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From a Christian standpoint: Is love eternal?

#11Julian_CaesarPosted 7/13/2011 10:48:46 PM
Souls are not eternal though. They can be destroyed, and will be, and have been.

Um...what? That's the DEFINITION of a soul. If it wasn't eternal, it'd be called the "mind."

Unless you're going to Heaven obviously. Then your soul is eternal. But not all souls.

Ahhh. So you believe in annihilation, rather than damnation? What's your biblical basis for that viewpoint? I'm not being snide, I'm genuinely asking...I have no issues with people holding differing theologies. God cares a LOT more about why you believe something than what you actually believe.

And no...you might see your wifes soul, but you aren't going to be able to go "Oh hey babe, you're here too huh ? Small world."

Again...what is your basis for believing something like that? Jesus makes many references to the kingdom of heaven being within us, and on earth as well. The Gospels and Paul seem to indicate that this life is not meant to merely be a proving ground for the future life, but as a dimly lit reflection of what life is going to be like once we're reunited with Jesus.

I do actually have some scriptural basis for believing that, but it's tucked away in a notebook somewhere. If you want to discuss it I'd be happy to look it up again.
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"I don't think you can run a double-blind experiment with an omniscient being as the subject." -- kozlo100
#12KeakealaniPosted 7/14/2011 12:14:54 AM
I think so, yes. Now, the love may be slightly different in heaven in the presence of God...not so much among friends and family, but for lovers and spouses. In heaven, the actual model for their romantic love will be revealed to them in full: the love that Christ has for the church, the body of believers. And so while their friendship and camaraderie will remain, I believe that all romantic love for each other will be rightfully replaced by our holy relationship with God.

I'd be interested in elaboration on this. I don't know much at all about Christianity, but this really appeals to me for some reason. What makes romantic love special to be replaced by one's relationship with God? And, although I suppose it's unanswerable, what is the relationship with God supposed to be like, anyway? Does Christ love believers more than non-believers? I don't mean to be disrespectful, just curious. It's aspects like this of Christianity that fascinate me, because they're kind of not the part of the dogma that outsiders hear much about.
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~Kea
#13ForsakenHermitPosted 7/14/2011 11:21:52 PM
The idea of loving everyone the same way in heaven sounds so dull. I'd rather be in love with my wife in hell then be just friends in heaven.
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#14KNessJMPosted 7/15/2011 6:46:56 AM
From a Buddhist and Taoist standpoint, no, love is not eternal. It is an emotion that comes and goes like any other.
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Quote of the Week: "He who is attached to things will suffer much."
#15Julian_CaesarPosted 7/22/2011 8:02:30 PM
What makes romantic love special to be replaced by one's relationship with God?

From a Christian standpoint, it's because romantic love was intended from the beginning to be a reflection of Jesus' love for the church. So the reason that this relationship will be replaced is because when we get to heaven, we will have the real thing. In some ways we have the "real thing" now since Jesus is "among us" in a spiritual sense, but when we are in heaven, Jesus will be the "husband" to the entire church with an even greater level of intimacy than we share with our earthly spouses in the here and now. And subsequently, the romantic relationship will be diminished because there will be no need for it. The purpose of marriage and intimacy on earth is to make us more holy; we will not need marriage in heaven because we will be spiritually intimate with everyone else (and especially Jesus) in a way that our mortal bodies do not permit on earth. And thus, perfectly holy.

This is an uncomfortable subject at times, because we generally associate romantic intimacy with sexuality. While it's a good thing to associate the two in marriage, it's difficult to separate out sexuality when we talk about "romantic" intimacy with Jesus. And this is especially true for men (well, for me it is lol). The key is in understanding that we cannot allow sexual thinking to color our perception of intimacy with God. Instead, we should allow our intimacy with God to color our perception of sexuality.

And, although I suppose it's unanswerable, what is the relationship with God supposed to be like, anyway? Does Christ love believers more than non-believers?

Hahaha...yes, that one is tough. Mostly because everyone's answer will be different anyway, and partly because faith is not something easily put into words. It's not quantifiable by any measure, it's not describable by color or height or weight or BMI, and it's not orderly in any sense of the word. To quote several authors and a popular song, it's "more like falling in love than something to believe in." Of course, that's partly my perception...I'm something of a touchy-feely person, so God approaches me in a touchy-feely manner. And yet, He is not going to be unapproachable just because you aren't someone who feels emotions strongly, the way I do. Rather, your relationship would take on a less emotional tone, perhaps one steeped in duty and respect. That's not to say I don't respect God, it's just I don't experience that aspect of relationship as strongly as someone else might.

I don't mean to be disrespectful, just curious. It's aspects like this of Christianity that fascinate me, because they're kind of not the part of the dogma that outsiders hear much about.

Well it's also true that most Christians don't make these sorts of associations on a regular basis, and so when asked about them they fall back upon more dogmatic responses. However, what has really stuck in my mind the last few years is that all the philosophy in the world doesn't make up for an unwilling spirit. I can know more theology than the rest of the church, and still be just as sinful.

What I mean is that dogma isn't necessarily all bad. There are people who have perhaps neither time nor ability to pursue theology beyond that which they need to live a meaningful, productive life. For them, "dogma" is sufficient to keep them out of sin and on the straight and narrow path. Now, I believe that each should pursue God to the fullest of their abilities...so if you have the time and/or ability, you ought to do so. Dogma is only a bad thing when someone accepts it out of intellectual laziness.
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"I don't think you can run a double-blind experiment with an omniscient being as the subject." -- kozlo100