Help bring Bravely Default (RPG - 3DS- Square) to US/Europe

#51loosingENDS(Topic Creator)Posted 1/6/2013 8:44:00 PM
Amenonuhoko posted...
I would sign the petition, but I don't want to give them my address.
E-mail should be sufficient.

I truly do hope that it makes it.
The footage looks great and the 3DS could use more RPGs
Besides, I've seen too many great RPGs not cross the Pacific over the years; I don't want to see another.

But I am inclined to believe that it will make it.


Cant you leave the address blank ?

Or just use a random one
#52KingLawnmowerPosted 1/7/2013 1:47:56 PM
SIgned with my real address. I've said for a while that either this game, or Dragon Quest VII will make me a 3DS owner.
#53MottmanPosted 1/7/2013 2:15:30 PM
I almost never post here, but I have something I really want to say.

Personally, I think the idea that many games don't get released in certain regions is nonsense, even moreso now thanks to region-locked gaming systems. This board can say whatever it wants about Xenoblade, I bought it because of the hype that had surrounded its potential release, to see if it could be as enjoyable as the claims indicated, and I ended up enjoying the game immensely, it was one of my favorite games in recent years. And the vast majority of North American reviewers and gamers seem to agree; as despite a limited release, the game has done better than expected in sales compared to other Nintendo recent releases from less-known franchises (Like Sin and Punishment 2).

The point is, as someone who will import a game on a region-free system but refuses to mess with a region-locked system by "modding" it, Nintendo of America's short-sighted decision to almost not release this would have cost many gamers a chance to play a highly enjoyable game. Even if I don't end up liking a game, I think I should at least have the freedom to play it without resorting to potentially less-than-legal means. I also bought Last Story to see if it would also be worth the hype; but that one I ended up not liking, and so I sold it. But I still appreciate XSeed's willingness to being the game here, because I'm sure there were many gamers who did like it. Not liking the game does NOT change my opinion that it should have come to all regions, and I applaud XSeed for stepping in where Nintendo of America failed.

To bring this back around to the original game mentioned in this topic, whether this "Bravely Default" ends up being a "good" game in your view and in my view or not, I fully support its being released in all regions. Few things in the video gaming industry tick me off more than being refused the ability to play a video game that looks entertaining and that I want to play without modding my system to accommodate it. Unless a game absolutely flat-out bombs in sales and would be a financial disaster to release (which was not the case with Xenoblade, Last Story, or Bravely Default) I think games should not be limited to certain regions, especially now that simply importing region-free is out of the question on most modern systems. People are free to like or dislike whatever games they want, but I will never be sorry that even a game I didn't like was given a chance to be released in my country; because odds are very good that many others people will like the game, and I'd rather have the option to play it than not.
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My name is Mottman, and I approve this message.
"Champions don't whine, they win!" - Vangarre from Xenoblade Chronicles
#54JunpeiIoriPosted 1/8/2013 7:50:55 AM
Mottman posted...
I almost never post here, but I have something I really want to say.

Stuff


In a perfect world, that would be wonderful. However, the video game industry is a business and the stuff you're suggesting requires money.

It takes money to localize a game, because we all don't speak the same language. You also have licensing fees, because it may be licensed in one country but that doesn't mean you get a free ride in another. Then you have manufacturing costs. Then you have shipping costs.

Suddenly, a game you already have MADE, isn't making you as much profit as you might think. Throw in the fact that most of the games we DON'T see, are niche titles, so sales aren't going to be spectacular. Let's be modestly optimistic and say a game might sell...oh, 50,000 copies. (Yes, that's modestly optimistic.)

That MAY bring in a profit, depending on localization costs and licensing fees, but it would be tiny. Not worth the effort it took or the risk.

The harsh reality would be that most of these games would be lucky to see sales over 10,000, and they would all be doing nothing but draining cash from the companies releasing them. If every game that gets made were to get an international release, companies would be bankrupt in just a couple of years.

The simple fact is that game companies think long and hard about where to release their games. If they decide to exclude places, it's because they don't feel it's going to be worth the investment. How much of the rest of the world do you think want countless visual novel/dating sims? Not many, I assure you.

I know what you're screaming at your computer now, "BUT WHAT ABOUT XENOBLADE, MAN?!" I firmly believe that Nintendo had every intention of releasing that game in the states but people on the internet are annoyed easily and impatient and they flipped out when Europe got a game when America didn't.

"HOW COULD EUROPE GET THIS GAME AND NOT US?! THIS IS BULLCRAP! IT'S ALREADY TRANSLATED, JUST RELEASE IT!"

Like I said, it's not always that simple, even for games that are in English.

Also, I think you might not know why region locking exists. It may SOUND like it makes no sense. After all, shouldn't we be able to play every game on any system, right? Well, there are some good reasons...

First, is piracy. Yes, pirates routinely find ways AROUND region locking, but it's a deterrent. Like locks on your house. The real thieves are going to get in anyways, but locks keep honest people honest.

Then you have sales figures. With region locking, you can accurately see how many copies you sold in a specific region. This helps companies make decisions about what games to make in the future and how many copies they need to make to meet potential demand. Also, what regions are buy what kinds of games. This is important.

Next, is money. Actually, this one is huge. If games aren't region locked, then people will do nothing but buy all of their games from whatever country that has the cheapest prices. This would mean HUGE losses for companies. If you understand how currency works, then you should realize how big of a deal this is.

Then, there are also smaller reasons like the ability to stagger releases so not everyone tries to buy it all at once. Also, the ability to keep games that may contain material that may be offensive out of certain areas. Actually, the "Offensive Material" part is a very big deal in certain parts of the world.

So yeah, your post describes a nice utopia, but it's one that would destroy the industry if actually attempted.
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PSN / XBL: JunpeiIori
Well, everyone knows Custer died at Little Bighorn. What this book presupposes is... maybe he didn't.
#55loosingENDS(Topic Creator)Posted 1/12/2013 6:41:11 PM
JunpeiIori posted...
Mottman posted...
I almost never post here, but I have something I really want to say.

Stuff


In a perfect world, that would be wonderful. However, the video game industry is a business and the stuff you're suggesting requires money.

It takes money to localize a game, because we all don't speak the same language. You also have licensing fees, because it may be licensed in one country but that doesn't mean you get a free ride in another. Then you have manufacturing costs. Then you have shipping costs.


But most people speak English and have internet access, so a online only English release would be cheap in both ways

Ni no Kuni DS did not come because of the manual, BUT this could also adapted for an online in game version

Anything can be done when there is a will, the rest is cheap excuses by companies
#56kimimiPosted 1/12/2013 8:33:58 PM
loosingENDS posted...

Anything can be done when there is a will, the rest is cheap excuses by companies


The whole point of Junpei's post was to try an explain to you that these things aren't cheap! Hiring competent translators that will get the script translated in good time then getting it inserted into the game is a tricky and lengthy process. If the game has voice acting you need to work out if the contracts covered overseas releases or if you need to pay extra for that as well. Too expensive? Cut it out - and watch your forums explode with gamers complaining that they don't want it any more/will buy the Jp version/will wait for the pirated undub instead.

Companies don't like not making money, if any of them thought there was a good chance of profit they'd release these RPGs no question - they aren't holding back because they can't be bothered.
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#57JunpeiIoriPosted 1/13/2013 7:33:53 AM
Thanks, Kimimi.

Guys, I think you're grossly underestimated how much money things costs in this business and overestimating how much money there is to be made with these kinds of games in this current climate.

Nothing is cheap, there is only less expensive, and it's still a lot of money.
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PSN / XBL: JunpeiIori
Well, everyone knows Custer died at Little Bighorn. What this book presupposes is... maybe he didn't.
#58Gaming_Pal_TEJPosted 1/13/2013 7:43:59 AM
Some people just want to live in their fantasy world where bringing over a game is simple and easy and when they don't bring something over it means they hate money.
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Hooah!
#59CojiroseanPosted 1/13/2013 11:34:48 PM
Loved the short-lived irony with Xenoblade in the US. For once we PAL gamers had a game BEFORE the US.

But, it doesn't change the fact that we are STILL waiting for Devil Survivor Overclocked in PAL land...
#60loosingENDS(Topic Creator)Posted 1/16/2013 3:19:20 PM
JunpeiIori posted...
Thanks, Kimimi.

Guys, I think you're grossly underestimated how much money things costs in this business and overestimating how much money there is to be made with these kinds of games in this current climate.

Nothing is cheap, there is only less expensive, and it's still a lot of money.


You suggest that a translation will cost more money than they would make selling the game ?

I have a hard time to believe that