Anybody else prefer Oblivion lock picking

#31WebstedgePosted 3/21/2013 3:47:52 PM
So am I the only dude who likes Skyrim's lockpicking the best? I don't actually know anything about lockpicking but the mechanics of it make me feel like I might be doing something that someone actually does when they pick a lock. I like that, and I like how you have to do try-and-error to find the sweet spot. It all seems more real and immersive to me.
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#32Joe_CobbsPosted 3/21/2013 3:49:00 PM
Bashing a lock open should just be loud and attract attention to you. That way stealth characters still have a reason for lockpicks. And mages get their open spell back which also isn't very stealthy without something like silent casting.
#33Carruth81Posted 3/21/2013 3:52:34 PM
Webstedge posted...
So am I the only dude who likes Skyrim's lockpicking the best? I don't actually know anything about lockpicking but the mechanics of it make me feel like I might be doing something that someone actually does when they pick a lock. I like that, and I like how you have to do try-and-error to find the sweet spot. It all seems more real and immersive to me.


No I was happy to see them switch to this method as well. The only skill OB's lock picking required was hand-eye coordination or else the tumbler would slam down and break your pick.
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#34runner5676Posted 3/21/2013 5:29:31 PM(edited)
lunarsword posted...
Obviously, since it required skill rather than total guesswork. Besides, I don't see a medieval fantasy world having modern style locking mechanisms like Fallout/Skyrim


How does Fallout/Skyrim have the modern locking mechanisms when they only have one pin to pick? If anything Oblivions system is more modern than either since it had what, 5 pins?

Medieval locks were more primitive, since they didn't have fancy stuff like magnetic pins or other modern methods to try and make locks unpickable, but they surely had more than a single pin! You can tell that just by looking at a medieval key.

As someone who does lockpicking as a hobby, I'd really prefer a realistic system where the entire thing is done by feel (this is fairly easy to do on a gaming pad, but not so great for those playing on mouse and keyboard) and would like to have a torque wrench as well as a pick instead of just a single pick.

Obviously this would have to exist as a settable option since it would be frustrating as heck for people who don't wanna get all hardcore about getting inside a treasure chest that contains a pair of iron gloves and a mouldy apple.
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#35HoonDingPosted 3/21/2013 5:39:14 PM
Lockpicking, bashing, and Open spells all need to exist. Hell, I don't even think Lockpicking should be a full-fledged skill, as much as it should be a player-skill based minigame. Lockpicking should happen in real time.

Bashing and Open need some cons to offset their usefulness over Lockpicking, though. Bashing makes a f***ton of noise, that's easy enough; who ever heard of a master cat burglar brute forcing his way into a mansion with a mace? Daggers shouldn't be able to bash, either; not even sure if swords should.

Open's a bit tricky. Why bother investing in a Lockpicking skill at all, when you can instead master a skill that offers a ton of other useful toys for thieves? Maybe make it a streaming spell, like Flames, that's really loud, bright, and takes more time to work depending on the quality of the lock. Maybe make it a spell exclusive to scrolls; this would be better if scroll-crafting was possible, so that it still reflected character skill.
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#36Perma-n00bPosted 3/21/2013 5:42:25 PM
I prefer skyrims system..... Simple and quick.