can look at the colored border around the tile to get an idea of where it fits. From there, go for the edge pieces - remember that the edges will have their colors blend about halfway between the corner pieces. And from there, you're mostly on your own with the central pieces.


Super Training: The Basics




One of the newest additions to the Pokémon formula is that of Super Training. Super Training is accessible by pressing L or R and navigating through the Touch Screen. There, the lower-left icon, the soccer ball, allows you to progress into the training. Throughout training and at regular intervals, you'll also receive some punching bags, accessible in the lower-right corner, that help you to increase your stats.

The premise of Super Training is more in-depth than you might think. It is far some simply the increasing of your stats, but your EVs, which in turn boost your stats. Confused? See Super Training: EVs Explained & EV Increases for more. EVs were normally a completely hidden value in Pokémon - only accessible through hacking, once revealed, it allowed people to intensely and accurately train their Pokémon to precise statistic levels: EVs are one of the reasons, along with IVs and Nature, why two Pokémon of the same species, level, gender, and abilities rarely have the exact same stats.

When Super Training, your general goal is to shoot the white-colored goals you will see on the Pokémon Balloon, also on-screen. Doing so will earn you points (see the lower-right corner of the nearby screenshot). Most of these balloons will also fire HUGE soccer balls back at you. Getting hit, of course, makes you lose points: typically 50 - 400.

For the in-depth controls? Well, needless to say, you're pretty screwed if you're a leftie -- sorry. Use the Circle Pad to maneuver your Pokémon - you can move him/her/it within a limited range up, down, left, and right, and you can do diagonally. You can tap the Touch Screen to launch a ball with very little power. However, if you tap and hold the stylus on the Touch Screen, you build up power: additionally, a targeting cursor will appear on-screen to let you aim precisely! The more power you build, the more powerful your shots. If you need to block a soccer ball, use the L Button.

In-depth strategy? Eh, there isn't much beyond practice: each time I played, I beat the course's proposed "record" time on either my first, or rarely my second try. Just use your power shots a lot and try to predict the movement of the goals (or fire wildly). Some Pokémon Balloons also make barriers appear that tend to block shots: a yellow cursor goes along these, which you can hit with a power shot to destroy the barrier. Hitting a lot of the white goals (they disappear after one hit) will also let you spawn a red one, which you can hit multiple times for lots of points - I often get high above the Pokémon and just rapidly touch the Touch Screen.

Each Pokémon also has a different ball type. Some Pokémon shoot green balls, which aren't special. Some shoot blue ones that are extra powerful. Others shoot yellow ones that are extra fast and basically allow rapid-fire. Finally, some shoot the strong, yet slow, orange ones. Look at the icon in the top-right of the Touch Screen to learn which.



POKÉRUS

There is a particularly rare status - the odds of finding it being 3 in 65,536, which is about 1 in 20,000 or about 0.004578% - known as Pokérus, abbreviated as PKRS in previous games. Pokérus is a somewhat useful status in that, once caught, the Pokémon in question will always have its EV earnings doubled: where someone normally gets 1, it gets 2, for example. This lasts for the time you get the status until you end up losing the Pokémon for some reason. The Pokémon can also be put in the party alongside other Pokémon for around 24 hours after catching the virus to infect other Pokémon with it - once contracted, they get a full 24-hour contagion time and lifetime EV doubling.

This status can be denoted on the status screen and, initially, by speaking with a nurse in a Pokémon Center. It cannot be cured by any means other than waiting it out, and the Pokémon will be able to still get KO'd and Paralyzed and whatnot in battle. If the Pokémon is deposited into the PC or GTS, the countdown basically freezes. Once the status wears off, a small pink smiley face is found next to the Pokémon's markings on the status screen: this only marks that the contagion period is over, and, again, EV doubling is permanent.

I note this special status most prominently here because Pokérus does not have any effect on what happens in Super Training. Ultimately, Pokérus just quickens EV training, and has no use to the common player beyond that. It doesn't truly increase stats, just their growth, which plateaus earlier than normal.



Before accessing Super Training, you'll see a graph like that to the right. This graph represents two things: in green, the Pokémon's base-level stats for it's level and IVs. In yellow, you see its stats with the EVs in each stat applied. But what are "EVs"? Well, first, the game lamely (and inaccurately) calls them base stats. (Trust me, it'd be ridiculous if 12 Special Attack was applied for one two-minute game or something.)

EVs, or Effort Values, are semi-hidden stats. (I say semi-hidden because they were completely hidden in previous games and are only shown by the little graph here with no numerical representation given unless you do some Super Training, or save-and-reset when using a Reset Bag.) They are used to determine stat growth, and are earned through Super Training and through Pokémon battles. Each Pokémon will give off a set amount of EVs to the Pokémon, which can actually be shared through the Exp. Share. EVs can also be boosted by several EV-Boosting Items, and also lowered by some Berries - similar effects can be emulated through the Lumiose Juice Shoppe.

So, with that in mind, it is extremely important to note that EVs can be maxed out. There are six stats - HP, Attack, Defense, Special Attack, Special Defense, and Speed - to which EVs are applied. In any lone stat, you can have as many 252 EVs (255 in previous games, but they're irrelevant after 252 for reasons to be mentioned later). Overall, you can have a total 510 EVs across all six stats - that means only two stats can be truly maxed at any given time. If you want a look at the total EV count, look at the bar to the right of the EV stat chart. Plus, you can get an Effort Ribbon with full EVs, and you unlock Secret Super Training at 510 EVs.

How are EVs calculated with regards to stat increases? Well, the mechanics seem to have remained the same as in previous games: the total of EVs, divided by four then truncated, multiplied by your level divided by 100 equals to the total gain over the basal value. Or, in other terms:

 TOTAL STAT VALUE = ((Base Stat) + (EV Gain) + (IV Gain)) × (Nature Gain)

          EV GAIN = (EVs ÷ 4) × (Level ÷ 100)
          IV GAIN = (IVs)     × (Level ÷ 100)
      NATURE GAIN = ×1.1 if favorable, ×0.9 if not, ×1.0 if neither

Note that the function, "(EVs ÷ 4)", is truncated: that is to say, it is rounded down. For example, the highest amount of EVs allowed in one stat was once 255. (This is now 252, not like in previous generations - veterans, be SURE to note that!) That means, at Level 100, you should get 63.75 points due to EVs. However, because it is truncated (basically the decimal values are chopped off), you gain only 63 points. Thusly, EV trainers keep strict track of EVs because that means those looking for max stats could be wasting 6 EVs in maxing two stats: you could let them go to other stats for a single-point boost. Hey, it's something...

There are a number of hold items, also, that change the EV earnings beyond those already mentioned.


HOLD ITEMEFFECT
Macho BraceDoubles EV growth, but lowers Speed
Power AnkletDoubles the EV growth of Speed, but lowers Speed
Power BandDoubles the EV growth of Special Defense, but lowers Speed
Power BeltDoubles the EV growth of Defense, but lowers Speed
Power BracerDoubles the EV growth of Attack, but lowers Speed
Power LensDoubles the EV growth of Special Attack, but lowers Speed
Power WeightDoubles the EV growth of HP, but lowers Speed


Super Training: The Courses



Here, I will briefly detail each course. For the most part, there is no particular strategy, though, beyond aiming at the goals and going wild while blocking incoming shots. So I will simply give numerical data: EV increases and the like.

Courses are unlocked by levels. First you'll play Level 1 courses, then Level 2, and so on. After meeting a special condition, you will unlock the slightly different Secret Super Training, detailed further down.


LevelNameBase EV BoostsTime to Beat
1Hone Sp. Atk with Magnemite!Special Attack +430 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1Raise Your HP with Wailmer!Max HP +430 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1Boost Attack with Axew!Attack +430 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1Buld Up Sp. Def with Tentacool!Special Defense +430 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1Speed Up with the Noibat Regimen!Speed +430 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1Strengthen Defense with Geodude!Defense +430 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
2Home In on Magneton!Special Attack +81 minute (2 minutes left)
2Hit Relicanth's Weak Points!Max HP +81 minute (2 minutes left)
2Let Loose to Get Fraxure!Attack +81 minute (2 minutes left)
2Watch Out for Tentacruel's Bitbots!Special Defense +81 minute (2 minutes left)
2Hammer Aerodactyl with High-Speed Shots!Speed +81 minute (2 minutes left)
2Break Down Graveler's Barrier!Defense +81 minute (2 minutes left)
3Skahe Off That Uncanny Magnezone!Special Attack +121 minute (2 minutes left)
3Shoot Back! Get the Giant Wailord!Max HP +121 minute (2 minutes left)
3Catch 'Em! Haxorus's Furious Attacks!Attack +121 minute (2 minutes left)
3Kick Out! Get the Dragalge Corps!Special Defense +121 minute (2 minutes left)
3Catch It! Noivern's Wild Wind!Speed +121 minute (2 minutes left)
3Break It! Golem's Defensive LineDefense +121 minute (2 minutes left)

After having given a Pokémon 510 EVs - it doesn't have to all be in Super Training, or any - you can also do some extra Super Secret Training courses. While they won't provide any increases to your EVs (remember, max-EV Pokémon), they do provide items, especially if you do good!

Note that the "Time to Beat" stats here account for the occasional need to beat multiple balloons, and thusly the slight time boost given to you.


LevelNameTime to BeatNotable Rewards
4The Troubles Keep On Coming?!2 minutes (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Wing EV-Boosting Items
5The Leaf Stone Cup Begins!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Leaf Stone
5The Fire Stone Cup Begins!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Fire Stone
5The Water Stone Cup Begins!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Water Stone
5Follow Those Fleeing Goals!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Thunder Stone
6Watch Out! That's One Tricky Second Half!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Dusk Stone
6An Opening of Lightning-Quick Attacks!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Shiny Stone
6Those Long Shots Are No Long Shot!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Dawn Stone
7Scatterbug Lugs Back!2 minutes (2 minutes left)Wing EV-Boosting Items
7A Barrage of Bitbots!1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Wing EV-Boosting Items
7Drag Down Hydreigon!2 minutes (2 minutes left)Sun/Moon Stone
8The Battle for the Best: Version X/Y3 minutes (1 minute, 30 seconds left)Any of the above stones!


Super Training: The Training Bags



After finishing Super Training sessions, as well as just at random in the field, you can gather Training Bags. These can be used via the lower-right icon in the Super Training menu before starting a session. There are multiple types: the effects vary, each can be used only once, and you can have twelve individual bags at once. Once activated, the Bag appears next to the Pokémon on the Touch Screen - they will beat it up at one hit per minute, or you can tap it to make them hit it, whichever suits what you're doing at the time. Below are the Training Bags and their effects.


Training BagEffect
Attack Bag LBoosts Attack EVs by 12
Attack Bag MBoosts Attack EVs by 4
Attack Bag SBoosts Attack EVs by 1
Big-Shot BagMakes you more likely to hit goals when next playing Super Training
Defense Bag LBoosts Defense EVs by 12
Defense Bag MBoosts Defense EVs by 4
Defense Bag SBoosts Defense EVs by 1
Double-Up BagDoubles the EV gains from the next Super Training session (+8/+16/+24)
HP Bag LBoosts Max HP EVs by 12
HP Bag MBoosts Max HP EVs by 4
HP Bag SBoosts Max HP EVs by 1
Reset BagReduces all of the Pokémon's EVs to zero
Soothing BagIncreases the Pokémon's Happiness
Sp. Atk. Bag LBoosts Special Attack EVs by 12
Sp. Atk. Bag MBoosts Special Attack EVs by 4
Sp. Atk. Bag SBoosts Special Attack EVs by 1
Sp. Def. Bag LBoosts Special Defense EVs by 12
Sp. Def. Bag MBoosts Special Defense EVs by 4
Sp. Def. Bag SBoosts Special Defense EVs by 1
Swiftness BagMakes the Pokémon move faster when next playing Super Training
Speed Bag LBoosts Speed EVs by 12
Speed Bag MBoosts Speed EVs by 4
Speed Bag SBoosts Speed EVs by 1
Team Flare BagAfter using this, until the "happy face" on the Pokémon goes away, hitting the normal black bag makes it more likely to find other Super Training bags
Toughen-Up BagReduces the points lost when hit in your next Super Training session

Sectional Flowchart



On a general level, if you want to produce a "Pokémon Breeding Process", please take note that it must actually result in something special. Having 31 IVs in all six stats is special. Having them in one, not so much. Somehow raising the chances of finding a Shiny? That's special. Raising the chances of getting a "crap" Pokémon? Not really. If you want to submit something, see the Legalities section.





Pokémon Breeding: A Primer



To consider what Pokémon breeding is, we must consider how animals reproduce. On the superficial level, it generally requires a male and a female: such holds true here for the most part. Unlike normal, though, Pokémon typically lay Eggs to bear baby Pokémon. (The only exception is the canon surrounding the live birth of Mewtwo from Mew, given in the Kanto-region games.) Normally, Pokémon breeding is more than simply about getting lower-evolution Pokémon or spawning massive numbers of starters: in fact, it is the most certain way to guarantee that your Pokémon can get the most ideal stats and movesets possible! However, this particular primer is designed for Pokémon beginners - if you want to get into the gnitty-gritty of things, the other sections will sate you.

As you progress through the game, you'll eventually hit Route 7. After some events there and at the Parfum Palace, you'll be allowed to reach the majority of the route past that big bridge. Just beyond said bridge is the Pokémon Daycare. There, you can leave two Pokémon and they'll stay there. Typically, beginners just leave Pokémon there for the purposes of leveling up: they'll earn 1 EXP. per step you take. You can get the Pokémon back at a base cost $100, plus an additional $100 per level earned. You, however, cannot dictate how moves are learned or deleted, and level-up evolutions do not occur, so look out!

Now, Pokémon breeding... Obviously, you'll need two Pokémon: one a male, and one a female. (The little mark that appears beside their name in battle represents that: the blue arrow is male, the pink cross is female. No mark means the Pokémon has no gender and generally cannot breed.) There are blatant exceptions to this rule, but more on that momentarily. When you leave two Pokémon there of opposite genders (or other situations), there is a chance that you can speak with the man outside the Daycare to receive an Egg.

The Pokémon within the Egg can inherit a number of things, depending upon certain conditions - these include IVs (which influence stat growth), Nature (which can give a 10% bonus/loss to some stats), moves (but only some!), and species. If you're playing one of the older games, you can execute a glitch known as the "Pomeg Berry Glitch" (see the game's Cheat page on GameFAQs - only Generations III & IV) to know this stuff for the most part. However, Pokémon X/Y obviously prevent that. Nice bit of trivia nonetheless.

So, we come down to it - how to make the Egg hatch? The Egg hatches by carrying it in your party and walking/biking/skating around. Eggs can hatch in anywhere from 5,000 to 31,000 steps (obviously I'm being inspecific), depending on the species within the Egg. It's just walking, so beginners don't really need to worry. Eventually, the Egg will hatch. This process can be sped up by having Pokémon with the Magma Armor or Flame Body abilities.

That's the gist of it. But if you want to manipulate this in a more beneficial way, read on...



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