Games with tunnel vision gameplay?

#31GwendalPosted 5/5/2012 4:31:44 PM
And yes, I will most definitely be avoiding fetch quests ...at least until a competent guide appears to tell me what super items come from which seemingly pointless quests.

The problem is that you get the best rewards by trading in the "stamps" you get on your special card by doing fetch quests, instead of directly from a particular quests. I pretty much got sick of them after the first town and never bothered with all the hassle of running all those errands after that.
---
Currently playing:
Ni no Kuni (PS3), Catherine (PS3), Icewind Dale (PC)
#32alt_reality(Topic Creator)Posted 5/5/2012 11:08:07 PM
The problem is that you get the best rewards by trading in the "stamps" you get on your special card by doing fetch quests, instead of directly from a particular quests. I pretty much got sick of them after the first town and never bothered with all the hassle of running all those errands after that.

Well that's disappointing. And its on PS3 so I don't have a cheat device available to say %$#@ that. Provided the game is easy enough, I probably won't need any sidequest rewards and even if I do, I think my time is valuable enough to not spend it running errands for lazy pixelated dbags. My first run in most any RPG is done blind unless I'm really stuck and I tend to avoid stupid fetch quests like the ones of which you speak. Maybe in a few months or a year after playing will I get gungho about doing all the side BS.
---
"We running out of time!" Sigurd, Typogears
#33CloudslashPosted 5/6/2012 1:55:42 AM
Wow... it actually makes me kinda happy to see that there are other people who actually LIKE linear gameplay. I was practically raised on left-to-right, no exploration, no frills games like Mario, Castlevania (i.e. before SotN happened), Contra, Gradius/Life Force, Ninja Gaiden, Double Dragon, Final Fight, etc. etc. etc., so I never really understood all the love for open world games. That and to me it always felt like nonlinear games were that way just so the developers could get you stuck not knowing where to go easily, and then they could either make money off of the strategy guides (i.e. before the internet happened), or at least claim the game was much longer than it really was. Seriously, I would never have gotten anywhere in Zelda or Metroid if someone hadn't shown me that you could destroy walls, because at least in their NES incarnations, there was ZERO in-game indication that you could do so in either game.

With linear games, there's no BS. Your objective is always clear... move forward, stay alive, and kill whatever you have to. And I HATE that argument that RPGs always had to have open worlds to make up for the combat being turn-based instead of real-time twitch-based like everything else. This topic alone is proof that there's plenty of good, linear, turn-based RPGs out there, and even WRPGs kept using turn-based combat well after games like Zelda and Secret of Mana showed us open worlds with real-time combat (and Bioware at least still uses real-time pause to this day, for which I am very thankful). Turn-based combat is it's own completely valid method of gameplay, and if you don't like it, go play every other genre in existence.
---
"Might go somewhere sunny. Sit on beach, look at ocean, collect seashells. ...Might run tests on seashells." Mordin Solus
#34saint35Posted 5/6/2012 2:34:22 AM
I'm fine with both linear and non linear games. Although, non linear games worry me when I play them if I may end up lost if the game does a poor job of providing adequate hints on what to do/where to go. Regarding exploration though, it's incredibly simple to make it worthwhile in a RPG. In every area, have chests with better equipment or good/rare items. I personally think, opening a chest in a dungeon and getting better equipment is one of the most satisfying things in a RPG.
---
PSN ID: The_Last_Fencer
just play it and form your own damn opinion - Lost7th
#35MegidolaonPosted 5/6/2012 3:58:08 AM
I'm fine with both linear and non linear games. Although, non linear games worry me when I play them if I may end up lost if the game does a poor job of providing adequate hints on what to do/where to go.
Yeah, that's always annoying and a waste of time.
Exploration can be real nice, but it sucks if you take forever to get to the next place where you can do anything and especially where you can continue the main plot.
Looking at YOU Wild Arms 3.
---
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIjVvnO5lgM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=4qp0wv7cDUA#t=22s