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Lots of encouragement for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.

#11PedroMontanaPosted 5/7/2013 7:12:54 AM
Nitro378 posted...
Europe is our future, despite the difficulties, it's not exactly a shock to hear that a senior ex-Tory is willing to come out against it when half of their voterbase are rabid little englanders.


This, and also what Red XIV said.

My only real concern for Europe are the next German elections. The Germans really don't appreciate their christian/liberal coalition as much as they should.
A christian/social democrat coalition with Merkel as chancellor would be ok too (from an economic perspective), but i really don't want to see Steinbrück as a social democrat/green chancellor.
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No More Heroes
#12Zora_Prince(Topic Creator)Posted 5/7/2013 9:57:05 AM
PedroMontana posted...
Nitro378 posted...
Europe is our future, despite the difficulties, it's not exactly a shock to hear that a senior ex-Tory is willing to come out against it when half of their voterbase are rabid little englanders.


This, and also what Red XIV said.

My only real concern for Europe are the next German elections. The Germans really don't appreciate their christian/liberal coalition as much as they should.
A christian/social democrat coalition with Merkel as chancellor would be ok too (from an economic perspective), but i really don't want to see Steinbrück as a social democrat/green chancellor.


Can you explain the primary differences between these parties? I'm ignorant to German politics.
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We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty. Dissent is the highest form of patriotism.
#13Neo1661Posted 5/7/2013 11:42:30 AM
I'm against purely because getting out would mean our decent workers rights go out the window. Or am I wrong on that? Our rights would be like your rights - Extremely crappy.
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#14PedroMontanaPosted 5/7/2013 12:47:59 PM
Zora_Prince posted...
PedroMontana posted...
Nitro378 posted...
Europe is our future, despite the difficulties, it's not exactly a shock to hear that a senior ex-Tory is willing to come out against it when half of their voterbase are rabid little englanders.


This, and also what Red XIV said.

My only real concern for Europe are the next German elections. The Germans really don't appreciate their christian/liberal coalition as much as they should.
A christian/social democrat coalition with Merkel as chancellor would be ok too (from an economic perspective), but i really don't want to see Steinbrück as a social democrat/green chancellor.


Can you explain the primary differences between these parties? I'm ignorant to German politics.



1. Because there are currently 3-6 parties that have realistic chances to get represented in parliament, Germany usually gets ruled by a coalition of 2 parties, with the chancellor coming from the bigger party.

2. The biggest 2 parties are usually (with their full name translated to English and their trademark color in brackets):

CDU (Christian Democratic Union, black):
Germany's conservative party, so practically the german Tory/Republicans. They are significantly more moderate then the the american Republicans for 2 reasons: Economically, modern Germany's economy had a strong social aspect from the beginnig, so keeping this aspect intact can be considered conservative.
Socially, because of the experiences with the NS dictatorship, they usually try to be careful to stay far away from looking racist.

SPD (Social Democratic Party of Germany, red):
Basically Germany's Labor/Democrats. They ruled Germany under chancellor Schröder in a coalition with the Greens until 2005, when they had to go into a coalition with the stronger CDU under chancellor Merkel, who in 2009 was able to replace that with a CDU/FDP coalition.
The favourite coalition partner of the SPD are the Greens.


(to be continued with the smaller parties)
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No More Heroes
#15PedroMontanaPosted 5/7/2013 1:43:20 PM(edited)
3. The most important smaller parties of the German parliament are:

The Greens (Coalition 90 The Greens, green):
Environmentalist party, socially and economically left but not communist. The Greens usually go into coalition with the SPD, this coalition is then called red-green.

FDP (Free Democratic Party, yellow):
This is what people in Germany call liberal, they are for free market, less regulation , less bureaucracy, lower taxes (like the conservative parties in other countries), but also for personal freedoms and civil rights (no spying on the population, less censorship).
They usually go into coalition with the CDU, this coalition is called black-yellow despite the CDU/FDP's efforts to get it known as christian-liberal.

The Left (The Left, a darker shade of red):
Socialist, partially communist party. The western members are mostly ex SPD people frustrated with Schröders reforms, the eastern members are practically the successors of the DDR dictatorship.
No party wants to go into a coalition with these on a federal level, but the SPD sometimes does it on a state level.


Because there is a 5% hurdle, the other parties (racist Nazi parties like NPD, the anarchist APPD, the spiritual violett, other christian parties) usually don't play a role, but can stick around as a lower percentage is needed to get financial support and mandatory TV ads.
The only smaller party that has a chance is The Pirate Party, a internet activist/hacker/nerd party that did surprisingly well for some time, but is in some trouble recently.


Anyway, because of whatever Merkel is doing is obviosly working well for Germany, economically, i see no reason to replace her with the SPD's alternative Peer Steinbrück who left some bad impressions recently (he openly said he wants the chancellor to earn more money... as the SPD's chancellor candidate...).
I prefer the FDP as a coalition partner for the CDU as it's very effective at blocking all the horrible socially conservative censorship/population spying nonsense the CDU's right wing comes up with.
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No More Heroes
#16ChiTownPridePosted 5/7/2013 1:26:12 PM
the real problem is the eurozone, of which the UK isn't a part.

aside from that the EU has been a good thing overall.