How would you feel about these features being in a TES game?

#1royicPosted 8/14/2013 9:22:19 AM
1. Weariness
A fourth stat bar. It's a long term thing and somewhat similar New Vegas's hardcore mode. When it's low, your skills (damage output, defense, speech, etc.) are less effective. When its in the middle your skills will perform nominally. When its high you get a bonus. It would naturally gravitate towards the middle. Swimming in cold water, fighting, sleeping on the ground, being in storms, rain, etc. would drain it below the middle. Eating food, sleeping in nice places, walking around opulent rooms, getting drunk, having followers, increases it past the middle. The point is to get away from those Skyrim characters who sleep two hours of their lives and never eat anything. There would be a point to expensive food, nice clothes, staying in an inn vs. sleeping in a gutter, waiting out a rain storm in a cave, taking a bridge over swimming through an arctic river.

2. More in depth faction dynamics
Factions would dislike certain other factions and your reputation would those other factions would suffer for gaining rank in opposing factions (No more of being an Orc who knows one spell being the archmage, captain of the fighters guild, and night-mother listener). At the same time, there would be competing ideals within each faction. For example, there could be two subfactions within the College of Winterhold. Depending on which quest giver/ideals you go along with, you would gain a different kind of reputation with that faction and other factions. Maybe the ideals of one subfaction would overlap with those or of the opposing faction, or conflict harshly to them. As you gain more power within your faction, you could actually steer its policies into making peace with the opposing faction or escalating to all out war. It would actually make there be a point to gaining more power in your faction.

3. Mount and blade-ish faction interactions.
call it radiant factions or something. Each faction has a source of income, ebony mines or villages or something; it's territory that they control for influence. Competing factions send out raiding parties, thieves, extorters, assassins, hired thugs etc. (depending on their trade) to try to ruin or capture income sources and territory from other factions. They might raid goods being delivered. It would all play into the game's economy. To make this important to the player, you would gain properties, followers, income etc the higher your rank in a faction. There would also be infrastructure you could invest into to in your territories, which would be expensive and give the player a place to actually spend all the money they make.

4. Instead of having fast travel, there's an overhauled carriage system.
There are multiple carriage companies, each controlling certain portions of the road. You can walk onto the roads in the province and wait for a carriage to come (if you rest, the game will wake you up when one comes along). The carriages can take you anywhere along the road. I think it's a good compromise between Oblivion's being able to travel anywhere instantly and Morrowind's taking forever to get anywhere unless a silt strider/boat will take you there; if you get to a road you can go anywhere on the road quickly.

radiant factions also plays into this. The different carriage companies compete with each other. If their carriages keep getting raided, they will hire more guards depending on how bad the raid was. If they keep suffering losses, they will be forced to sell territory to competitors.
---
GT-Ducksaws
Mount and Blade is fun.
#2JMLSPPosted 8/14/2013 9:28:16 AM
Sounds cool, specially number 2...
#3RikiazPosted 8/14/2013 9:37:07 AM
royic posted...
4. In addition to having fast travel, there's an overhauled carriage system.


Just don't use it. Or do you really have that little self-control that you have to get rid of fast travel to stop yourself from using it?
---
In death lays ecstasy, in undeath lays immortality
#4royic(Topic Creator)Posted 8/14/2013 9:45:01 AM
Rikiaz posted...
royic posted...
4. In addition to having fast travel, there's an overhauled carriage system.


Just don't use it. Or do you really have that little self-control that you have to get rid of fast travel to stop yourself from using it?


Well, there is the wider issue that if a feature is included that is as huge as that, the game tends to be organized around it.

It could just be a hardcore option to turn off fast travel to any location. I'm not sure how many people are super attached to being able to fast travel everywhere.
---
GT-Ducksaws
Mount and Blade is fun.
#5JMLSPPosted 8/14/2013 9:52:19 AM
royic posted...
Rikiaz posted...
royic posted...
4. In addition to having fast travel, there's an overhauled carriage system.


Just don't use it. Or do you really have that little self-control that you have to get rid of fast travel to stop yourself from using it?


Well, there is the wider issue that if a feature is included that is as huge as that, the game tends to be organized around it.

It could just be a hardcore option to turn off fast travel to any location. I'm not sure how many people are super attached to being able to fast travel everywhere.


Well, I can only play for a couple of hours a day, so I use fast travel a lot, but I still liked that carriage idea....
#6royic(Topic Creator)Posted 8/14/2013 10:01:17 AM

Well, I can only play for a couple of hours a day, so I use fast travel a lot, but I still liked that carriage idea....


The overall idea is that it still lets you move around the map easily but it doesn't gut the feeling that you just traveled across an entire country. Before you just fast traveled to the nearest location you'd already been to the objective. Now you just travel to the closest part of the road to it.

But it would cost money to travel there. You could take a lavish carriage or just rent a horse going along with a caravan (playing into that weariness bar), or volunteer for guard duty with a trading party going out if you can't afford the travel. Maybe a roaming group of bandits would ambush your caravan and you would have to fight them off, or run into the woods to escape.

I just want to make the feeling of traveling across an entire continent full of bandits and monsters feel more like an expedition than teleportation. Hopefully you wouldn't mind the traveling potentially taking longer than fast travel because interacting with the roadways would be entertaining in itself.
---
GT-Ducksaws
Mount and Blade is fun.
#7royic(Topic Creator)Posted 8/14/2013 12:48:54 PM
post
---
GT-Ducksaws
Mount and Blade is fun.
#8Spinder1Posted 8/14/2013 5:32:26 PM(edited)
1. I think I'd rather have a different kind of mechanics dealing with things like, oh, swimming for hours in the Sea of Ghosts wearing 100 pounds of steel. Introducing a bigger point to eating food, wearing certain clothes etc. is commendable, but I'm not sure if a meter is the best idea because in my opinion it was unengaging in New Vegas. It became trivial and a chore, not a game mechanic that felt immersive and significant. I'm in favor of the principle but I don't think I'd want another mechanic quite like that.

I think it's crucial that anything that attempts to deal with issues like this needs careful consideration to avoid having it become just another thing where you feel compelled to keep the meter at max, which is what I instinctively feel would happen with your proposed idea. It needs to be more a fluid and natural part of the gameplay and less of another set of magnitudes to try to max. I don't really have any ideas. It's hard to walk the line between tedious and engaging/immersive. Of course, if this was a strictly optional thing then by all means since a lot of people do seem to enjoy these aspects of HC mode.

2. This should IMO be a given rather than a question of whether it's good or not. The world needs to be much much much more responsive, and factions should be more dynamic and in-depth.

3. Sounds pretty cool, but things like this should always be tied to and decided by the overall story and setting. I wouldn't want it just for the sake of having it if it doesn't fit naturally.

4. I like the sound of that. But fast travel really can be nice sometimes. A lot of it has to do with the quest design. Running back and forth over long stretches for relatively trivial things should be avoided like the plague. But even in a game with considerably better quest design, New Vegas, it sometimes still got tedious and I was glad to be able to just warp back at those times. I think FT adds to the replay value. The very first time playing a game you might never even be compelled because everything is new and interesting. But after several hundred hours, the countryside probably won't grab your attention the same way anymore and you'd rather be getting to the meat of the quests. The trick is to avoid having the game become forcefully slow (very different from offering the player the opportunity to take their time). Even small things can really, really add up when so many hours are spent playing.

It's a personal thing, but I also don't find FT immersion-breaking at all. As I see it it's no different from carriages in principle as it just represents the PC walking there. I don't really think this is a necessary change because for players who want to walk absolutely all the time, they can already do that. The system then accommodates for all possible in-betweens, from those who warp every time and those like me who appreciate being able to do it if the urge strikes me for whatever reason. I view it as a "don't fix it" kind of thing. By all means add a feature like this, but keep FT.
---
Let him be king over charred bones and cooked meat. Let him be the king of ashes
#9NicodaemosPosted 8/14/2013 5:36:16 PM
1. Sure, as an optional feature.

2. Yes.

3. Sounds cool, but let's not try to juggle too many genres, yes?

4. Sure, but keep FT as an optional feature.
---
Until you spread your wings, you'll never know how far you can walk.
GT-- The Baconer
#10SuperFlikPosted 8/14/2013 6:24:37 PM
Carriage travel would work well if they had it like in Red Dead Redemption, where you can watch the scenery or "fall asleep" and wake up at your destination.
---
Zelos Wilder: "Demon Fang! Demon Fang! Demon Fang!
Damn, I must be a genius! Double Demon Fang!"