SONY dropping support. Vita's life expectancy? Difference with Vita & PSPGo?

#71TheLastBladePosted 7/11/2014 1:56:46 PM
I like how most people can still be oblivious on why PS Vita failed.

1. Sony chose to mess up the PSP's success.
2. Sony chose to mess everyone up with Memory cards.
3. Sony chose to make people pay money for PSP games people already own.
4. Sony chose not to fix any of the PS Vita's issues.
#72ProzacMessiahPosted 7/14/2014 3:08:18 PM
The high-powered handheld has always lost to whatever lower-powered system Nintendo was fielding at the time. Game Gear, Nomad, the Atari Lynx, the NeoGeo Whatever, the PSP--they all lost the sales wars to their Nintendo competitors. Now that segment is either shrinking further or becoming more comfortable on mobile phone platforms, depending on how you want to spin it. The Vita is a niche device in a declining market segment, and if it used Micro SD cards rather than Sony's proprietary cards, its sales wouldn't be that much better.

Unless they travel frequently or have to ask Mom to use the TV, most people prefer a home console or PC for serious gaming. My Vita gets much less use than any of my home consoles, yet at least 80% of my Vita playtime has been at home on my couch. I've been tethered for about the same amount, and the feature I've most desired is HDMI-out. I figure I'm pretty typical given Sony's two new Vita initiatives. Playstation TV and mandatory remote play functionality are clever solutions to the challenges facing the Vita, and dedicated handheld gaming systems in general.

Developers now have two new options* when developing their next title. They can develop once for the PS4, and users can play on their Vitas when the TV isn't available or when the spirit moves them. The other option is to develop once for the PS Vita, and users can either play it on their Playstation TV or go mobile on their Vita (those that have one). If your owner surveys are showing that 80% of your slow-selling handheld console's usage is at home, both of these new initiatives are cost-effective ways to leverage your existing products to build some synergy. To really prosper, the Vita has to become either a phone or a home console. The latter is cheaper and faster.

*The "old" option is the one they have now: develop separate home console and Vita ports (MLB), or entirely distinct editions for each platform (Uncharted).
#73CompassPosted 7/14/2014 3:21:04 PM
ProzacMessiah posted...
If your owner surveys are showing that 80% of your slow-selling handheld console's usage is at home, both of these new initiatives are cost-effective ways to leverage your existing products to build some synergy.

Well, sure, you can use your owner's surveys to justify any lazy money-grab scheme you're currently running as long as they're vague enough.

How many owner's surveys asked people why they bought a Vita and included these choices?:

*To stream PS4 games
*To play exclusive Vita games

At this point, you have a lot of buyer's remorse, reassurance, and Stockholm Syndrome going on, so you probably would get a certain amount of resigned votes for the first option. But when Vita first released, and the future looked semi-bright, it would have been a different story.
#74CooperRCPosted 7/14/2014 3:29:51 PM(edited)
TranslatorTom posted...
In Japan, the Vita's in second place, outselling both the PS4 and the Wii U in Japan this past week, behind the 3DS by 8,000 units.


The problem is that the Vita never put up bigger sales numbers for years like the 3DS. There is a massive gap in the total number of Vita's and 3DS's sold in Japan, and the low weekly sales of the Vita are not going to put a dent in that gap.
#75DJPLACEPosted 7/16/2014 9:08:28 AM
this topic is why i think the 2nd video game crash is comming.
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have no PS3 or Vita till i win lotto.
#76ProzacMessiahPosted 7/16/2014 2:36:45 PM
Compass posted...
But when Vita first released, and the future looked semi-bright, it would have been a different story.


Of course it would have been. You seem to be very angry with Sony, despite the fact that they wanted the same thing you do: a traditionally successful handheld, fueled by lots of exclusive $40 games. Unfortunately, there were not nearly enough takers in total, so the only question was whether and how Sony would be able to turn lemons into lemonade.
#77CompassPosted 7/16/2014 3:23:40 PM
Not so much mad as justifiably disappointed. Sony's incompetence and laziness, while not the only reasons for Vita's failure, were huge contributors. Should I be patting them on the back for trying to gouge their own fanbase mercilessly with slow-ass proprietary memory cards, or not even having their own internal studios support the system with original games past launch?

These lemons poor little Sony has to make lemonade from are home-grown and farm fresh.