I went back to Oblivion to start a new character.....

#1jag_fanwsuPosted 2/11/2013 6:19:37 PM
Sure the graphics and RPG elements (and terrible leveling) have not aged well, but this game has such amazing presentation that it is a treat to revisit. The bright color palette is actually a nice change, and the lush forests are actually still sort of impressive. I am a mage this time, and am loving the mages guild quests. There are so many more spells to use in Oblivion than in Skyrim, and it just seems like it is so much deeper in terms of items and game mechanics. The combat is pretty so-so compared to Skyrim, but i have to say that i was delighted to see that Oblivion is still as appealing to me after 6 years and Skyrim have come along. Have any of you went back to oblivion? If so, was it tolerable? Or do you never have the intention of going back?
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Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.
#2Gobey6Posted 2/11/2013 6:22:48 PM
I miss oblivion but even after playing fallout 3 I couldn't go back to it... Maybe I've matured a bit since then and could appreciate it considering I just replayed the hitman HD trilogy... But I think those are just such drastically different games that I still enjoyed them...

Bethesda spoils me too much with each new entry
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"You're never too young to have a Vietnam flashback." --- Gamertag: Gobey6
#3Omega_GilgameshPosted 2/11/2013 6:28:32 PM
I had both Oblivion GOTY and Fallout 3 GOTY installed on my computer for years, most of that time either a virus kept me from playing them, or, after the virus was taken care of, the registry was so screwed up I could neither boot them up nor uninstall them.

Just got my computer back from having everything completely uninstalled, beginning again from a blank slate. Gonna reinstall those games soon, see if I can get back into them.
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The World's Most Interesting Man: I don't always herp, but when I do, I derp.
#4jag_fanwsu(Topic Creator)Posted 2/11/2013 6:30:19 PM
Yeah another thing i notice about Oblivion is that towns are way less populated, which was obviously a technological design choice. But seriously, it seems that Skyrim is rather simple in comparison. For example, there are spells for literally everything in Oblivion. I never played as a mage my first and only time through, but now i see why some of the hardcore TES fans complain about how Bethesda has "dumbed down" the series. I am not necessarily one of those people because I think Skyrim is great, but i've gotten a little perspective now. It's interesting to wonder if they sacraficed the depth for things like graphical presentation and gameplay. One example of this aside from the decrease in spells is that the cities in Oblivion are WAY more extensive than those in Skyrim (maybe with the exception of Solitude, Whiterun and Markarth).
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Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.
#5Gobey6Posted 2/11/2013 6:40:39 PM
jag_fanwsu posted...
One example of this aside from the decrease in spells is that the cities in Oblivion are WAY more extensive than those in Skyrim (maybe with the exception of Solitude, Whiterun and Markarth).


This I miss from oblivion.... Skyrim cities feel so small and boring
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"You're never too young to have a Vietnam flashback." --- Gamertag: Gobey6
#6am0ngth3c1oudsPosted 2/11/2013 7:05:56 PM
To be fair about "Spell Creation", I quote M'aiq the Liar.
"What does this mean, to combine magic? Magic plus magic is still magic."

Why make a spell that can heal while doing damage while you can just put each one of those in a different hand?

All the spell effects in Oblivion looked exactly the same. Only difference was varying degrees of magnitude. A lot of effects, due to how they're cast would be impossible to combine in Skyrim anyway. Think about it for five minutes and you'll see what I mean.

"Well what if I want to Calm and Frenzy someone at the same time?"
"What if I want to Muffle and Stoneflesh at the same time?"
"What if I want to do Fire and Frost damage at the same time?"

see what I'm getting at?
#7jag_fanwsu(Topic Creator)Posted 2/11/2013 7:16:29 PM
Yeah but what about the fact that you can summon so many different types of characters in oblivion? Or the fact that you can cast "weakness to" spells instead of drinking a potion etc? I get what you're pointing out, and agree with you somewhat....but this list puts Skyrim to shame.

http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Oblivion:Spells


On another note....the music is a bust. I cant make a decision as to what game has a better ambient soundtrack.
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Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.
#8Omega_GilgameshPosted 2/11/2013 7:28:05 PM
am0ngth3c1ouds posted...
All the spell effects in Oblivion looked exactly the same. Only difference was varying degrees of magnitude.


This. Other than lightning and drain effects, the only difference between any of the spells is color, like the endings to Mass Effect 3 (HIYOO, I WENT THERE!)

And if you think Oblivion had a lot more spells than Skyrim, look at the spell list for Morrowind. I counted it once, there was something like 135 different spells, and that was BEFORE combining them. Someone once did the math, and found that, with the spell combination mechanic, there was in the range of 165 BILLION possible spells you could make in that game, no joke. That's billion, with a B.

And Daggerfall had a lot of spells you don't see in later games, such as one that lets you walk through walls, and another that answers riddles for you.
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The World's Most Interesting Man: I don't always herp, but when I do, I derp.
#9am0ngth3c1oudsPosted 2/11/2013 7:35:23 PM
jag_fanwsu posted...
Yeah but what about the fact that you can summon so many different types of characters in oblivion? Or the fact that you can cast "weakness to" spells instead of drinking a potion etc? I get what you're pointing out, and agree with you somewhat....but this list puts Skyrim to shame.

http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Oblivion:Spells


On another note....the music is a bust. I cant make a decision as to what game has a better ambient soundtrack.


I do miss the weakness spells. Dawnguard and Dragonborn both added some new summons, to be fair (three Undead and three Daedric). Plus, in Skyrim you can summon two different Dragons, the ghost of a recently deceased College member, three different Nordic heroes and zombies have been done away with since you can Raise Dead etc NPCs.

Oblivion had more Daedra, which is a plus there.. but all the Undead summons were just upgrades (more powerful skeletons, zombies, etc) of the same model.


Personally I enjoy Skyrim's music better. The main theme, for example, is awesome. Oblivion's sounds like Pirates of the Caribbean
#10am0ngth3c1oudsPosted 2/11/2013 7:37:20 PM
Omega_Gilgamesh posted...
am0ngth3c1ouds posted...
All the spell effects in Oblivion looked exactly the same. Only difference was varying degrees of magnitude.


This. Other than lightning and drain effects, the only difference between any of the spells is color, like the endings to Mass Effect 3 (HIYOO, I WENT THERE!)

And if you think Oblivion had a lot more spells than Skyrim, look at the spell list for Morrowind. I counted it once, there was something like 135 different spells, and that was BEFORE combining them. Someone once did the math, and found that, with the spell combination mechanic, there was in the range of 165 BILLION possible spells you could make in that game, no joke. That's billion, with a B.

And Daggerfall had a lot of spells you don't see in later games, such as one that lets you walk through walls, and another that answers riddles for you.


I particularly miss Levitate. How hard would have been to put a cap on the height or an invisible wall within a certain distance around the closed cell cities? It's been speculated they didn't include it so you couldn't short cut dungeons alternate exits, but most of those doors need a key or are locked from the other side anyway.