DMC3 had a good story!

#41thissongagainPosted 11/28/2012 12:48:22 AM
Pesmerga255 posted...
DMC 2's story was dumb too.

I disagree. It was just so awe inspiringly incredible that our mortal minds couldn't comprehend its grandeur.


I am a DEVIL HUNTER!!!!!
#42thissongagainPosted 11/28/2012 12:50:01 AM
KA_ME_HA_ME_HA posted...
mmSNAKE posted...
It's amazing people still rattle about this. For those that believe any DMC game have good stories, they are either kidding themselves or they have extremely low standards in what a good story should be.

The story in the games was passable. It wasn't atrocious, it was decent enough to get few jokes in and some over the top action to glue in between the gameplay segments. The overall character development and plot complexity is almost non existent or just forced.

Hardly any games have "good" stories. There are only about a handful of games that have good plots and character progression, and even then there are faults. Even games which people do buy for story and character progression are just a fix on something they like it doesn't make it outstanding, just enjoyable.


I don't know.... Heavy Rain was pretty outstanding. Now THAT was some Hollywood quality stuff. I keep that game with my movies instead of the other games.


Except one of the characters being the killer made no sense, and no matter how many times you replay through his sections to justify his actions it just never made sense. I finally just decided he had to a multiple personality disorder just, so I could move on from hating that game ughhh.
#43AFreebyPosted 11/28/2012 12:55:27 AM
DMC, to me at least, always had decent stories (excluding 2) that were made all the better by the characterizations in them. The stories are all pretty basic, but the characters take those basic threads and make the story into something more enjoyable.

If you really want to see great story telling in a game series, go play the Legacy of Kain series. From the first game, Blood Omen, to the last, Defiance, that series had story telling, characters, and voice acting that rivaled many movies, television shows, and even some great books (minus the voice acting, obviously). Probably why it is still my favorite game series.
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Before me things create were none, save things eternal, and eternal I endure.
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#44SiLVeR_420Posted 11/28/2012 1:24:05 AM
thissongagain posted...
KA_ME_HA_ME_HA posted...
mmSNAKE posted...
It's amazing people still rattle about this. For those that believe any DMC game have good stories, they are either kidding themselves or they have extremely low standards in what a good story should be.

The story in the games was passable. It wasn't atrocious, it was decent enough to get few jokes in and some over the top action to glue in between the gameplay segments. The overall character development and plot complexity is almost non existent or just forced.

Hardly any games have "good" stories. There are only about a handful of games that have good plots and character progression, and even then there are faults. Even games which people do buy for story and character progression are just a fix on something they like it doesn't make it outstanding, just enjoyable.


I don't know.... Heavy Rain was pretty outstanding. Now THAT was some Hollywood quality stuff. I keep that game with my movies instead of the other games.


Except one of the characters being the killer made no sense, and no matter how many times you replay through his sections to justify his actions it just never made sense. I finally just decided he had to a multiple personality disorder just, so I could move on from hating that game ughhh.


You can watch the ending of Two Best Friends playtgrough of Heavy Rain to see how bad the games storytelling is.
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#45DJ_Slayer07Posted 11/28/2012 3:06:20 AM
DMC3 was actually really well written, in the sense that, at it's core, beneath all the silliness and "whoo hoo-ing", it's really a very traditional Campbellian hero's journey, hitting every major archetype and even going so far as to directly reference/lampshade a couple of them.

It starts with the call to adventure by a herald (referenced with Dante getting, and immediately refusing, a phone call in the first seconds of the game), which leads to Dante crossing a threshold into a new, unfamiliar world. It has the "belly of the whale" moment when Dante's beaten by Vergil and is revived with newfound power and resolve (and is hilariously referenced moments later when Dante's literally swallowed by a giant whale), it has a very Shakespearean climax in the middle with Arkham's revelation that serves as the turning point in the story, the apotheosis, when Dante realizes what's important to him, the ultimate boon when he confronts Arkham, the magic flight when he has to overcome Vergil and escape the demon world before the portal closes, and the return threshold, when he goes back and opens up his shop, and everything returns to normal, but with Dante having grown and learned over the course of his journey.

Every character also fits closely to a classic Jungian archetype. Arkham plays the role of the herald in the beginning, but later becomes the shapeshifter that Dante's forced to trust despite his obvious ill will. Lady serves as something of the muse, being the driving force in Dante's character development, but also goes through her own journey of growth and self-discovery that ends with her confronting her father, and Vergil, of course, is the shadow (another archetype that's directly referenced, this time in the Doppleganger boss fight), who represents Dante's dark half, the path he could have walked, the part of himself that he despises, but has to overcome and ultimately accept in order to complete his growth.

It's clear that the writers of DMC3 knew what they were doing and put a lot of thought into it. I wouldn't say it's anything outstanding (it definitely has some problems with pacing and exposition, especially in the second half), but it hits all the major notes that a good story should hit. You combine that with solid performance from the actors, good cinematography, a moving and consistent central theme about family, some subtle, some not-so subtle references to the Divine Comedy, and a great score, and I'd say it's perfectly fair to say that DMC3 has a "good" story.
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#46KyryloPosted 11/28/2012 3:41:14 AM
DJ_Slayer07 posted...
DMC3 was actually really well written, in the sense that, at it's core, beneath all the silliness and "whoo hoo-ing", it's really a very traditional Campbellian hero's journey, hitting every major archetype and even going so far as to directly reference/lampshade a couple of them.

It starts with the call to adventure by a herald (referenced with Dante getting, and immediately refusing, a phone call in the first seconds of the game), which leads to Dante crossing a threshold into a new, unfamiliar world. It has the "belly of the whale" moment when Dante's beaten by Vergil and is revived with newfound power and resolve (and is hilariously referenced moments later when Dante's literally swallowed by a giant whale), it has a very Shakespearean climax in the middle with Arkham's revelation that serves as the turning point in the story, the apotheosis, when Dante realizes what's important to him, the ultimate boon when he confronts Arkham, the magic flight when he has to overcome Vergil and escape the demon world before the portal closes, and the return threshold, when he goes back and opens up his shop, and everything returns to normal, but with Dante having grown and learned over the course of his journey.

Every character also fits closely to a classic Jungian archetype. Arkham plays the role of the herald in the beginning, but later becomes the shapeshifter that Dante's forced to trust despite his obvious ill will. Lady serves as something of the muse, being the driving force in Dante's character development, but also goes through her own journey of growth and self-discovery that ends with her confronting her father, and Vergil, of course, is the shadow (another archetype that's directly referenced, this time in the Doppleganger boss fight), who represents Dante's dark half, the path he could have walked, the part of himself that he despises, but has to overcome and ultimately accept in order to complete his growth.

It's clear that the writers of DMC3 knew what they were doing and put a lot of thought into it. I wouldn't say it's anything outstanding (it definitely has some problems with pacing and exposition, especially in the second half), but it hits all the major notes that a good story should hit. You combine that with solid performance from the actors, good cinematography, a moving and consistent central theme about family, some subtle, some not-so subtle references to the Divine Comedy, and a great score, and I'd say it's perfectly fair to say that DMC3 has a "good" story.


great explanation. 10/10. Those are words, I've been looking for all this time.
#47FireMage7777Posted 11/28/2012 3:43:07 AM
DJ_Slayer07 has won the topic
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How do you say "I need more power" in dinosaur? RAAAAAWR!!!
#48roxas9001Posted 11/28/2012 5:15:23 AM
DJ_Slayer07 posted...
DMC3 was actually really well written, in the sense that, at it's core, beneath all the silliness and "whoo hoo-ing", it's really a very traditional Campbellian hero's journey, hitting every major archetype and even going so far as to directly reference/lampshade a couple of them.

It starts with the call to adventure by a herald (referenced with Dante getting, and immediately refusing, a phone call in the first seconds of the game), which leads to Dante crossing a threshold into a new, unfamiliar world. It has the "belly of the whale" moment when Dante's beaten by Vergil and is revived with newfound power and resolve (and is hilariously referenced moments later when Dante's literally swallowed by a giant whale), it has a very Shakespearean climax in the middle with Arkham's revelation that serves as the turning point in the story, the apotheosis, when Dante realizes what's important to him, the ultimate boon when he confronts Arkham, the magic flight when he has to overcome Vergil and escape the demon world before the portal closes, and the return threshold, when he goes back and opens up his shop, and everything returns to normal, but with Dante having grown and learned over the course of his journey.

Every character also fits closely to a classic Jungian archetype. Arkham plays the role of the herald in the beginning, but later becomes the shapeshifter that Dante's forced to trust despite his obvious ill will. Lady serves as something of the muse, being the driving force in Dante's character development, but also goes through her own journey of growth and self-discovery that ends with her confronting her father, and Vergil, of course, is the shadow (another archetype that's directly referenced, this time in the Doppleganger boss fight), who represents Dante's dark half, the path he could have walked, the part of himself that he despises, but has to overcome and ultimately accept in order to complete his growth.

It's clear that the writers of DMC3 knew what they were doing and put a lot of thought into it. I wouldn't say it's anything outstanding (it definitely has some problems with pacing and exposition, especially in the second half), but it hits all the major notes that a good story should hit. You combine that with solid performance from the actors, good cinematography, a moving and consistent central theme about family, some subtle, some not-so subtle references to the Divine Comedy, and a great score, and I'd say it's perfectly fair to say that DMC3 has a "good" story.


And what were they thinking when they wrote 4? did all these ok talent just up & leave.
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Not changing this until DmCrap flops.
I dislike 90% of the FF fanbase.
#49FireMage7777Posted 11/28/2012 5:17:39 AM
roxas9001 posted...
DJ_Slayer07 posted...
DMC3 was actually really well written, in the sense that, at it's core, beneath all the silliness and "whoo hoo-ing", it's really a very traditional Campbellian hero's journey, hitting every major archetype and even going so far as to directly reference/lampshade a couple of them.

It starts with the call to adventure by a herald (referenced with Dante getting, and immediately refusing, a phone call in the first seconds of the game), which leads to Dante crossing a threshold into a new, unfamiliar world. It has the "belly of the whale" moment when Dante's beaten by Vergil and is revived with newfound power and resolve (and is hilariously referenced moments later when Dante's literally swallowed by a giant whale), it has a very Shakespearean climax in the middle with Arkham's revelation that serves as the turning point in the story, the apotheosis, when Dante realizes what's important to him, the ultimate boon when he confronts Arkham, the magic flight when he has to overcome Vergil and escape the demon world before the portal closes, and the return threshold, when he goes back and opens up his shop, and everything returns to normal, but with Dante having grown and learned over the course of his journey.

Every character also fits closely to a classic Jungian archetype. Arkham plays the role of the herald in the beginning, but later becomes the shapeshifter that Dante's forced to trust despite his obvious ill will. Lady serves as something of the muse, being the driving force in Dante's character development, but also goes through her own journey of growth and self-discovery that ends with her confronting her father, and Vergil, of course, is the shadow (another archetype that's directly referenced, this time in the Doppleganger boss fight), who represents Dante's dark half, the path he could have walked, the part of himself that he despises, but has to overcome and ultimately accept in order to complete his growth.

It's clear that the writers of DMC3 knew what they were doing and put a lot of thought into it. I wouldn't say it's anything outstanding (it definitely has some problems with pacing and exposition, especially in the second half), but it hits all the major notes that a good story should hit. You combine that with solid performance from the actors, good cinematography, a moving and consistent central theme about family, some subtle, some not-so subtle references to the Divine Comedy, and a great score, and I'd say it's perfectly fair to say that DMC3 has a "good" story.


And what were they thinking when they wrote 4? did all these ok talent just up & leave.


LOL@implyingsomethingwaswrongwith4
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How do you say "I need more power" in dinosaur? RAAAAAWR!!!
#50roxas9001Posted 11/28/2012 5:51:12 AM
FireMage7777 posted...
roxas9001 posted...
DJ_Slayer07 posted...
DMC3 was actually really well written, in the sense that, at it's core, beneath all the silliness and "whoo hoo-ing", it's really a very traditional Campbellian hero's journey, hitting every major archetype and even going so far as to directly reference/lampshade a couple of them.

It starts with the call to adventure by a herald (referenced with Dante getting, and immediately refusing, a phone call in the first seconds of the game), which leads to Dante crossing a threshold into a new, unfamiliar world. It has the "belly of the whale" moment when Dante's beaten by Vergil and is revived with newfound power and resolve (and is hilariously referenced moments later when Dante's literally swallowed by a giant whale), it has a very Shakespearean climax in the middle with Arkham's revelation that serves as the turning point in the story, the apotheosis, when Dante realizes what's important to him, the ultimate boon when he confronts Arkham, the magic flight when he has to overcome Vergil and escape the demon world before the portal closes, and the return threshold, when he goes back and opens up his shop, and everything returns to normal, but with Dante having grown and learned over the course of his journey.

Every character also fits closely to a classic Jungian archetype. Arkham plays the role of the herald in the beginning, but later becomes the shapeshifter that Dante's forced to trust despite his obvious ill will. Lady serves as something of the muse, being the driving force in Dante's character development, but also goes through her own journey of growth and self-discovery that ends with her confronting her father, and Vergil, of course, is the shadow (another archetype that's directly referenced, this time in the Doppleganger boss fight), who represents Dante's dark half, the path he could have walked, the part of himself that he despises, but has to overcome and ultimately accept in order to complete his growth.

It's clear that the writers of DMC3 knew what they were doing and put a lot of thought into it. I wouldn't say it's anything outstanding (it definitely has some problems with pacing and exposition, especially in the second half), but it hits all the major notes that a good story should hit. You combine that with solid performance from the actors, good cinematography, a moving and consistent central theme about family, some subtle, some not-so subtle references to the Divine Comedy, and a great score, and I'd say it's perfectly fair to say that DMC3 has a "good" story.


And what were they thinking when they wrote 4? did all these ok talent just up & leave.


LOL@implyingsomethingwaswrongwith4


Punk ass Nero, personalityless Kyrie, Dante acting like he was in 3 instead of 1, love story, KYYYYRIIIIEEEE!!!!, Nero's VA, yea that's alot.
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Not changing this until DmCrap flops.
I dislike 90% of the FF fanbase.