This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

Should Creationism be taught alongside Evolution in science class?

#51cyclonekrusePosted 2/27/2013 5:28:51 PM
I think you're on to something with "teaching about" only acknowledges it exists and aims to describe it. And I also agree that it doesn't comment on the actual veracity of the subject at hand.

But I think there's something else to "teaching X." If I teach someone karate, I am not saying that karate is "true" really. "Teaching karate" seems to be short for "teaching how to do karate." That's where I get the "hands-on" connotation from the word. However, in other cases such as "teaching WWI history" that doesn't work. So maybe "teaching X" has two connotations that are tangling me here. Teaching how to do X and teaching X as true.
---
Locke: "Why do you find it so hard to believe?" || Jack "Why do you find it so easy?!" ||
Locke: "It's never been easy!"
#52Moorish_IdolPosted 2/27/2013 7:23:37 PM
Maybe those two sub-connotations are "Teaching how to do (karate)" and "Teaching how to be (a Creationist)"?
#53UnfairRepresent(Topic Creator)Posted 2/28/2013 5:09:11 AM
Guys, go look up Self-Fulfilling prophecy
---
^ Hey now that's completely unfair.
http://i.imgur.com/45yVrRr.jpg
#54Faust_8Posted 2/28/2013 8:01:40 AM
Moorish_Idol posted...
Kozlo makes a good point.

To those in the opposition: are you against learning about Creationism in school?


The thing of it is, shouldn't they already know about it if they're going to at all? I mean, that's KIND of the point of church and your parents.

To me, teaching about creationism has as much point as school teaching you how to make your bed--it's just not the school's responsibility, that's a family matter.

By the time teaching about creationism would enter the curriculum (you can't exactly do it at kindergarten) they would already know about it if the parents cared at all about the issue. If you think your religion/beliefs are true you don't wait around to let the school do it.
---
You are the universe
Expressing itself as a human, for a little while
#55SSj4WingzeroPosted 2/28/2013 8:18:21 AM
I'm not against teaching "about" creationism. Students should learn about the world around them and what other people believe. Similarly, I'm not against teaching about the major world religions out there, because the role of religion in mathematics, science, history, politics, and just about every single discipline out there cannot be understated.
---
Not changing this sig until the Knicks win the NBA Championship! Started...4/23/2011? Or was it 2010?
#56UnfairRepresent(Topic Creator)Posted 2/28/2013 8:58:01 AM
No one looked it up
---
^ Hey now that's completely unfair.
http://i.imgur.com/45yVrRr.jpg
#57kozlo100Posted 2/28/2013 9:10:35 AM
Faust_8 posted...
The thing of it is, shouldn't they already know about it if they're going to at all? I mean, that's KIND of the point of church and your parents.


See, I think that's where the language is influencing things. It's the parents' responsibility to teach their kids creationism if they believe it's true.

It's the school's job to teach the kids about creationism as part of educating them on cultural and historical subjects. Not all school kids are Christian, but there is value in all school kids knowing what Christians, and those of other faiths, believe. Including creationism is just part of teaching about those beliefs.
---
Time flies like the wind,
and fruit flies like a banana.
#58Moorish_IdolPosted 2/28/2013 10:48:56 AM
Faust_8 posted...
Moorish_Idol posted...
Kozlo makes a good point.

To those in the opposition: are you against learning about Creationism in school?


The thing of it is, shouldn't they already know about it if they're going to at all? I mean, that's KIND of the point of church and your parents.

To me, teaching about creationism has as much point as school teaching you how to make your bed--it's just not the school's responsibility, that's a family matter.

By the time teaching about creationism would enter the curriculum (you can't exactly do it at kindergarten) they would already know about it if the parents cared at all about the issue. If you think your religion/beliefs are true you don't wait around to let the school do it.


I don't see why only the religious would want to learn about it. There are plenty of people who have an interest in religious history or rituals who are not religious themselves. Some of these people may very well have not previously learned the details of creationism.

I look at it like a European History course. You don't need to be European to have an interest in it.
#59Faust_8Posted 2/28/2013 12:11:21 PM
UnfairRepresent posted...
No one looked it up


Because:

1) We know what that means.

2) I still don't see the relevance.
---
You are the universe
Expressing itself as a human, for a little while
#60Faust_8Posted 2/28/2013 12:13:30 PM
Faust_8 posted...
Moorish_Idol posted...
Kozlo makes a good point.

To those in the opposition: are you against learning about Creationism in school?


The thing of it is, shouldn't they already know about it if they're going to at all? I mean, that's KIND of the point of church and your parents.

To me, teaching about creationism has as much point as school teaching you how to make your bed--it's just not the school's responsibility, that's a family matter.

By the time teaching about creationism would enter the curriculum (you can't exactly do it at kindergarten) they would already know about it if the parents cared at all about the issue. If you think your religion/beliefs are true you don't wait around to let the school do it.


I admit when I wrote this I was thinking along the lines of the basic curriculum. If it's a separate class, that's fine, but teaching "about" creationism is dumb to have in the basic curriculum that everyone takes.

A separate class is just fine though, but it would probably be a class that covers what ALL the major religions say.
---
You are the universe
Expressing itself as a human, for a little while