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Is it discrimination to not hire someone because they have tattoos?

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2 years ago#31
Yes we do. I chose to be an atheist. I remember the exact moment when I stopped choosing to be a Christian and chose to be an atheist. I wasn't born with atheist DNA.
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Libertarian Socialist - Combining the two worst people you met at college into one.
2 years ago#32
No we don't. Why would you think that?

My initial reaction was "of course we chose to be atheists!", but really...I don't think I really did "choose". I mean, it's just a matter of what's rational, logical, and supported by evidence. I never "chose" to be an atheist, my bulls*** detector just went off the first time I heard anything about religion.

I couldn't "choose" to believe in the supernatural. I mean...really, how can you even measure that? Sure, I could say a Hail Mary and bow to Mecca and put a bindi dot on my forehead, but that wouldn't change my knowledge of reality.
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Going to Saskatoon to catch an all ages Ahnabith Gish show for 15 Canadian dollars. Maybe I'll get a wrist band so I can drink a refreshing Molson's - Orca
2 years ago#33
It is discrimination, in the same way that it would be discrimination not to hire somebody who comes to a job interview in their pj's. Professional attire is generally expected for a job interview, so cover up your tattoos for job interviews.
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Home is behind, the world ahead. And there are many paths to tread
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2 years ago#34
Most of the time companies are allowed to regulate the appearance of their employees. That's why dress codes are allowed to exist. This falls under that category. It isn't discrimination in any legal sense.
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He who strikes with meaning is killed by meaning.
2 years ago#35
Orca posted...
Yes we do. I chose to be an atheist. I remember the exact moment when I stopped choosing to be a Christian and chose to be an atheist. I wasn't born with atheist DNA.


I just...I just don't even...

There is a difference between discovering you're an atheist and "deciding" to be one.

Seriously, ask anyone. Any ex-theist that is now atheist won't say they "decided" to do it, it came after a lot of questioning and often emotional turmoil. They didn't choose to let religion go, in fact many didn't WANT to stop believing, but it was a necessary consequence of what they had learned.

If X is a reason to believe, it either looks valid or invalid to you. You don't "choose" for it to look valid, it either is or isn't depending on your personality and experiences.

And any atheist like me who never truly was a theist to begin with won't say we "chose" atheism, we simply discovered that we had never actually believed the crap theists said. We just went through the motions as kids because that's what people did. Only when I was older and saw and understood how serious people were about religion did I realize I...wasn't. I never chose this, it's just what I am. I can't choose to be anything else because I can't just decide to let illogical crap suddenly look convincing.

So speak for yourself. I've literally never met a single theist OR atheist who says it's just a matter of arbitrary choice like you do.
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You are the universe
Expressing itself as a human, for a little while
2 years ago#36
But by that metric, we don't really "choose" anything; political beliefs included.
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Going to Saskatoon to catch an all ages Ahnabith Gish show for 15 Canadian dollars. Maybe I'll get a wrist band so I can drink a refreshing Molson's - Orca
2 years ago#37
Redcount posted...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Body_Modification

It's basically an excuse to not get fired based on your body modifications.


Having met a couple people who live that ... lifestyle... the way they speak about and go under the needle/piercing device frequently, it really does sound more like a sincerely held spiritual belief than a fashion statement. The descriptions of the experience and meaning of the modifications are baffling to me, but not dissimilar to traditional euphoric and symbolic religious experiences.

I'm not sure at what point "being spiritual" crosses over to a protected religious practice, though. Religious iconography like a cross necklace isn't normally worn as a required religious practice, but it is an individual spiritual expression that many people feel should be protected.
2 years ago#38
Redcount posted...
But by that metric, we don't really "choose" anything; political beliefs included.


Uh, yeah. What of it?

Do you really think we choose what makes the most sense to us?

It is not the case that we pick a party and then consider their arguments, we simply declare the party that is most align with what we think is best. We don't choose what we think is best.

When I was old enough to think about such things, I didn't say "I choose to be Democrat" to myself, it was more like "I guess I'm a Democrat then" because they represented what I agreed with. For the most part at least.

Although I wouldn't go so far as to say we don't choose ANYthing, but political parties and religious beliefs are simply reflections of our inward selves, which we don't choose at all. I think people here are confusing discovering the name of their party/belief with choosing to hold that belief.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIle9HzfwvE&feature=g-user-f&list=FLh9g56Xhr_OKqZKxN4b4KrQ

Ignore the atheist rhetoric if you want, but he illustrates well the misconceptions have about free will/choices.
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You are the universe
Expressing itself as a human, for a little while
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