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So banning God from school allows things like Clumbine and Newtown...

#21Heineken14Posted 2/6/2013 6:25:34 AM
From: AdmiralBison | #020
I don't think it's really just about this false idea going around that Christians can't pray in school, I thinks it's the growing secularism in general public society that drives the fear for many Christians.


Again, it's not denying you from doing anything on your own or your own property, it's merely having the government not endorse one singular religion. No one's rights are being infringed when we don't put the 10 commandments in courts or force kids to say a prayer at school.
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#22Magyar15Posted 2/6/2013 9:26:04 AM
Heineken14 posted...
From: AdmiralBison | #020
I don't think it's really just about this false idea going around that Christians can't pray in school, I thinks it's the growing secularism in general public society that drives the fear for many Christians.


Again, it's not denying you from doing anything on your own or your own property, it's merely having the government not endorse one singular religion. No one's rights are being infringed when we don't put the 10 commandments in courts or force kids to say a prayer at school.


There is a big difference between the government forcibly putting the ten commandments in a classroom, and forcibly taking them out...
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#23AynRandySavagePosted 2/6/2013 2:33:33 PM
Magyar15 posted...
Heineken14 posted...
From: AdmiralBison | #020
I don't think it's really just about this false idea going around that Christians can't pray in school, I thinks it's the growing secularism in general public society that drives the fear for many Christians.


Again, it's not denying you from doing anything on your own or your own property, it's merely having the government not endorse one singular religion. No one's rights are being infringed when we don't put the 10 commandments in courts or force kids to say a prayer at school.


There is a big difference between the government forcibly putting the ten commandments in a classroom, and forcibly taking them out...


Yes, the first one is unconstitutional, the second is the solution to that problem.
#24Magyar15Posted 2/6/2013 3:21:28 PM
The first doesn't happen, the second does. The ten commandments were put in as decorations by individuals, not as as a mandate by the government. The government mandate came because people have trouble tolerating religion....
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A good man would prefer to be defeated than to defeat injustice by evil means - Sallust
#25lastheroPosted 2/6/2013 3:36:08 PM
It doesn't matter who put it up, it's on school property and subject to the same restrictions, so it has to come down. Just because you're not the government doesn't mean you're allowed to haul a giant cross into the middle of a school and expect it to be left alone.

And people don't 'have trouble tolerating' religion. Most Americans are religious themselves. But we have a constitution, and that constitution says that there is a separation between church and state. If you have a problem with that, there are plenty of fine Christian schools that aren't government funded, which you can send your children to. Just don't expect tax dollars to pay for endorsement of your religion.
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#26AynRandySavagePosted 2/6/2013 3:39:57 PM
Magyar15 posted...
The first doesn't happen, the second does. The ten commandments were put in as decorations by individuals, not as as a mandate by the government...


Individuals acting as representatives of the government.
#27Magyar15Posted 2/6/2013 3:42:52 PM
lasthero posted...

But we have a constitution, and that constitution says that there is a separation between church and state.


No, it doesn't. And not allowing people to decorate with religious symbols, to me seems far more to be prohibiting the free exercise of religion, than allowing people to put up religious symbols, does to establish a religion. Because they happen to work on government property seems to be a trivial distinction
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#28fudrickPosted 2/6/2013 3:46:59 PM
Magyar15 posted...
There is a big difference between the government forcibly putting the ten commandments in a classroom, and forcibly taking them out...


Heineken didn't say anything about the ten commandments in a classroom. He said something about ten commandments in courts. And that certainly does happen:

http://edition.cnn.com/2003/LAW/08/21/ten.commandments/
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#29fudrickPosted 2/6/2013 3:48:50 PM
Magyar15 posted...
No, it doesn't. And not allowing people to decorate with religious symbols, to me seems far more to be prohibiting the free exercise of religion, than allowing people to put up religious symbols, does to establish a religion. Because they happen to work on government property seems to be a trivial distinction


Surely you support the right of teachers to decorate their classrooms with Satanic art and objects, right?
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#30AynRandySavagePosted 2/6/2013 3:52:30 PM
Magyar15 posted...

No, it doesn't. And not allowing people to decorate with religious symbols, to me seems far more to be prohibiting the free exercise of religion, than allowing people to put up religious symbols, does to establish a religion. Because they happen to work on government property seems to be a trivial distinction


School teachers are authority figures. By displaying religious images in their classrooms for non-secular reasons, they're abusing their position.