"No Lois, Superman is what I can do. Clark is who I am."

#61The AdderPosted 6/18/2013 12:27:18 AM
Flame_Hazard posted...
Alright, fair enough. Good points and I suppose I can believe that his disguise should fool almost everyone. However, barring everything occurring after Superman and Clark Kent make appearances in the same place, how exactly does this manage to fool even Lois Lane herself?


It doesn't. He revealed he was Superman to her right before he proposed to her and her response was basically "Yeah, I know, I'm not stupid, Clark."
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The Mean Green Thunder Machine
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#62The AdderPosted 6/18/2013 12:32:13 AM
CKnight posted...
You guys put too much thought into the disguise.

Brad Pitt slumped over, in glasses, wearing clothes 2 sizes to big, talking in a high pitch voice is still Brad Pitt and everyone will recognize him.

The glasses thing works and is accepted because its iconic to the character. As iconic as Batman having a batmobile or Spider-man using web.

So I really don't understand why people keep asking about it. Everyone knows the disguise is lousy and wouldn't work but most wouldn't have it any other way. Which is why they keep using it in everything Superman.


If you lived in Washington and there was a guy named Bob working in your office and Bob looked a bit like President Obama. Except he was shorter. And chubbier. And had a higher voice. And wore glasses. And you saw him almost every day. And you'd seen him and the President together before. Would you think that Bob was the President? No. And anyone who did would be looked at like they were insane.
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The Mean Green Thunder Machine
He's-a Luigi, #1!
#63Devilman_AmonPosted 6/18/2013 1:48:44 AM
The Adder posted...
CKnight posted...
You guys put too much thought into the disguise.

Brad Pitt slumped over, in glasses, wearing clothes 2 sizes to big, talking in a high pitch voice is still Brad Pitt and everyone will recognize him.

The glasses thing works and is accepted because its iconic to the character. As iconic as Batman having a batmobile or Spider-man using web.

So I really don't understand why people keep asking about it. Everyone knows the disguise is lousy and wouldn't work but most wouldn't have it any other way. Which is why they keep using it in everything Superman.


If you lived in Washington and there was a guy named Bob working in your office and Bob looked a bit like President Obama. Except he was shorter. And chubbier. And had a higher voice. And wore glasses. And you saw him almost every day. And you'd seen him and the President together before. Would you think that Bob was the President? No. And anyone who did would be looked at like they were insane.



no
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#64Aussie_Filo71Posted 6/18/2013 4:02:20 AM
CKnight posted...
You guys put too much thought into the disguise.

Brad Pitt slumped over, in glasses, wearing clothes 2 sizes to big, talking in a high pitch voice is still Brad Pitt and everyone will recognize him.

The glasses thing works and is accepted because its iconic to the character. As iconic as Batman having a batmobile or Spider-man using web.

So I really don't understand why people keep asking about it. Everyone knows the disguise is lousy and wouldn't work but most wouldn't have it any other way. Which is why they keep using it in everything Superman.


I have a friend who looks strikingly similar to Jonah Hill to the point where people have actually approached him asking for autographs (well, it happened once, but you get the point).

Also,

http://loyalkng.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/zooey-deschanel.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_aHgISFyhhBw/TRtghj0az7I/AAAAAAAAAN4/fWUuHAOyc5c/s1600/jeffrey-dean-morgan-javier-bardem.jpg

These are different people.

People can look scarily similar. The way I see it, Superman doesn't wear a mask and everyone knows where he lives and knows his name. Why would they even think he has a secret identity? Sure, there's this one guy that kinda looks like him, except he's shorter, fatter, sounds different and wears glasses. But why the hell would Superman need a secret identity any way?
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You know what would give me a massive orgasm? Consensual sex with an attractive female. Walt_Cummings
#65Aussie_Filo71Posted 6/18/2013 4:08:36 AM
Bad Ass Chucky posted...
prince_leo posted...
When people are talking about Clark Kent, it's assumed that they're talking about Clark Kent the reporter.
As mentioned by myself and several others, there's three different aspects to Kal-El. Superman, the hero who inspires everyone; Clark Kent, the mild-mannered reporter who reveals corruption with his wits; and the true Kal-El (for lack of a better name), who was raised by the Kents and has superhuman powers but deals with his own insecurities.


There is no "true" Kal-El. There's only Clark Kent and Superman. Clark didn't grow up on Krypton nor was he instilled with their system of beliefs. He was raised on Earth and everything he is and has, is due to the Kents and that specific upbringing in Kansas.

Devilman_Amon posted...
Thats who Bill is referring to. That's the disguise. Clark Kent the reporter. Superman is not a disguise. Superman is who Clark Kent really is.


"No Lois, Superman is what I can do. Clark is who I am."


I'm curious, do you actually read Superman comics? Or does your knowledge come solely from the cartoons and movies? There's nothing wrong with that, but you have to realize that there are many versions of the Superman character. The version that prince_leo and others described is from stories such as "All Star Superman" and "Birthright" by Grant Morrison and Mark Waid respectively. Those two stories in particular have had a large influence on the story of MoS and that is the version of Superman where there are in fact three personas that the writers have used.

The version you are describing is similar to some interpretations of Post Crisis Superman but in comics, the version where Clark has a third "true" persona that he uses when he is with his closest friends and family is the most commonly used one.

You have to understand that in comicbooks, there can be several interpretations of a character. For example, the Silver Age Superman focused more on the super than the man and was often extremely alien.
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You know what would give me a massive orgasm? Consensual sex with an attractive female. Walt_Cummings
#66prince_leoPosted 6/18/2013 11:05:40 AM
Aussie_Filo71 posted...
The version that prince_leo and others described is from stories such as "All Star Superman" and "Birthright" by Grant Morrison and Mark Waid respectively.


I should probably add that I was defending my view on who he is, obviously there are multiple stories that contradict each other on it.
I was using what I found was the best stories of Superman.

Aussie_Filo71 posted...
You have to understand that in comicbooks, there can be several interpretations of a character.


To add to this, wiki makes it very simple:

Superman is real, Clark Kent the mask: Pre-Crisis interpretations of Superman assumed that Clark Kent was the "mask" and Kal-El the person (in the classic story Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, when Superman's dual life is revealed, he completely abandons his Clark Kent persona). In one 1960s comic, when Kent finds himself at a loose end when staff at the Daily Planet go on strike, he seriously considers it a chance to try out a new identity in case he has "to abandon [his] Clark Kent role permanently." His options include becoming a full-time policeman or even a mere tramp "whom no one would ever suspect of being the Man of Steel." In the Smallville episode "Masquerade", Clark tells Lois that Clark Kent is just a name, just two words, and that the Blur is who he really is. This argument, made in Jules Feiffer's series of articles published in The Great Comic Book Heroes, is famously cited in a climactic scene of Kill Bill Vol. 2, with the character of Bill noting that Superman was not born into his alter ego (Spider-Man was "Peter Parker" first, Batman was born "Bruce Wayne"), using the blanket he was wrapped in as his costume, and Clark Kent is a collage of mankind's less impressive traits meant to blend in with other humans (as well as a device to pursue Lois Lane's affections), though as Bill is the villain of the movie, whether or not audiences are meant to empathize with anything he says is debatable. Richard Donner, the director of the first Reeve movie, stated that he believes Clark Kent to be the disguise.
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#67prince_leoPosted 6/18/2013 11:05:42 AM
Clark Kent is real, Superman the mask: With John Byrne's more assertive revamp of Clark Kent as well as Superman's greater grounding in Earth culture and humanity (as opposed to the everpresent Kryptonian heritage of the Pre-Crisis version), Superman is considered the "mask" and Clark the person. This is made explicit by Clark himself in Superman (vol. 2) #53, when following his revelation to Lois of his role as Superman (Action Comics #662), he states: "I'm Clark, the man you love. Superman is the creation you named me, Lois." In pre-Crisis continuity, Kal-El was already a toddler before leaving Krypton, and retained memories of that childhood that later resurfaced, while, in Post-Crisis continuity, he was sent to Earth pre-natally in a "birthing matrix" (more recently retconned as an infant) and raised entirely by the Kents. As a result of their rearing, Kal-El grows up to think of himself as Clark Kent, completely unaware of his alien heritage until he was well into adulthood (the fact that the Kents found him sometime just after the Cold War meant that the Kents assumed the rocket they found him in was from an Earth-based space program possibly that of Communist Russia and that Clark had superhuman abilities because he was either a metahuman or some kind of genetic experiment). Although the morals instilled in him by the Kents have motivated Kal-El to use his abilities to help others, he developed the Superman persona to protect his Clark Kent identity. In the Superman: The Animated Series episode "The Late Mr. Kent", wherein Clark Kent is presumed dead, Superman expresses frustration at the idea of not being Clark and having to be someone else instead ("I am Clark. I need to be Clark. I'd go crazy if I had to be Superman all the time!"). In a previous episode, the third part of the "Last Son of Krypton" arc, Jonathan "Pa" Kent assures his adoptive son that he will "always be Clark Kent" and that "Superman just helps out every now and then."

Neither Clark Kent nor Superman is the real person: Some versions of Superman explain that Clark Kent and Superman are both identities of the same person. It has been implied, especially in the 'alternate future' story Kingdom Come, that the Clark Kent persona is symbolic of the values taught to him by his wholesome Midwestern parents, the values he holds most dear: his instinctive knowledge of right and wrong that allows him to adopt his Superman persona, without being consumed by the moral implications of his actions; Superman is the means through which he can bring this example to the world. At the very end of the novel, where Superman stands poised to destroy the United Nations, Norman McCay makes him realise that, when he abandoned Clark Kent fifteen years ago after the murder of Lois Lane by the Joker and retreated into his Superman self, he lost this instinctive morality and thus the ability to be the hero Superman. With this knowledge and a pair of glasses given to him as a gift by Wonder Woman, 'Clark' regains his humanity, and sets out to become a hero again by re-fertilizing the irradiated fields of Kansas. Director Bryan Singer stated at the 2006 Comic-Con that he favored the three-persona concept, stating that there was Clark Kent on the farm, the bumbling Metropolis Clark, and Superman, the Last Son of Krypton. Brandon Routh himself stated, in an HBO First Look interview that he was playing three characters; Clark Kent, the reporter/farm boy; Superman, the protagonist and savior of Metropolis; and Kal-El, the Last Son of Krypton.
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No man stands so tall as he who stoops to help a child.
http://i.imgur.com/VH2Nc.jpg - Young Leo has more swag than you