Super Metroid Redesign???

#1oldgamer49Posted 7/15/2012 11:38:23 AM
I am a long time collector of SNES games. Today I came across a cartridge that looked to be legit that was titled "Super Metroid Redesign".

I have now read about the hack titled that, but how could it be on a original cartridge?

I am just stumped in regards to what I actually was looking at. Is it just a fake with a well made label?

It was $100 dollars at a very over priced store to begin with.
#2RoxinosPosted 7/15/2012 1:20:19 PM
It's just fake with a well-made label.
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#3MelodiaPosted 7/15/2012 11:00:23 PM
On another forum someone linked to a site selling custom made carts such as this (which of course I will not link to), and looking now, SM Redesign is indeed one of the offered titles.
Over priced would be putting it nicely -- it's $95 directly from them.

It's not /fake/ per se, as it IS a SNES cart that plays like a SNES game. It's also completely unofficial and probably illegal, however.
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#4oldgamer49(Topic Creator)Posted 7/16/2012 4:41:25 PM
This is interesting.

If that really is Redesign software inside that cartridge, it would be hard to pass up. That is not something you see everyday....for a good reason I am sure.

Anyone else ever see this?
#5MelodiaPosted 7/16/2012 11:09:56 PM
Having it be Redesign is not anything special, per se. Someone just is taking roms -- of various sorts, not just hacks like this but translations and even Famicom Disc games like SMB2 and making them into playable cartridges..
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Always Remember, Green Hair Is Cool.
#6CID1Posted 7/17/2012 1:31:05 AM
I've made myself repro carts. A buck ninety nine Madden 96 cart, an eprom and some solder and you got yourself something the store shelves of days now long past never had. (Not as simple as just that, but yeah). I wouldn't pay $100 though. Redesign happens to be the repro I'm currently playing right now.

The price is flat rate subject to the work and parts involved and why they cost so much. I'd never pay over 60USD for any SNES repro unless it's Star Fox 2 as that one is a serious pain to build and well worth $100 (it took me nearly all day when I made mine). Lost Classics is the only one I'd bother with these days. They stick to pretty strict guidelines, cancelled, hacks, homebrews and non region release stuff only and their labels I find to have a finish on them that looks far more legit that others I've seen.

If you're into that sort of thing of course. There are a lot of gamers that frown on repros. I'm a huge fan of Front Mission: Gunhazard (and the other Leynos like games) and while one can easily get a CIB copy for $12 at just about any retro expo, it was far worth the 5 times mark up to get my hands on a translated repro to plug into my SNES, but that's me.
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#7LvthnPosted 7/17/2012 11:53:34 AM
Unless I'm mistaken, Super Metroid doesn't use any special chips and hence the repro cart shouldn't be expensive at all. All you need for a non-special chip cart is any cart with sufficient memory space for the ROM you plan to put on it.

Getting a repro cart for something like Tales of Phantasia or a Mega Man X 2/3 game or something will obviously cost more since the hardware requirements are much more difficult. In those cases I think a flash cart is better if you want to play it on real hardware, unless you just insist on having a nice label and all that.
#8CID1Posted 7/17/2012 11:49:47 PM
No, most repro require the same eprom chip to be soldered on, an eprom writer, a new battery in most cases, some extra wires and time. The price is set about right at 60 USD for SNES as is $25 to $30 for NES depending on if you have to replace the character chip or not. Genesis, those are by far the easiest. They use standard eproms and silky smooth solder. The chip just drops right in, not extra wiring needed. I don't know why any one would charge more than $15 to $20 for one of those, but they do.

I had to make dozens of carts for donation homebrews at one of the retro expos last year. SNES carts eat up a lot of time to make and sometimes have a near 50% fail rate after the soldering is done. They fry easily.
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Proud owner of an original Haunted Castle (Castlevania) arcade cab. 2/11/11
CV collection nearing completion. Next up, Vs. Castlevania.
#9vZakatPosted 7/24/2012 8:32:25 AM
Isn't it illegal to sell hacks though? I thought it was illegal to even make hacks. I remember a Chrono trigger hack getting shut down by square. Not to mention that it's unfair for the people that made the hack cause I highly doubt they are getting money for any of the work they did. Whatever...
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#10LvthnPosted 7/25/2012 3:13:11 AM
vZakat posted...
Isn't it illegal to sell hacks though? I thought it was illegal to even make hacks. I remember a Chrono trigger hack getting shut down by square. Not to mention that it's unfair for the people that made the hack cause I highly doubt they are getting money for any of the work they did. Whatever...


Technically, no, no, and it's irrelevant.

Virtually all hacks are distributed as patch files and thus contain no copyright data. So nothing remotely illegal about distributing them or even charging for them. Now, it would be technically illegal to sell a reproduction that incorporates original game data, which virtually all of them do unless it's a homebrew made from whole cloth, but the hack itself...nope.

Same deal, not illegal to modify game data in and of itself if you own the game. Regardless of what most people do, there's technically nothing illegal about hacking a game. Square honestly didn't have a leg to stand on but if you're a homebrew guy are you going to take on a corporate legal department? Nope. PC gamers hack games constantly and distribute those mods openly and the idea of a C&D would make everyone laugh their asses off, but console developers are under the impression that they're above this unfortunately.

As for unfair to the hacker...eh, why, really? Every hack I've ever seen was freely available as a patch, most people who buy repro carts are paying for the game to be put on the original hardware, not the hack itself. I have personally done a couple hacks, if someone wants to sell it on a repro cart then I'd be honored that my hack is considered good enough to be worth paying to put on a cart, and they owe me nothing, my hacks are freeware and the charge is for putting the game on a cart which I did not do. At most I'd appreciate it if anyone selling my hacks preloaded (as opposed to on request) would credit me as the author.