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Google is forbidding people from reselling their product

#1765351Posted 4/18/2013 11:17:31 AM
http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/04/google-glass-resales/

Didn't the Supreme Court JUST rule on something like this? l believe it is called the first sale doctrine or something? We should be able to resell anything we purchase legally. Should Google be allowed to do this?
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#2TheRealJiraiyaPosted 4/18/2013 11:19:45 AM
Looks like this is just for the trial version for people chosen to test it, it says there is no word on whether this will apply to the actual product when it hits the market
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One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. -Plato
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#3wolf_blitzer85Posted 4/18/2013 11:32:54 AM
f*** Google, let their corporate attorney thugs chase me across Craigslist and flea markets. I have rocket-tipped boots that send me 100Mph.
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Redcount doesn't even lift and he thinks he's all badass. -- Cynyn
#4Evil Genius 9Posted 4/18/2013 11:33:53 AM(edited)
Nope, not the same thing. You don't sign a license agreement when you buy books or other goods, but you do when you buy software, and the courts have mostly upheld those kinds of EULAs (at least in the US). You can technically resell it, but they reserve the right to deactivate it if you do.

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#5765351(Topic Creator)Posted 4/18/2013 11:36:20 AM
From: Evil Genius 9 | #004
Nope, not the same thing. You don't sign a license agreement when you buy books or other goods, but you do when you buy software, and the courts have mostly upheld those kinds of EULAs (at least in the US). You can technically resell it, but they reserve the right to deactivate it if you do.


what's stopping everyone from putting "software" in everything
for an extreme example: a table the has "software" to hold the four legs together
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http://i.imgur.com/51k3UQQ.jpg http://i.imgur.com/DFXeEey.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/pQBmc9B.jpg http://i.imgur.com/HITrFIo.jpg
#6treewojimaPosted 4/18/2013 11:43:10 AM
it's not publicly on sale though, nor is it the final version of the product. it's more of a limited edition giveaway

For the moment, not just anybody can buy the eyewear.

Google has created the Silicon Valley equivalent of a velvet rope under its so-called Google Glass Explorers program. If Google liked what you posted on social media under the hashtag #ifihadglassand, Google grants you the opportunity to fork out $1,500 for the Explorer edition of the headset.

Google declined comment. Google also isnít saying when it would lift its velvet rope and whether the same Draconian terms of service would apply when it does lift the velvet rope.
#7Evil Genius 9Posted 4/18/2013 11:43:38 AM
From: 765351 | #005
From: Evil Genius 9 | #004
Nope, not the same thing. You don't sign a license agreement when you buy books or other goods, but you do when you buy software, and the courts have mostly upheld those kinds of EULAs (at least in the US). You can technically resell it, but they reserve the right to deactivate it if you do.


what's stopping everyone from putting "software" in everything
for an extreme example: a table the has "software" to hold the four legs together


That is an excellent question, and in fact now that most cars have built-in software, there was some concern over whether a EULA could be used to prevent the resale of cars, but for now I believe the software is only copyrighted and no EULA is involved. But it remains something the courts will probably have to re-address multiple times in the future.

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#8wolf_blitzer85Posted 4/18/2013 11:49:04 AM
ITT: Forbidding someone from doing something automatically stops them from doing it.
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Redcount doesn't even lift and he thinks he's all badass. -- Cynyn
#9UnrivaledKoopaPosted 4/18/2013 11:56:31 AM
765351 posted...
From: Evil Genius 9 | #004
Nope, not the same thing. You don't sign a license agreement when you buy books or other goods, but you do when you buy software, and the courts have mostly upheld those kinds of EULAs (at least in the US). You can technically resell it, but they reserve the right to deactivate it if you do.


what's stopping everyone from putting "software" in everything
for an extreme example: a table the has "software" to hold the four legs together


Nothing, although in this example it would increase consumer costs while restricting what you can do with the table, nobody would buy it.