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ITT I openly answer questions about Christianity according to Calvinism.

#1kingschosenPosted 5/25/2011 4:31:40 PM
I did this on LUE awhile back, and it made for some interesting discussion. I will try and answer in a timely manner, but sometimes it may take me a little while.
#2DiranosaurPosted 5/25/2011 4:36:20 PM
What is the Calvinist stance on the interpretation and relevance of Deuteronomy 13:12-18?
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#3kingschosen(Topic Creator)Posted 5/25/2011 4:45:09 PM
Diranosaur posted...
What is the Calvinist stance on the interpretation and relevance of Deuteronomy 13:12-18?

We believe in a sovereign God. He has a perfect will, permissive will, and a secret will. His will for the Jews during that time was to protect the legacy of God. So, God ordered them to do this.

Well, couldn't he just ensure that his legacy is retained through less violent means?

Of course, but this is the means that he chose. Why this was his will we don't know. We do know that those orders were directly meant for the Jews at that time.

Isn't it unfair that God killed those unbelievers?

In my Christian belief, God chooses people for salvation; salvation cannot be obtained by any human means. It is something that is directly given by God. These people were not chosen by God, and God facilitated their demise.

It's not fair that they died, though.

Death is a necessity for atonement of sin. This is why all people must die. God chose for their deaths to happen in this way.
#4DiranosaurPosted 5/25/2011 4:48:58 PM
kingschosen posted...
We believe in a sovereign God. He has a perfect will, permissive will, and a secret will. His will for the Jews during that time was to protect the legacy of God. So, God ordered them to do this.

Well, couldn't he just ensure that his legacy is retained through less violent means?

Of course, but this is the means that he chose. Why this was his will we don't know. We do know that those orders were directly meant for the Jews at that time.

Isn't it unfair that God killed those unbelievers?

In my Christian belief, God chooses people for salvation; salvation cannot be obtained by any human means. It is something that is directly given by God. These people were not chosen by God, and God facilitated their demise.

It's not fair that they died, though.

Death is a necessity for atonement of sin. This is why all people must die. God chose for their deaths to happen in this way.



So mass murder of innocents is ok, as long as it's in the name of God?
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My folk band - http://barfota.bandcamp.com/
#5kingschosen(Topic Creator)Posted 5/25/2011 4:50:56 PM
Diranosaur posted...
kingschosen posted...
We believe in a sovereign God. He has a perfect will, permissive will, and a secret will. His will for the Jews during that time was to protect the legacy of God. So, God ordered them to do this.

Well, couldn't he just ensure that his legacy is retained through less violent means?

Of course, but this is the means that he chose. Why this was his will we don't know. We do know that those orders were directly meant for the Jews at that time.

Isn't it unfair that God killed those unbelievers?

In my Christian belief, God chooses people for salvation; salvation cannot be obtained by any human means. It is something that is directly given by God. These people were not chosen by God, and God facilitated their demise.

It's not fair that they died, though.

Death is a necessity for atonement of sin. This is why all people must die. God chose for their deaths to happen in this way.


So mass murder of innocents is ok, as long as it's in the name of God?


If you're going to take my answers out of context, I will quickly ignore you.
#6DiranosaurPosted 5/25/2011 4:56:14 PM(edited)
kingschosen posted...
If you're going to take my answers out of context, I will quickly ignore you.

Well, you clearly said that the acts in those verses were justified, and those acts did consist of mass murder of innocents in the name of God. Wouldn't this rule be the same today?
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My folk band - http://barfota.bandcamp.com/
#7kingschosen(Topic Creator)Posted 5/25/2011 4:57:14 PM
Diranosaur posted...
kingschosen posted...
If you're going to take my answers out of context, I will quickly ignore you.

Well, you clearly said that the acts in those verses were justified, and those acts did consist of mass murder of innocents in the name of God.


And, I clearly said that they were directions for the Jews at that time and done for the sake of preservation of God.

I did not say that mass murder was okay in the name of God in any arbitrary circumstance. During this particular time and these given circumstances, the Jews were ordered by God to do this.
#8kingschosen(Topic Creator)Posted 5/25/2011 4:58:45 PM
Diranosaur posted...
Wouldn't this rule be the same today?

This is what I mean by taking my comment out of context. I blatantly made it clear as to whom the directions were for.
#9DiranosaurPosted 5/25/2011 4:59:03 PM
kingschosen posted...
And, I clearly said that they were directions for the Jews at that time and done for the sake of preservation of God.

I did not say that mass murder was okay in the name of God in any arbitrary circumstance. During this particular time and these given circumstances, the Jews were ordered by God to do this.


So in this particular case, mass murder of innocents was fine, because it was God's orders?
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My folk band - http://barfota.bandcamp.com/
#10DiranosaurPosted 5/25/2011 5:00:56 PM
kingschosen posted...
Diranosaur posted...
Wouldn't this rule be the same today?

This is what I mean by taking my comment out of context. I blatantly made it clear as to whom the directions were for.


The relevance is up for debate. It doesn't specify a certain period of time, just that this is the law of God considering the subject. Yes, it does apply to the Jews only, but not a particular case.
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My folk band - http://barfota.bandcamp.com/