Favorite thing about his game (SPOILERS)

#11-GIN_n_JUICE-Posted 1/6/2014 4:43:11 AM
Tenryuu_N7 posted...
My favorite part of the game is how refreshingly fun the wife and I have found the experience to be. The atmosphere and large monster fights are a lot of fun and we fight over who gets to play every night. The first time we ran into the Chimera in the woods and it destroyed me was the first time I actually enjoyed dying in a game. Figured at that point, this game wasn't going to hand hold my adventure. No idea how its going to end, but I'm loving it so far!

So glad the PS+ put this game out for play otherwise we would never have given it a try. If they ever make a sequel, its a definite preorder for us. Though the side effect of this fun game is that both our next gen machines are collecting dust.


I Know exactly what you mean!

I have put well into 100 hours into this game. My PS4 looks awfully lonely! I hope a next gen DD happens!
---
Chris Hansen of Malboro! Final Fantasy XIV
PSN: Live_Laugh_Lag_
#12malicemizerfan(Topic Creator)Posted 1/6/2014 1:44:55 PM
ragedemonz posted...
malicemizerfan posted...
That's another thing, there's virtually no hand-holding, beyond the pawns constant reminder that running away is definitely an option. Not "You can do this!" just "hey, running away is better than being dead, remember how far away from town you are and all that cool stuff you found?"


Definitely. I think using the pawn's quest/area familiarity was a great alternative to something else. With the pawns it keeps the "tutorial" within the game elements and I think that makes it immersive at least to me. I mean I just restarted two days ago and still am amazed when I'm on a quest to lead Quinna to Selene and as we're going through the witchwood one of the pawns I hired starts leading the way through saying "Follow me Arisen, it's this way". There's so much in that because it is someone else's pawn, someone's whose completed that quest and in a way it's well...it's real.


Mine just kept going with "dude, this place is creeping me out! We should leave... Please? WOLVES! SPIDERS! It's foggy! Hey, there's a shiny thing over there."

I may need to get my pawn some ADD meds. or limit their coffee intake.
---
WARBRO FOREVER!
#13ArchiantagonistPosted 1/6/2014 4:33:00 PM
Basically, I liked all the moments when the game succeeded in putting me at my place...

Examples:

- Starting the game, everything is easy and all
Me: This game is a joke!
...then I picked the quest to explore the bottom of the well at Cassardis....and died

- Everfall: countless hours since I last died [or even used any curatives]
Chamber of Fate = Gorechimera + Chimera + Lich
Me: Meh...nothing special
...couple of minutes later = dead [although I refused to use curatives in that fight, but w/e]

- BBI: Pilgrim's Gauntlet [post-Daimon]
*looking down from the balcony...seeing Firedrake + some Wraiths*
Me: Nah...shouldn't be THAT bad
...died more times than anywhere else [before and/or after] in the game
---
--------------------x_0--------------------
#14the_requiemPosted 1/7/2014 9:19:55 AM
The Community.
---
the_requiem | wreck_em | Nemo | 200 | Fighter - http://imgur.com/a/LabmW#7
the_requiem | wreck_gow | Arya | 51 | Ranger
#15chaoscontrol325Posted 1/8/2014 12:45:40 AM
The string of final boss fights is number two on my favorite end segments of all time after Okami for all the reasons you yourself listed. The story towards the end just blew me out of the water. What blew my mind even harder was the second time I finished it and my first character was the Seneschal.

But my absolute favorite part of this game was the sense of adventure. The first time I played through this game was an amazing ride. I quickly learned that the game would not hold my hand and would definitely spawn enemies way beyond my league, but never tell me exactly how strong they were. I really had to scope out a monster in the distance first and think to myself "it's pretty big. Wonder if I can take it...."

I remember staring down a path, intrigued by what I might find, but at the same time fearing what lied around the bend.

I remember fighting my first band of bandits outside Witchwood. Just simple bandits, I thought. But I quickly learned they were -just- like me and my merry band of pawns and we were outnumbered.

And I remember my first night, when I was down south. I thought "how bad could it possibly get?" It got dark fast and I realized that the lantern wasn't just helping me, it was outright required. I remember not seeing anything outside the range of my lantern and how every bush blowing in the wind was confused with a monster. I remember fighting a pack of wolves and how they would dart in and out of the ring of light in their successful attempts to confuse me and tell myself I was surrounded by tens of wolves. And I remember the growling sound right before a Chimera leaped into my ring of light and mauled me.

But most of all, I remember how I ran. This is the first RPG I have ever played where I felt compelled to run. I ran from the big monster I thought I could take, I ran from the pack of Saurians I met at the end of the path my curiosity had compelled me to explore, I ran from the bandits that ambushed me outside Witchwood and I ran from the Chimera and through the night just hoping, wishing, begging I'd make it to the encampment.

I ran as fast as I could and when I got back to safety, every time I would think "some day I'll be back and when I do, you'll wish you'd have killed me the first time." And I -always- came back.
---
PSN: Lazuri65 XBL:LazuriXIII
If you don't write you're from GameFAQs and what board in the friend request, you will be denied.
#16lordofthenlpplePosted 1/8/2014 3:14:49 AM
The Arisen could have taken the bribe, or even just forfeit the fight and live the life of an immortal on earth. Barroch turned slacker and decided to just have fun with life. But the arisen you control went the distance, constantly betting against the house. And when he won the house, he did the most altruistic thing he could. Which was to burn it down.
---
Liu Ye and Anais Martanehttp://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k218/p_c_ty/nancy06.jpg
#17lordofthenlpplePosted 1/8/2014 12:46:35 PM(edited)
Many of the Arisens are motivated by revenge. One Arisen lost his mother, the Arisen we control had few of his neighbors killed by the Dragon. I dont know who Barroch lost, but whoever it was, that person wasnt important enough for Barroch to slay the dragon.

The Arisen you control finally defeats the Dragon and Seneschal. When he discovers the whole process was a test of will and it was his turn to set a dragon loose on the world to search for another Arisen, who may or may not have the will to fight and survive. The arisen you control chose not to. Instead, he committed suicide to end the cycle.

The game starts out with the quote, "the delightful and ever novel pleasure of a useless occupation".

And you dont really know what that quote means until you finish the game. But I suspect that in the context of this game, it means being the Seneschal is a useless occupation.
---
Liu Ye and Anais Martanehttp://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k218/p_c_ty/nancy06.jpg
#18InfernoRodanPosted 1/8/2014 12:54:48 PM
^ The interesting thing about Barroch and Olra is they both know about the cycle. Barroch comments on "the wisdom of leaving it all alone" or something to that effect. And Olra outright says she knows you killed yourself after becoming Seneschal, and thanks you for doing so because that's what allowed her to meet you and you to conquer BBI (and thus free her).
---
InfernoRodan - Stella, lvl 200 Strider | InfernoRodan2 - Luna, lvl 200 Mage | InfernoRodan3 - Sol, lvl 200 Fighter
#19S0nYxdbPosted 1/9/2014 5:38:41 PM
Favorite thing about the game. hmmm, other than the awesome community, there was one other thing.


I know many people dismissed the story of this game but I honestly think it was one of the best parts of the game. Sure the middle parts suck, but the beginning and the end were spectacular. I loved the Seneschal/God/Circle of life thing going and how we as people are just there to exist and not to mention Fate/Destiny is how life works in the game. I loved the story so much I find myself reading into Philosophy and New age just for kicks.
---
PSN: ManongJose Dragon's Dogma DA pawn Sorcerer Nanoha lvl 200 PSN: MangJavs pawn Strider Mikasa lvl 160
#20ChickenChaserPosted 1/10/2014 12:38:05 PM
lordofthenlpple posted...
Many of the Arisens are motivated by revenge. One Arisen lost his mother, the Arisen we control had few of his neighbors killed by the Dragon. I dont know who Barroch lost, but whoever it was, that person wasnt important enough for Barroch to slay the dragon.

The Arisen you control finally defeats the Dragon and Seneschal. When he discovers the whole process was a test of will and it was his turn to set a dragon loose on the world to search for another Arisen, who may or may not have the will to fight and survive. The arisen you control chose not to. Instead, he committed suicide to end the cycle.

The game starts out with the quote, "the delightful and ever novel pleasure of a useless occupation".

And you dont really know what that quote means until you finish the game. But I suspect that in the context of this game, it means being the Seneschal is a useless occupation.




I don't believe the quote at the beginning is put there as an aphoristic description of the Arisens story. While it works on the level that all humans and dragons and seneschal and arisens go about their tasks oblivious of their meaningless nature in the context of the great chain, this specific quote, I believe is intended for the developer and gamer in a more meta context.

It's a quote from Henri de Regnier, a turn of the century French poet and novelist, and is most well known for being attached to a suite of waltzes composed by Ravel in the early 20th century.
The quote, in its original French, implores a feeling of guiltless enjoyment of meaningless undertakings for their own sake. For the developer the act of creating the game can be seen as ultimately worthless, not financially obviously, but philosophically ... And for the gamer, indulging in hours of fruitless fantasy is a "useless occupation" but should be enjoyed nonetheless for its own sake, and it's novel pleasures.
It's significance with regard to Ravel's waltzes should also not be misses, as his Valses nobles et sentimentales were composed with the intent of encompassing all aspects of the musical genre, and likewise Dragons Dogma, also prefacing the work with this Regnier quote as Ravel did, can be viewed as an homage to all the well known cliched aspects of the fantasy genre (including its DD title being an homage to Dungeons and Dragons). Where Ravel created his indulgent pieces (I say indulgent, because traditionally a waltz is unabashedly crafted as dance music without any contstraints or pretense at artistic innovation, I/e ever novel and useless) encompassing all the meter and movements of waltzes, so too did itsuno create his game to encompass all the facets of traditional fantasy, knights and kings, dragons and magic, fortresses and dungeons, classes and combat, heroes and quests.

TLDR version:
It's my feeling that Itsuno included the quote at the beginning purposefully to mirror Ravel .. And for the same meta context reasons.
It does not necessarily have anything to do with the games narrative. It's a literary homage, not a narrative commentary.

....
---
http://i.imgur.com/q796o.gif
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgTXj2eTJmc