The Red Wedding really was a much bigger deal on the show than the books SPOILER

#1pothocketPosted 6/4/2013 5:10:39 AM
-no future spoilers-

For those that haven't read the books, there's quite a few reasons, I think, why the Red Wedding was a much more dramatic event on the show. Obviously you have Robb's wife being killed, which wasn't in the books. And not just her being there but the way she was killed. It really drove home that message of why this is happening and added a lot of weight to events. They didn't just start killing people, they specifically focused on Robb's unborn child. The heir to the kingdom that, by rights, Frey believes should be his blood - but isn't since Robb broke his vow.

Then there's Cat taking a woman hostage, making sure Frey pays a wife-for-a-wife, raising the stakes and adding more depth that wasn't in the books.

And then there's other stuff like how the two different mediums tell their stories. Robb was not a main character. The reader never really spent "face time" with him, rather just observed him through Cat's perspective. And Cat is kind of a cold and distant person. So there wasn't nearly as much of an emotional investment in these characters. From the books, I'd say the biggest impact of the events at the Red Wedding come from Arya and how she was *this* close to being reunited with her family only to watch helplessly as it's all taken away from her yet again. That's how GRRM drove home the emotional impact of these events, through Arya.

Also, with Cat and Robb not being as central to the overall narrative as they are in the show, there wasn't that feeling of being "adrift" that I'm sure some TV viewers are experiencing. I've seen a lot of topics asking if GoT can ever recover from the RW now that "the good guys" are dead. Who is the hero? Who are we supposed to root for? What will drive the story?

That was never an issue in the books. It was obvious who was going to continue supporting the story and who we should root for - Dany, Arya, Jon, and Tyrion - just like it was before the RW. There was never that feeling that the story has driven off a cliff and may never recover.

So yeah, as much as I like the books I think the show did this scene better.
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well I am not like your dad. I worked as a chef at TGIF-Mattson
#2J1MM3LPosted 6/4/2013 5:18:47 AM
Nope.
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#3pothocket(Topic Creator)Posted 6/4/2013 5:27:49 AM
J1MM3L posted...
Nope.


*slow sarcastic clapping*

Way to have a discussion, buddy.
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well I am not like your dad. I worked as a chef at TGIF-Mattson
#4JuanCarlos1Posted 6/4/2013 5:32:29 AM
I agree. The scene had me almost in tears, something the book never accomplished.This show was made with the excuse to make this event, and you bet D & D will be going all out in it. Of course, as a reader knowing what happens the event isnt going to be as shocking for you, but I bet if the show wouldve been the one to break you in... it wouldve had a bigger impact.
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#5doofy102Posted 6/4/2013 5:47:10 AM
From what I remember, the red wedding book experience was (honestly) perfect. Everything about it. I felt like I HAD spent time with Robb too - even just Robb in the Catelyn scenes, suffering from having to perform his first public execution - stuff like tha really fleshed him out for me in that book.

With the show I still had my subconsciousn reservations about the show's boring directing with camera angles etc.

Oh, not to mention the book (being a book) kept the PERFECTED red wedding experience going for much longer. I felt exhausted after it ended, whereas show, yeah, you can't dwell in hell for as long.
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#6IamvegitoPosted 6/4/2013 6:07:18 AM
I think the scene on TV captured the scene in the book very well. I don't think it felt "bigger" on screen than in the book, as I don't think people perceived Robb to be the "main character." Non-readers I know see that to be Jon, Dany, or Tyrion (just like readers did at the time!) and are really excited for what Arya will do now. Because they don't think Arya is dead, too (like we did when we read it) the impact actually seems lessened.
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#7shagadelicPosted 6/4/2013 6:22:19 AM
pothocket posted...
-no future spoilers-

For those that haven't read the books, there's quite a few reasons, I think, why the Red Wedding was a much more dramatic event on the show. Obviously you have Robb's wife being killed, which wasn't in the books. And not just her being there but the way she was killed. It really drove home that message of why this is happening and added a lot of weight to events. They didn't just start killing people, they specifically focused on Robb's unborn child. The heir to the kingdom that, by rights, Frey believes should be his blood - but isn't since Robb broke his vow.

Then there's Cat taking a woman hostage, making sure Frey pays a wife-for-a-wife, raising the stakes and adding more depth that wasn't in the books.

And then there's other stuff like how the two different mediums tell their stories. Robb was not a main character. The reader never really spent "face time" with him, rather just observed him through Cat's perspective. And Cat is kind of a cold and distant person. So there wasn't nearly as much of an emotional investment in these characters. From the books, I'd say the biggest impact of the events at the Red Wedding come from Arya and how she was *this* close to being reunited with her family only to watch helplessly as it's all taken away from her yet again. That's how GRRM drove home the emotional impact of these events, through Arya.

Also, with Cat and Robb not being as central to the overall narrative as they are in the show, there wasn't that feeling of being "adrift" that I'm sure some TV viewers are experiencing. I've seen a lot of topics asking if GoT can ever recover from the RW now that "the good guys" are dead. Who is the hero? Who are we supposed to root for? What will drive the story?

That was never an issue in the books. It was obvious who was going to continue supporting the story and who we should root for - Dany, Arya, Jon, and Tyrion - just like it was before the RW. There was never that feeling that the story has driven off a cliff and may never recover.

So yeah, as much as I like the books I think the show did this scene better.


I don't agree at all that the emotional impact in the books was through Arya. Cat was a perspective character that many felt attachment to. The emotional impact came from Cat watching her first born son and their bannermen get brutally murdered and the fact that, as far as she knows, her entire family dies with her and Robb.
#8pothocket(Topic Creator)Posted 6/4/2013 6:25:46 AM
Maybe it was just me but I didn't care for Cat. I was glad I no longer had to read any chapters from her perspective.
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well I am not like your dad. I worked as a chef at TGIF-Mattson
#9DarkSymbiotePosted 6/4/2013 6:51:43 AM(edited)
I just finished watching it and now I am very sad. Don't spoil it for me but I hope the Starks have their revenge.

EDIT: I'm surprised the latest episode didn't have any porn.
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#10MastodanPosted 6/4/2013 7:01:37 AM
The episode lacked the attempts to fight by the Northmen like Jon Umber though, that makes the scene feel more desperate. Essentially, you see three characters killed whereas in the book you know of more.