This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

Question for christians who accept evolutionary theory

#1anavriNPosted 11/23/2012 6:30:35 AM
I quickly skimmed through the responses of cyclonekruse's demographic poll, and I noticed that, with two exceptions, all christians accept evolution as the best explanation for the diversity of life.

That's pretty awesome. But now I wonder, how does this effect your image of God? Do you experience cognitive dissonance for believing in a benevolent and omnipotent god who uses such a slow and cruel process to create life, or do you think there is a good/necessary reason why God did this? Finally, do you think neuroscience is the best explanation for consciousness, or does this require a supernatural element (i.e. soul)?

Thanks in advance for answering!
---
§ 157. Der Gedanke an den Selbstmord ist ein starkes Trostmittel: mit ihm kommt man gut über manche böse Nacht hinweg.
#2SirThinkALotPosted 11/23/2012 10:42:59 AM
I dont think the speed of creation is overly relevant. I mean just because God could create the universe in 6 days, doesnt mean he is obligated to. Hell, for that matter, why does he need 6 days? God could have created the universe in half-a-nanosecond...or even less.

The fact that evolution occurs based on the 'survival of the fittest' is perhaps more problamatic. I could see how somebody might think that it conflicts with the idea of God's goodness. But I think God has his reasons for how he did things. To be honest its not something I consider particularly important.

Finally, do you think neuroscience is the best explanation for consciousness, or does this require a supernatural element (i.e. soul)?


Thats a...complicated question. I think neuroscience can explain a lot, but I'm not sure if it can explain exactly what makes me 'me.' Although even if it could show that, it wouldnt be overly problematic for me. Although I'm not really a dualist in the classical sense.
---
Learn real history and economics at liberty Classroom
http://www.libertyclassroom.com/dap/a/?a=1305
#3Polish_CrusaderPosted 11/23/2012 3:29:59 PM
The worst part about evolution is the lack of inbetween skeletons. Like on that diagram of the ape turning into the human. Dont you think we would have millions of half ape, half human corpses? This is why i know evolution never existed because no scientist can find them. There is only ape corpses and human corpses.

Spiritually speaking, evolution is godless and completely marginalizes the divine creation that our race actually is. We were given dominion over this planet and all the life on it for a reason. We were made in gods image (literally). Evolution does not explain so many things in uncountable. Why are asians, africans, and central americans completely different looking when all live next to the equator? Because there are genealogical factors that speciation cannot effect. Skin tone is affected by geopgraphic region, obviously.

In the end, evolution just does not make sense. Gods story of creation in genesis is just fine with me. I am content.
#4ThuggernautzPosted 11/23/2012 3:42:44 PM
Polish_Crusader posted...
I am content.


Content with ignorance? Fair enough.
#5fudrickPosted 11/23/2012 3:55:00 PM
Polish_Crusader posted...
The worst part about evolution is the lack of inbetween skeletons. Like on that diagram of the ape turning into the human. Dont you think we would have millions of half ape, half human corpses? This is why i know evolution never existed because no scientist can find them. There is only ape corpses and human corpses.

Spiritually speaking, evolution is godless and completely marginalizes the divine creation that our race actually is. We were given dominion over this planet and all the life on it for a reason. We were made in gods image (literally). Evolution does not explain so many things in uncountable. Why are asians, africans, and central americans completely different looking when all live next to the equator? Because there are genealogical factors that speciation cannot effect. Skin tone is affected by geopgraphic region, obviously.

In the end, evolution just does not make sense. Gods story of creation in genesis is just fine with me. I am content.


This is a new Poe, right?
---
Best FCs:
GH1: Decontrol | GH2: Jordan, Hangar 18 | GH80s: Because It's Midnite | GH3: One, Soothsayer | RB2: I Ain't Superstitious
#6gamesrgreatPosted 11/23/2012 3:56:59 PM
I would definitely ask about how it affects their view on God considering the traditional Christian narrative has death enter in after Creation as a result of sin but science tells us death would be a part of the evolutionary creative process to reach man. Also would say a lot about god that he feels that is the way to do things rather than just make humans. It also raises the question of why he would do that and then tell his Genesis account the way he did. People may say he adjusted it to fit the people he was talking to but the story doesn't hint at evolution as others do such as the Korean myth about a bear turning into a man or the beliefs certain people have about man being descended from wolves. I suppose you could argue that the dust becoming people is symbolic of the nonliving matter grouping up and eventually giving rise to life but that seems like a stretch
---
D-Jesus, Christ Bosh, King James 3:16
The Miami Heat 2012 Champs- Miller Time
#7SirThinkALotPosted 11/23/2012 8:43:07 PM
gamesrgreat posted...
I would definitely ask about how it affects their view on God considering the traditional Christian narrative has death enter in after Creation as a result of sin but science tells us death would be a part of the evolutionary creative process to reach man.


This is a good question. While the Bible does indicate that death(at least for humans) came as a result of sin, I think that is legendary and can be seen as representing what happens to our spirits when we turn from God.

It also raises the question of why he would do that and then tell his Genesis account the way he did. People may say he adjusted it to fit the people he was talking to but the story doesn't hint at evolution as others do such as the Korean myth about a bear turning into a man or the beliefs certain people have about man being descended from wolves. I suppose you could argue that the dust becoming people is symbolic of the nonliving matter grouping up and eventually giving rise to life but that seems like a stretch


I actually dont think Genesis was ever meant as a literal 'this is what happened' type story. I see it as legendary. It shows us something about the nature of God and his relationship to humanity, and it can be read symbolically, but it dont need be taken as even trying to represent reality.
---
Learn real history and economics at liberty Classroom
http://www.libertyclassroom.com/dap/a/?a=1305
#8countzanderPosted 11/23/2012 8:54:36 PM
Just because something is the best explanation doesn't mean it's true. I mean, before the big bang was theorized, scientist kinda just thought the universe may have always existed, with no beginning. At the time, they had little reason to believe otherwise so they didn't.

That doesn't mean current theories are untrustworthy or that science should just unquestionably replace spiritual belief. But it does mean we shouldn't dogmatically accept a position, religious or not. "Either Christianity or science" is a false dichotomy.
---
http://i.imgur.com/k1nGh.jpg
#9bfslick50Posted 11/23/2012 10:22:24 PM(edited)
I don't see how the speed of evolution is important when it comes to God & creation. I also don't see how evolution is any more cruel than the alternative. No matter what you believe, creatures die all the time and quite often from unjust causes. Whether or not you believe in evolution, species do go extinct, see the dodo. Evolution adds nothing cruel to the picture. Evolution is just the simple fact that species change over time.

Also, Polish Crusader, you should learn how a fossil is made before you make a claim of expected frequency that we should be finding them.
---
"Something's wrong! Murder isn't working and that's all we're good at." ~Futurama
#10SirThinkALotPosted 11/23/2012 10:45:33 PM
Also, Polish Crusader, you should learn how a fossil is made before you make a claim of expected frequency that we should be finding them.


Not to mention all the political issues involved with searching for them. Archaeologists dont just go around digging wherever they please. They have to arrange to start a dig, usually with the government of the country they want to search in. And not all countries are overly cooperative in allowing such things. For example throughout much of the Middle East, its virtually impossible to get permission to dig. China not only limits who and where people can dig, but also what and how much can be brought out of the country.

In short, even when optimal fossil conditions DO occur, we might not find them because people arent allowed to search where they're at. And thats not even considering fossils that were destroyed by construction and mining and such....
---
Learn real history and economics at liberty Classroom
http://www.libertyclassroom.com/dap/a/?a=1305