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Argument for the existence of God: religious belief is built into humans.

#1BladeKnifePosted 5/25/2011 7:13:36 PM
http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/05/12/religious-belief-is-human-nature-huge-new-study-claims/?hpt=C1

Although exact interpretations vary, humans are hardwired to believe in gods and the divine. If you want to argue against this using modern biology, please explain how this would be beneficial for natural selection. There's no biological benefit from this belief.

That's pretty good evidence, I'd say.
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#2hamsandwich3141Posted 5/25/2011 7:16:52 PM
As long as it is not detrimental, natural selection will not weed it out.
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#3BetaSquadronPosted 5/25/2011 7:18:59 PM
Couple things wrong.

First off, learn 2 logic. It's evidence for belief in God being innate. It's not evidence for God existing. There's a huge difference.

Secondly, in response to this:

"We tend to see purpose in the world," Oxford University professor Roger Trigg said Thursday. "We see agency. We think that something is there even if you can't see it. ... All this tends to build up to a religious way of thinking."

Humans also naturally see faces where there aren't any. It should be no shock that humans are wrong and misapply concepts all the time.
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#4OzymandiasIVPosted 5/25/2011 7:23:13 PM(edited)
BetaSquadron posted...
Couple things wrong.

First off, learn 2 logic. It's evidence for belief in God being innate. It's not evidence for God existing. There's a huge difference.

Secondly, in response to this:

"We tend to see purpose in the world," Oxford University professor Roger Trigg said Thursday. "We see agency. We think that something is there even if you can't see it. ... All this tends to build up to a religious way of thinking."

Humans also naturally see faces where there aren't any. It should be no shock that humans are wrong and misapply concepts all the time.


I agree with this post completely

I was just thinking, too; as children, we're much more likely to believe in things such as fairies, monsters, magic, etc. Some people even continue to believe in certain things well into adulthood, like the Loch Ness monster, Big Foot, or even fairies and such.

Is that evidence that any of those things are true? If not, I don't see why the same shoul apply to religion or God.
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#5DagorhaPosted 5/25/2011 7:20:46 PM
That is circumstantial at best and at worst you have misinterpreted the idea of divine being attributed to God. Although with that said this idea isn't new. Jung at a similar thought when forming his archetypes.
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#6OzymandiasIVPosted 5/25/2011 7:36:37 PM(edited)
Wait, wait, wait, I've got an issue with this article. Let's look at something here.

Trigg is co-director of the three-year Oxford-based project, which incorporated more than 40 different studies by dozens of researchers looking at countries from China to Poland and the United States to Micronesia.

Studies around the world came up with similar findings, including widespread belief in some kind of afterlife and an instinctive tendency to suggest that natural phenomena happen for a purpose.


Why would it be necessary to look to other countries to find out if religious belief is innate in humans? What are these "surveys"? It seems to me that they aren't actually doing studies on the brain, but are merely taking surveys on religious beliefs. I see nothing in that article that suggests that religious belief is built into humans, just that a hell of a lot of humans have religious beliefs, which is already well known and not at all surprising. Just because a lot of people have religious beliefs does not mean those beliefs are built into us.

I'd also argue whether it's an inherent instinct to suggest that natural phenomena happen for a purpose. I wouldn't say it's inherently instinctual, but more likely that their religious beliefs caused them to think so, and they got so used to it that it became near instinctual for them to jump to that conclusion.

"Children in particular found it very easy to think in religious ways," such as believing in God's omniscience, said Trigg. But adults also jumped first for explanations that implied an unseen agent at work in the world, the study found.

I don't see how this helps. It's like what I said above. Children also find it easier to believe in monsters and fairies and magic, and there are a number of adults that continue in those beliefs. And, of course, beliefs that are perpetuated by parents and that are told are fundamental to life and existence and your very essence and soul are much more likely to stick around than believing in some fat guy whose only purpose is to deliver presents to good kids once a year.

All I see is evidence that cultures the world over have developed religious beliefs and have spread them on to their children. The beliefs are so detrimental to everything they are and know that it'll be difficult to let go, and so most people don't. They should have asked if people, children or adults, believe in other such fanciful things; a few adults and many children likely would have.
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In order to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe.
You musn't be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling.
#7Faust_8Posted 5/25/2011 7:37:21 PM
The very same mechanism that allows us to recognize patterns and attribute causes from effects also makes us see patterns and causes that aren't there.

It's really very elementary. And would be selected for by natural selection.

The population that could notice, hey, everybody drinking from this water is getting sick or dying, maybe it's the water, will do better than the ones that don't pick up on it.

Of course, this also makes us go hey, a hurricane suddenly wiped out everything I knew. There must be something with a mind like mine behind it (because I don't know how nature and weather works).
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Religions tell children they might avoid hell...while science tells children they came from the stars.
#8wo0terPosted 5/25/2011 7:58:44 PM
Interesting, maybe it's Biological proof for the evidence of God, if not, what would be the purpose of this? How can we explain that the belief is Biologically ingrained within us?
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#9OrangeWizardPosted 5/25/2011 8:09:07 PM
Enforcer Of The Word posted...
Interesting, maybe it's Biological proof for the evidence of God, if not, what would be the purpose of this? How can we explain that the belief is Biologically ingrained within us?

Obviously one of our ancestors believed so hard that he imprinted his belief into his DNA, and thus, it was passed on as a dominate trait
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#10Adito99Posted 5/25/2011 8:51:52 PM
The fact that belief in God is hardwired to some extent is evidence against God...not evidence in His favor. Think about it, if it's hardwired then we'd believe even if He didn't exist so obviously whatever mechanism we're using to create the belief is not reliable.
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