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Why is it politically correct to call black people "African Americans"?

#41Maverick3000Posted 10/10/2011 10:37:01 PM
Ugh......


First of all, African American is not used because it is PC. It became popular due to the influence and rise of moderate civil rights groups who prefered the term to "Black" as they felt it emphasized them being "American" and black. Jesse Jackson is probably the biggest reason for it's use today.

There was never an agreement among black people of what term is best used. Many activists still preferred black because they thought it emphasized the fact that they are not "equal" to other Americans still and build solidarity with other African people around the world. As mentioned before, the term is gaining traction and is prefered by many now due to (a.) the rise of African immigrants who have no historical connection to previous Black civil rights and (b.) The rise of hip/hop and other black media forms that borrow influences from Malcolm X and other activists off the similar vain during the 1960s and 1970s, moreso than MLK or Jesse Jackson.
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we're not all geniuses like you Maverick. >_> - AWrulez
#42sloth7dPosted 10/10/2011 11:25:26 PM
god_of_toast posted...
Indeed. It makes much more sense to directly describe a discernable trait (skin tone) over assumed heritage (which isnt as discernable or can be rejected by the person in the first place). The world really doesn't make any sense.

All in favor of adopting the elven "Dark/Light" description system for classifying ethnicity?
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#43JolteonPosted 10/11/2011 12:22:26 AM
god_of_toast posted...
This. I dont like it when people call me "Asian" eventhough I was born and raised in Australia. I doubt most black people would like to be called "African" despite having 200ish years of heritage in America.

They're two different things though. If someone calls you "Asian", they're referring to your race, not your nationality. I'm not suggesting that you're "wrong" to be annoyed by it or anything, but it definitely strikes me as being a little out of the ordinary. I don't know of any equally innocuous term. "Yellow", "Oriental", I'd think those would be far more obnoxious.

Obviously first and foremost, you should be called an Australian, but if someone's asking about your race, what would you prefer to be called?

This is a genuine question, too. I'm actually really curious what you'd prefer. I've been friends with a pretty wide variety of people coming from Asian ethnicities my whole life (even my wife is South Korean by birth), and this is no joke my first encounter with someone who objects to the term.
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#44sloth7dPosted 10/11/2011 12:29:50 AM
They're two different things though. If someone calls you "Asian", they're referring to your race, not your nationality. I'm not suggesting that you're "wrong" to be annoyed by it or anything, but it definitely strikes me as being a little out of the ordinary. I don't know of any equally innocuous term. "Yellow", "Oriental", I'd think those would be far more obnoxious.

African isn't a nationality either.
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Religion is like sex. It's necessary, unavoidable, and disgusting leaving you with a deep sense of shame after practicing it. Please don't Religion in public.
#45JolteonPosted 10/11/2011 12:31:57 AM
I'm not suggesting that it is.
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Is this finally a conundrum that CAN'T be solved by helicopter theft?
#46sloth7dPosted 10/11/2011 12:35:34 AM
I thought you implied that when you said, "they're two different things."
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Religion is like sex. It's necessary, unavoidable, and disgusting leaving you with a deep sense of shame after practicing it. Please don't Religion in public.
#47JolteonPosted 10/11/2011 12:48:58 AM
The implication is that the country that you were raised in (I could go off on a tangent about military kids and how nationality is sometimes fluid, but I don't want to stray too far off here...) helps to define your nationality, but that your genetic background defines your race, and that they're two different things. Black, White, Asian, Latino/Hispanic, and even Native American are all fairly general terms that have very little to do with one's actual nationality.

I wasn't really intending to include "African" in what I was talking about at all.
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Is this finally a conundrum that CAN'T be solved by helicopter theft?
#48LuigiVampaSwagPosted 10/11/2011 1:05:39 AM
It has been argued that the classification of 'black' was originally inspired by a light metaphor, where black stood for 'ignorant' and 'uncultured', in contrast to 'white' standing for 'civilization' and so forth (ex: Dark Africa). So there are those that opt out of classifying people as 'black' because of the negative connotations that it might carry (maybe not necessarily for that reason)

I understand the reasoning, but I feel that that prejudice has faded out of the general consciousness, where 'black' has to mean something inferior. So I choose to refer to myself as black, just because it suggests some kind of uniformity that 'African-American' cannot
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#49sloth7dPosted 10/11/2011 1:38:46 AM
Sorry Jolteon. My mistake.
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Religion is like sex. It's necessary, unavoidable, and disgusting leaving you with a deep sense of shame after practicing it. Please don't Religion in public.
#50JolteonPosted 10/11/2011 1:40:11 AM
Not at all. I wasn't exactly crystal clear, either.
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Is this finally a conundrum that CAN'T be solved by helicopter theft?