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Completely new to WoW and MMOs in general

#1TheTrueNubPosted 3/19/2013 8:49:58 PM(edited)
I might starting this game soon and I have a some questions.

Is it even reasonable to come into WoW as a completely new player at this point?

Are warriors or paladins good for beginners? The tanking role appeals to me the most, with healing being the least interesting. I don't really have any feelings towards DPS.

Is WoW in general a good MMO to start with?

Are there any reccomended servers for newer players?

How do I experience the content from each expansion pack? As in, how can I do all of vanilla's stuff, then do Burning Crusade stuff and so on. I want to go through as much as possible and do it in order and know the story and lore. What would be the estimated time-frame for me to do this?

How does one get gear and loot? I'm not exactly sure how gear is distributed in MMOs.

Sorry for all the questions, this game is just so large at this point it's so overwhelming looking from the outside in.
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#2MorgasaurusPosted 3/19/2013 8:57:04 PM
If you're new to MMOs there is no better place to start than WoW.
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#3ljgfPosted 3/19/2013 8:58:03 PM
Your name is appropriate for this topic.

Anyway, yes, it is perfectly fine to start playing WoW now. I've never played a warrior and I've only played a paladin up to about level 30, so I'm not an expert on either, but I think they're both pretty good classes for new players. The way class roles work is that you pick a specialization at level 10 (which you can change at any time by paying some gold to a class trainer) and that determines what role you'll be best suited for. At level 30 you unlock the dual talent specialization feature, which means that you can switch between two different specs basically whenever you want. It's a good way to try out different roles on the same character.

I think WoW is a good MMO to start with, yeah. It's a classic, and at least half the MMOs out there are heavily influenced by it. Not everyone will agree, but I think WoW is still a lot of fun and that it's aged pretty well.



The only thing I have to say about servers is that you should avoid the ones that are tagged as for new players. They're typically low population and don't have great communities. Stick to regular servers with medium-high population, I think that'll give you the best experience as a new player.

The order that you experience content from each era of WoW is the same as the order in which the expansions were released. So you'll do all the vanilla content from 1-58 (well, Cataclysm revamped most of the vanilla zones, but whatever), then you'll go do Burning Crusade stuff in Outland until 68, then you go to Northrend to do Wrath of the Lich King content from 68-80, then you go to various previously unexplored areas on the vanilla continents for Cataclysm from 80-85, and finally you head down to Pandaria for the current expansion from 85-90. The amount of time it takes will vary a lot depending on how efficiently you're trying to level. I'm not really sure about the number of hours it'll be.

The continuity of the story does get pretty screwy since each expansion occurs sequentially in the lore and areas from old expansions aren't really updated to reflect new events. Here's an example of that: let's say you play a Draenei warrior. You'll start out at the beginning of BC, when the Draenei just crashed on Azeroth (and at the same time, there's a Pandaren monk in the starting area as a class trainer, while they shouldn't be there until years after the Draenei have recovered from the crash and moved on). Then you jump forward in time to Cataclysm/Vanilla, then you jump back to BC, then you continue linearly. It's weird, just go with it.



As for gear and loot, it's pretty straightforward. While leveling, your main source of gear will be from quest rewards and occasionally random drops from monsters if you get lucky. Dungeon/raid bosses will always drop gear; you'll be killing them with a group of other players, and you essentially roll dice to determine who gets it. You can choose to roll based on need or on greed, and need always trumps greed. Here's a tip: learn what kind of gear is appropriate for your class, and only Need on things that are actually useful to you. Don't be that obnoxious hunter or warrior who thinks he should be wearing intellect armor.


Well, that was a long post. Hope it's useful to you.
#4DawnshadowPosted 3/19/2013 9:01:36 PM
TheTrueNub posted...
I might starting this game soon and I have a some questions.

Is it even reasonable to come into WoW as a completely new player at this point?


It's reasonable, but at the same time there are a lot of stupid elitists out there, and being a new tank will get you a lot of idiots expecting new players to know how to play without ever actually playing.... somehow. That said, as long as you have a quick skin and don't let the idiots get to you, you'll be fine.

Are warriors or paladins good for beginners? The tanking role appeals to me the most, with healing being the least interesting. I don't really have any feelings towards DPS.


They're both good choices; warriors are very mobile, paladins have a lot of group utility and can heal themselves pretty well. If you're undecided, play one of each to level 20 and see how you like it.

I would suggest trying out healing at some point if you plan to tank, though, even if you don't take it all the way to level cap. Even a little experience will make you more aware of issues like positioning and mana. (Especially if you choose warrior-- healers can only heal targets in a certain range, and with a warrior's mobility it's easy to get ahead of your healer.)

Is WoW in general a good MMO to start with?


It's very smooth, very polished, but the storytelling isn't quite as good as some of the newer MMOs out there-- it's decent, but not great. The leveling process is also incredibly long-- they have made it faster, but 90 levels is a lot.

Are there any reccomended servers for newer players? I'm in Kentucky and would prefer the lowest latency possible.


For latency, look up where the data centers for each server is located.

The servers labeled "new players" tend to be very low population; you want to look into the server before you choose one. Avoid PvP servers like the plague unless you know what you're getting into-- they can be fun if you're prepared, but they tend to be full of bored people at maximum level randomly killing lower level characters for their own amusement. And as character growth is exponential, you won't stand a chance for a very long time.

I'd actually suggest looking into an RP server, even if you have no plans to roleplay, as long as you can respect the people roleplaying-- basically, as long as you don't disrupt in character events, you're fine. I've found the general population to be more mature than PvE/PvP servers. Roleplaying is when someone actually pretends to be their character, and acts out their actions. It's actually quite fun.

How do I experience the content from each expansion pack? As in, how can I do all of vanilla's stuff, then do Burning Crusade stuff and so on. I want to go through as much as possible and do it in order and know the story and lore. What would be the estimated time-frame for me to do this?


There are guilds out there that lock level at each expansion's plateau to do the content at level; you could probably find one. Otherwise, you can quest through most of the content and queue up for the 5-man dungeons; for the raids, you could either get into one of the retro guilds, tag along on a costume gear run, or level to cap, then go back and do the old content. It would take a /very/ long time to do every quest in the game, though-- there's actually a title called Loremaster for doing it.

Running out of room, continued in another post.
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#5DawnshadowPosted 3/19/2013 9:06:34 PM
How does one get gear and loot? I'm not exactly sure how gear is distributed in MMOs.


For quests or items sold by vendors, you just pick the item you want. In dungeons you have the option to need or greed on gear; need beats greed. Generally, you roll need if the item if it's an upgrade for your current role. If it's an upgrade for your inactive role, you wait and see if anyone with that role active needs it first, then you can need if they pass (or if you're the only one who CAN use it.) However, there are a LOT of jerks who will need anything they can, just for the sake of being annoying.

Raids-- groups larger than 5-- have a lot of ways of dealing with loot. Some use just need before greed. Some have it given to the person for whom it does the most good, decided by a group of officers. Some use a system where loot is bought with points granted by the raid leader for participation. There are even gold runs where gear is auctioned for gold, then at the end of the run the pot is split evenly between all the participants. All of these ways have their advantages and disadvantages.

Sorry for all the questions, this game is just so large at this point it's so overwhelming looking from the outside in.


I know. I thought it was complicated four years ago....
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I have a blog! Warcraft and other gamer musings.
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