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How big is anime in japan?

#31mtjormitchPosted 5/13/2013 12:06:36 AM
Newuser posted...
sailorpete posted...
laharl12345 posted...
So lets say someone who goes out allot and gets good grades but tends to casually watch anime but not much else.

Would you still be looked down upon, or is it only the overly obsessive otaku crowd who are obsessed with moe and stuff of that nature.


If you don't rub it in people faces like elsewhere I feel you won't be looked down on.


The way the Japanese society works is even reading manga and playing video games is considered acceptable only up till a certain age. If you are doing that after leaving college people are going to be looking at you as a weirdo and doing something unhealthy. And the stigma attached to anime Otakus is far worse than that attached to manga/video game fans.


To anyone wanting to know more. Watch some of that otaku no video or what ever it is called. It is quite literally reefer madness in anime fan form. I crap you all not.

Honestly. Sounds like a crapton of people over there really aren't that mature. Doesn't matter if you like something or not because if it is animated or not. I mean, honestly. You would have to be a grade A moron to think that way. I mean, look at Simpsons or Family guy. People watch them, Adults even. Heck, just go to a comic con and you can see a crapton of fans for everything, from little kids to old people. To be quite honest. Anyone that hates something without understanding it or even seeing it is about as good as a WBC member. Totally ignorant and hates things just to hate.

I mean, I hate naruto myself. But that is because I just don't like it. Same with me really hating Prince of Persia video game series, The Walking Dead TV show, or even the movie Knowing... ugh... terrible movie IMO.

Doesn't matter if it is animated or not. A good show is a good show. Plain and simple.
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#32laharl12345(Topic Creator)Posted 5/13/2013 12:29:23 AM
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Truth, however I thought animation being lame was only the stigma of western society, I'm just shocked the eastern world is just as immature.
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#33TaquishaJohnsonPosted 5/13/2013 12:30:18 AM
There are two kinds of anime: Anime for kids and anime for perverts.
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#34reptyle101Posted 5/13/2013 12:30:46 AM
I don't know about those two series in particular but classic long running shounen manga is decently accepted, at least as a guilty pleasure. I remember there being a Jump reader stats and quite a few were normal adult men that read it on the train to work and such.
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#35NewuserPosted 5/13/2013 12:44:54 AM
mtjormitch posted...
Honestly. Sounds like a crapton of people over there really aren't that mature.


Think someone who worked as a teacher in Japan has mentioned before in OT, the society there is ridiculously conservative and there's tremendous pressure on you to conform to the expected behaviour. Male students are expected to join sports clubs and those who joined culture clubs are looked down upon as being not-so-manly. Then he knows of a friend who's child was getting bullied simply because he spent a few years living outside Japan, even though he's 100% Japanese. He knows of some who went overseas, came back and struggled to adapt to life back in Japan because their experience overseas was an eye-opener.
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#36UNdeadgamEr290Posted 5/13/2013 1:17:13 AM(edited)
From: Newuser | #035
mtjormitch posted...
Honestly. Sounds like a crapton of people over there really aren't that mature.


Think someone who worked as a teacher in Japan has mentioned before in OT, the society there is ridiculously conservative and there's tremendous pressure on you to conform to the expected behaviour. Male students are expected to join sports clubs and those who joined culture clubs are looked down upon as being not-so-manly. Then he knows of a friend who's child was getting bullied simply because he spent a few years living outside Japan, even though he's 100% Japanese. He knows of some who went overseas, came back and struggled to adapt to life back in Japan because their experience overseas was an eye-opener.


Culture club members don't really get looked down upon. There's just a huge divide between the two. You will rarely see sports club members hanging out or having friends from the culture clubs. However, most boys do look forward to sports rather than culture.

You are right about the bullying. There's a japanese saying: "Deru kugi ha utareru" which means "the nail that sticks out gets hammered down". Every Japanese person must conform to the rules established in society, and your seniors will always have authority over you. Those who disobey the rules or their seniors will be ostracized by the rest of society. Even the teachers turn a blind eye to it because it's something they have gone through, both the bullied and the bullying, and simply believe it to be a way of life.
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#37AwasaiPosted 5/13/2013 3:22:35 AM(edited)
I've lived here for two years.
It's really not that big.

One Piece is extraordinarily big (you're guaranteed to find One Piece merchandise in supermarkets, clothing stores, convenient stores, toy stores, stationary stores) and pretty much everybody under 30 has read/watched some or all of it. In any given parking lot, I can usually look around for a few seconds and find a car with One Piece related decorations on the windows or dashboard.

But everything else? Not really. It's mostly a thing for kids or the looked-down-upon otaku niche. There are two or three "anime" channels on TV; comparable to the number of channels dedicated to cartoons in the West. I initially thought that anime would have more of a place in the culture here, but most of my middle school students know very little of even the shonen "classics" from decades past (they're surprisingly unfamiliar with DBZ, Hokuto no Ken, Death Note, Jojo- although some are getting into Jojo for the first time now because of the 2012 anime). In movie theaters, you're pretty much guaranteed to have a single anime movie running at any given time, but it's usually directed at kids (pokemon, anpanman, magical girl, shin chan, conan, etc.).

The average adult who I meet will admit to having been a fan of shonen as a kid, and they often follow a series or two now, very casually (usually One Piece, and usually just via the volumes. Not week-to-week). The main patrons of places like Akihabara are, as expected, fat neckbeards. That's just how it is. Hiding one's power level is just as important here, it seems.

EDIT: Just read the above posts. Definitely, for sure, on the deru kui wa utareru thing. But honestly my culture club boys are looked down upon. Other teachers in the staff room even make fun of them behind their backs. Well, when I say "culture clubs" I mean "art club," because there's only one boy in the brass band and he's the drummer, which makes him cool. The whole club activities system is one of my major gripes with schools here. It's an awful waste of time (until 7 or 8 on weeknights, and at least half a day on weekends) designed to inspire precisely the groupthink that is so essential to Japanese society, which only succeeds in eliminating the possibility of the kids developing any other interests because they don't have time to do anything. Most don't even study adequately and come to school dead tired, but that's alright because grades don't matter (I've had two students who I NEVER MET ONCE because they never came to school; they both received diplomas on graduation day. One asked me to sign his yearbook. I wrote "Nice to meet you!").
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#38laharl12345(Topic Creator)Posted 5/13/2013 3:21:29 AM
Awasai posted...
I've lived here for two years.
It's really not that big.

One Piece is extraordinarily big (you're guaranteed to find One Piece merchandise in supermarkets, clothing stores, convenient stores, toy stores, stationary stores) and pretty much everybody under 30 has read/watched some or all of it. In any given parking lot, I can usually look around for a few seconds and find a car with One Piece related decorations on the windows or dashboard.

But everything else? Not really. It's mostly a thing for kids or the looked-down-upon otaku niche. There are two or three "anime" channels on TV; comparable to the number of channels dedicated to cartoons in the West. I initially thought that anime would have more of a place in the culture here, but most of my middle school students know very little of even the shonen "classics" from decades past (they're surprisingly unfamiliar with DBZ, Hokuto no Ken, Death Note, Jojo- although some are getting into Jojo for the first time now because of the 2012 anime). In movie theaters, you're pretty much guaranteed to have a single anime movie running at any given time, but it's usually directed at kids (pokemon, anpanman, magical girl, shin chan, conan, etc.).

The average adult who I meet will admit to having been a fan of shonen as a kid, and they often follow a series or two now, very casually (usually One Piece, and usually just via the volumes. Not week-to-week). The main patrons of places like Akihabara are, as expected, fat neckbeards. That's just how it is. Hiding one's power level is just as important here, it seems.


That's pretty frikken disappointing.
Has it always been like this?
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#39Itachi157Posted 5/13/2013 3:32:14 AM(edited)
From: Awasai | #037
I've lived here for two years.
It's really not that big.


I was over there a month. Nothing compared to two years, but I had some time to experience day to day life there.

Awasai's experiences were pretty similar to mine. While over there, I saw absolutely zero anime related things in public and such, other than One Piece and anime that looked targeted toward really little kids.

Flipping through the channels on TV, it's pretty much just live action Japanese shows, subtitled American/foreign programs, and subtitled American/foreign movies. They actually air a ton of stuff in English that's subbed in Japanese.The only anime I ever saw on TV during the day was some rerun of an Inuyasha episode.

To see the kind of anime we discuss on here, you have to stay up until like 3 AM. and it is mostly considered to be for neckbeards.

Another funny thing that happened is that one time I went to a meeting of an organization that my host family was involved in. It was like a charity organization. They were having a blood drive, and the poster for the blood drive had some weird anime moe vampire nurse or something on it. It really made the members of the organization uncomfortable and they looked reluctant to even touch the posters.
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#40laharl12345(Topic Creator)Posted 5/13/2013 3:31:51 AM
Man Bakuman must have portrayed high school life extremely wrong then.
Mashiro and Takagi seemed to love manga and their 2 love interests didn't seem to think it was that strange.
Could it be that when the manga artists of those shows were younger that's how it used to be?
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