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What is the first book you recommend someone read PRIOR

#11DiScOrD tHe LuNaTiCPosted 6/6/2014 9:08:13 AM(edited)
Just when dealing with Christians who are 'asking', I advise reading Mere Christianity or The Age of Reason. If they still want more, The Screwtape Letters. And if they still want more, Why Christianity Must Change or Die.

All four of those, particularly Age of Reason, had a profound effect on me.
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"Jon Jones and Bendo just slaying mother f***ers in the name of the lord" -- MICHALECOLE
#12WhereDidItGoPosted 6/6/2014 12:09:48 PM
I would probably have to say Chesterton's Orthodoxy.
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"The madman is not the man who has lost his reason. The madman is the man who has lost everything except his reason." - G.K. Chesterton
#13Moorish_IdolPosted 6/6/2014 12:49:40 PM
DiScOrD tHe LuNaTiC posted...
Just when dealing with Christians who are 'asking', I advise reading Mere Christianity or The Age of Reason. If they still want more, The Screwtape Letters. And if they still want more, Why Christianity Must Change or Die.

All four of those, particularly Age of Reason, had a profound effect on me.

How does the Age of Reason answer Christian questions in particular?
#14JonWood007Posted 6/6/2014 1:56:26 PM
Age of Reason pretty much attempts to debunk Christianity, not defend it.
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#15Moorish_IdolPosted 6/6/2014 3:14:52 PM(edited)
JonWood007 posted...
Age of Reason pretty much attempts to debunk Christianity, not defend it.

Yeah, that's why I was wondering why he suggested it alongside books like Mere Christianity. Unless he meant to get both sides of the issue, which is fair enough.
#16darkmaian23Posted 6/7/2014 12:11:28 AM
Any book or textbook on world religions would make a good primer. Texts and commentaries related to the religions of interest could then be sought.
#17DiScOrD tHe LuNaTiCPosted 6/7/2014 11:54:40 AM
Moorish_Idol posted...
JonWood007 posted...
Age of Reason pretty much attempts to debunk Christianity, not defend it.

Yeah, that's why I was wondering why he suggested it alongside books like Mere Christianity. Unless he meant to get both sides of the issue, which is fair enough.


Which is what I meant, perhaps could have been clearer in that regard.

In particular, I was struck by the way Paine dissects the Israelites vs. the Caananites as being 'God's will'. He basically said(and I agree) that any God who would demand the slaughter of his own creations isn't a god at all, he's a despot, and not worthy of being worshipped.

It's all about people using "God" as their justification for things.
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"Jon Jones and Bendo just slaying mother f***ers in the name of the lord" -- MICHALECOLE
#18mercurydudePosted 6/8/2014 3:26:22 PM
TheOlJollyRoger posted...
So what would you offer a young adult to present them the opportunity to consider spiritual options but without the this is it style of main religions.

I would like something that opens all doors and closes none. ( that can come later)


I would definitely recommend some Joseph Campbell, Hero with a Thousand Faces or Myths To Live By. It's really hard to go wrong with him.

But if this isn't limited to the book format, better still would be his Power of Myth video series (you can watch it on youtube), which is very accessible since it's just an interview/conversation with Bill Moyers. It's sort of like a Cosmos on myth, religion, and spirituality, just without the fancy special effects.
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"It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself."
- Thomas Jefferson, writing on the subject of religion
#19Julian_CaesarPosted 6/11/2014 9:18:23 PM
DiScOrD tHe LuNaTiC posted...
In particular, I was struck by the way Paine dissects the Israelites vs. the Caananites as being 'God's will'. He basically said(and I agree) that any God who would demand the slaughter of his own creations isn't a god at all, he's a despot, and not worthy of being worshipped.


Just curious, how do you feel about Paul's New Testament teaching concerning the potter and the clay? Wanting to reject the OT God because of his apparent barbarism is, I think, a natural response given the more socially advanced culture we live in. But it's a bold step to say that the potter is no longer a potter if he smashes some of the jars that He created. Do you think God wasn't the true Supreme Creator after all? Or do you think that His actions are simply too "wrong" to allow yourself to worship Him anymore?

It's all about people using "God" as their justification for things.


Now that, I agree with. My only concern is that if you disagree with Scripture to the point that God is no longer God, then you have to fall back on other morality/truth as justification to condemn the bad things that people do. Which is fine for a lot of things, I suppose; the problem occurs when there is need of a tiebreaker.
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#20Omnipotent_CowPosted 6/12/2014 4:39:22 AM
The Critique of Pure Reason