AP Calculus: Barron's or Princeton Review?

#1EmeralDragon23Posted 9/28/2009 10:50:37 AM
Which one should I get?
#2BashyMcFetusPosted 9/28/2009 11:32:28 AM
Neither. So long as you still have access to a traditional calculus book, that's your best bet for reviewing.
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#3ManocheesePosted 9/28/2009 12:50:52 PM
^That.
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#4iLUVcheez383Posted 9/28/2009 1:51:51 PM
Princeton.
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#5Ben KenobiPosted 9/28/2009 2:20:40 PM
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#6scannerfishPosted 9/28/2009 7:09:48 PM
If you have a lot of money sitting around, see if Kaplan does a review course a month or so before the exam.
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#7Cauchys InequalityPosted 9/28/2009 11:12:16 PM
Neither. Barron's and Princeton Review are horrible. If College Board has one, go with that, and if not, a Kaplan book would be good. Or, of course, a Calc textbook.

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#8zaqwsx99221Posted 9/29/2009 1:25:36 PM
If you have a lot of money sitting around, see if Kaplan does a review course a month or so before the exam.

That would be an UTTER waste of time.


I got the Princeton Review book, and while I'm sure it's fine, I have NEVER OPENED IT.


You WILL NOT need it. So if you're just planning ahead for right before AP tests, don't bother. You won't use it at all.
#9XKillerPenguinXPosted 9/29/2009 5:08:34 PM
I got Princeton. Every Barron's book I've seen has been dense and superfluous. Princeton seems to be great so far.

From: us38 | #002
Neither. So long as you still have access to a traditional calculus book, that's your best bet for reviewing.


Then that would make calculus special. For every other AP class I've taken, study guides were far superior for test preparation. They teach directly to the test, whereas textbooks go over a broad range of information that you won't necessarily need for it. Of course a textbook is always going to be better for general knowledge, but the TC most likely wants something that's best suited for the test.
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#10VirtuousWrathPosted 9/30/2009 12:03:44 AM
Here's the thing. If you only focus on passing the AP test then you'll probably wind up doing less than stellar in more advanced calculus. I knew a couple of guys who got 5's on their exams. I got a 4. All three of us were taking the same vector calculus classes and guess what happened with them? One barely passed and the other had to retake the second half of the course where integration was taught. I however had no trouble passing and did so with B's. I'm not saying that I'm all that smart at math but the AP test is not that important so that's why I would go with the one fellow's suggestion of using the actual calculus book as a study guide. It will be your best bet because its not engineered for you to pass a test, it's designed to actually teach you something which is why you're in school.
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