So are Brits all butthurt over this game?

#151LaManoNeraIIPosted 11/5/2012 7:21:07 PM
Madelle posted...
LaManoNeraII posted...
They fought for something, against overwhelming superiority, for a concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years. That is pretty heroic..

Come again? Where did you learn your history? Because if you paid for the lessons, you should demand your money back. "A concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years"? Yes. No one had ever dreamed of a free republic between the days of Rome and the US constitution!

How about the Corsican republic established in 1755? They even gave women the vote! That seems like a fairly solid concept of liberty to me. Yet, apparently dreams of such liberty only emerged from the likes of Jefferson and Madison? Not Pasquale Paoli? Or the Republic of Venice, which implemented safeguards to ward against one man controlling the city's affairs? And it's certainly not like the founding fathers were spurred on by say... the Scottish enlightenment? Or some fellow by the name of Thomas Hobbes? They just came up with the idea all on their own!


That's a whole lot of words for not proving me wrong. A state had not existed on our planet like America since ancient Greece. That, of course, doesn't negate the efforts of others before then. I don't know why you're implying that is what I implied.
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#152iHoldWithFirePosted 11/5/2012 7:28:16 PM
bloodgod92 posted...
Madelle posted...
LaManoNeraII posted...
They fought for something, against overwhelming superiority, for a concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years. That is pretty heroic..

Come again? Where did you learn your history? Because if you paid for the lessons, you should demand your money back. "A concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years"? Yes. No one had ever dreamed of a free republic between the days of Rome and the US constitution!

How about the Corsican republic established in 1755? They even gave women the vote! That seems like a fairly solid concept of liberty to me. Yet, apparently dreams of such liberty only emerged from the likes of Jefferson and Madison? Not Pasquale Paoli? Or the Republic of Venice, which implemented safeguards to ward against one man controlling the city's affairs? And it's certainly not like the founding fathers were spurred on by say... the Scottish enlightenment? Or some fellow by the name of Thomas Hobbes? They just came up with the idea all on their own!


Just to add to that, Magna Carta also springs to mind, that was a king being FORCED into giving commoners and nobles more rights...

That made me lol, spoken like a true American, how sad we can be
#153Arctic_SunrisePosted 11/5/2012 7:30:14 PM
Sigh.

Well, at least somebody saw my post and thought it worthwhile.
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#154bloodgod92Posted 11/5/2012 7:33:33 PM
iHoldWithFire posted...
bloodgod92 posted...
Madelle posted...
LaManoNeraII posted...
They fought for something, against overwhelming superiority, for a concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years. That is pretty heroic..

Come again? Where did you learn your history? Because if you paid for the lessons, you should demand your money back. "A concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years"? Yes. No one had ever dreamed of a free republic between the days of Rome and the US constitution!

How about the Corsican republic established in 1755? They even gave women the vote! That seems like a fairly solid concept of liberty to me. Yet, apparently dreams of such liberty only emerged from the likes of Jefferson and Madison? Not Pasquale Paoli? Or the Republic of Venice, which implemented safeguards to ward against one man controlling the city's affairs? And it's certainly not like the founding fathers were spurred on by say... the Scottish enlightenment? Or some fellow by the name of Thomas Hobbes? They just came up with the idea all on their own!


Just to add to that, Magna Carta also springs to mind, that was a king being FORCED into giving commoners and nobles more rights...

That made me lol, spoken like a true American, how sad we can be


I am British :)
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#155PlanescapedPosted 11/5/2012 7:40:39 PM(edited)
I was born in Merika, live in Merika, and Merikans make me cringe.

lol wut?

IB4 go back to Africa.
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#156MadellePosted 11/5/2012 7:39:43 PM
LaManoNeraII posted...
That's a whole lot of words for not proving me wrong. A state had not existed on our planet like America since ancient Greece. That, of course, doesn't negate the efforts of others before then. I don't know why you're implying that is what I implied.

Except you're wrong. Did you read what I wrote at all? Was it too much text? The Corsican Republic was a sovereign nation. It was a democratic representative democracy. It was a republic! It even had broader suffrage than the United States, in that women were allowed to vote. Something that would take the Americans (and many other Western republican governments) about 150 years to implement.

The Corsican constitution was the very FIRST such document to be drafted under the enlightenment principles and inspired by Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Pasquale Paoli himself. So, if anything its concept of liberty was far more advanced,

Not to mention that in 1720, the Swedish crown ceded nearly all its powers to the parliament in what became known as the "Age of Liberty". Sweden, too, was (and remains) a sovereign state.

Obviously, neither the Corsican Republic nor the Swedish Age of Liberty endured, which America did. They still existed, however.
#157LaManoNeraIIPosted 11/5/2012 8:10:22 PM
Madelle posted...
LaManoNeraII posted...
That's a whole lot of words for not proving me wrong. A state had not existed on our planet like America since ancient Greece. That, of course, doesn't negate the efforts of others before then. I don't know why you're implying that is what I implied.


Obviously, neither the Corsican Republic nor the Swedish Age of Liberty endured, which America did. They still existed, however.


Hence my original quote, "They fought for something, against overwhelming superiority, for a concept of liberty that hadn't existed on our planet in 2,000 years."

Our founding fathers made it happen. True, they had help- but what did the French have to lose? What did any of the Italian states have to lose, for that matter? They were all ruled by monarchies, bought and sold like property. They weren't truly united until Garibaldi did it. Who then surrendered the power he accumulated for the greater good of his people. Sound familiar?

The American colonists had everything to lose in their fight against the Crown. This wasn't just a group of philosophizers. They fought for their very survival, for the creation of the biggest democracy since Greece, and fought for the future we Americans take for granted today. And this honestly surprises you that we consider them heroes?
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R.I.P LaManoNera
04-06-2009
#158firelover1991Posted 11/5/2012 8:16:31 PM
The topic title seems like it was only meant to get a rise out of people. Butthurt? Really? The game is LOOSELY based on history. The colonies won the war. I don't see why British people TODAY would be 'butthurt' over a war several generations past. I'm an American, and I've no problems with the British, nor do the British people I've met in my lifetime seem to have a problem with me. In fact, it is my hope one day to visit their country and learn a little bit about their culture.
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#159ArthasRebornPosted 11/5/2012 8:42:13 PM
Judging from that other topic, I feel like Americans are the ones that are hurt by the portrayal of events and people in this game.
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#160deadpool223Posted 11/5/2012 8:45:26 PM
ArthasReborn posted...
Judging from that other topic, I feel like Americans are the ones that are hurt by the portrayal of events and people in this game.


americans are hurt by everything.
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