This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

creationists: should creationism be taught in science classes?

#11NN0VAT0RPosted 9/23/2013 10:49:38 AM
I always thought at most it can be taught as part of literature, but science is a completely different field. if the values of creationism is all written in a single book, then literature class should take care of it.
also, which version of creationism should be taught in class? should every religion get equal representation when discussion creationism?
---
"The world might have been created last Thursday how would we know the difference?"
Save game/Load game
#2MasterSplinterWPosted 9/23/2013 11:52:37 AM
I'm not religious at all, and I've no problem with Creationism being mentioned in classes. How much attention it gets? IDK. I am, however, very against something like pushing a Christian agenda.
---
ARR, Diabolos: Ryan Zilla, Tank
#3Moorish_IdolPosted 9/23/2013 12:21:42 PM
If they discussed every religion's creation story, nothing else would be taught that year.
#4kozlo100Posted 9/23/2013 12:37:11 PM
Moorish_Idol posted...
If they discussed every religion's creation story, nothing else would be taught that year.


That's why you devote a whole class to it, and call it 'world religions' or something similar. Though that said, I'm not sure there's really room in the high school curriculum for that kind of class. Bigger fish to fry in those years. Maybe as an elective though.
---
Time flies like the wind,
and fruit flies like a banana.
#5MasterSplinterWPosted 9/23/2013 12:49:13 PM
kozlo100 posted...
Moorish_Idol posted...
If they discussed every religion's creation story, nothing else would be taught that year.


That's why you devote a whole class to it, and call it 'world religions' or something similar. Though that said, I'm not sure there's really room in the high school curriculum for that kind of class. Bigger fish to fry in those years. Maybe as an elective though.


idk, whether one agrees with religion or not, it would appear to be a very large part of our culture and society that high schools choose to be ignoring
---
ARR, Diabolos: Ryan Zilla, Tank
#6master_gamr1231Posted 9/23/2013 12:54:13 PM
MasterSplinterW posted...
kozlo100 posted...
Moorish_Idol posted...
If they discussed every religion's creation story, nothing else would be taught that year.


That's why you devote a whole class to it, and call it 'world religions' or something similar. Though that said, I'm not sure there's really room in the high school curriculum for that kind of class. Bigger fish to fry in those years. Maybe as an elective though.


idk, whether one agrees with religion or not, it would appear to be a very large part of our culture and society that high schools choose to be ignoring


It still has no place in science classes. Does it have a place at all? Sure, in religion or maybe sociology classes. But religious myths have nothing to do with science.
---
Why do people... betray one another? They might as well... all just die instead.
Welcome to my kingdom!
#7kozlo100Posted 9/23/2013 1:01:01 PM
MasterSplinterW posted...
idk, whether one agrees with religion or not, it would appear to be a very large part of our culture and society that high schools choose to be ignoring


I agree, it's just that high schools seem to be having trouble teaching even the basics these days. More focus on that takes precedence over cultural-type classes, in my opinion. For example, a home economics class is going to be more practical and useful than a comparative religions one.
---
Time flies like the wind,
and fruit flies like a banana.
#8JonWood007Posted 9/23/2013 1:02:37 PM
I used to think so when I was a Christian, but in science classes? No. Because creationism is not science. here's a useful link I just found on reddit that explains the difference between creationism and other pseudosciences and actual science.

http://www.csicop.org/si/show/playing_by_the_rules

I do think that yeah, it could be taught in other subjects, like philosophy, or world religions, or perhaps that they should maybe have one of those 1/3 page text blocks in a science book dedicated to alternate views, but that's about it. It shouldn't be treated equally, or like real science, because it isn't real science.
---
Desktop: Phenom II X4 965 | 8 GB DDR3 | GTX 580 | 1 TB HDD | W7 | 650W Antec | 1600x900
Laptop: A6 3400m | 4 GB DDR3 | HD 6520g | 500 GB HDD | W7 | 1366x768
#9DarkContractorPosted 9/23/2013 1:06:30 PM
Yes, we should put all the testable evidence for creationism. We should also have a section containing all the problems with the theory of evolution.

Smirk
#10ElderMisanthropyPosted 9/23/2013 3:55:36 PM
Because I believe the population of actual creationists here to be minuscule, I'll throw in my non-believing two cents:

No, it should not be taught in science classes. No more than alchemy, astrology, crystal healing, and so on. Regardless of whether or not you believe it to be accurate, there's no denying that it fails to present testable, verifiable claims, and its observations are little more than poorly-conceived arguments plagued with fallacious reasoning and an overwhelming dependency on ignorance.
---
Marriage is when men and women pair off and live together.