A rational argument why Nintendo will not survive to 2015.

#41KaosAssassinPosted 12/19/2012 12:33:23 AM
Yes mothers are worried about breakable glass screens when every kid owns an iPod or a ds and you never hear complaints about those screens breaking
#42Virtue777Posted 12/19/2012 12:40:03 AM(edited)
I think we're heading towards another video game crash, but I don't think Sony, Microsoft or Nintendo have much to do with it. Games are just really expensive to develop now, and people demand unrealistic, low prices or they won't buy. People complain about paying $60 for a game, but I really doubt they actually grew up with video games. During the NES/SNES era we payed anywhere from $40 to $80 for a video game, when $40 meant quite a bit more (this was when you could still go to McDonalds and get a plain hamburger for a quarter). These games had development teams of less than 30 people generally, and far, far smaller budgets with development cycles lasting less than 6 months.

We're hitting a point where only these huge mega corporations can find any chance at success when it comes to making a full-fledged video game. Indie gaming will continue to thrive and mobile gaming isn't going anywhere any time soon, but I think we're hitting a point where one of the big three is going to exit the competition. For developers there's simply not much profit to be had and too much risk involved right now, and there's not going to be any need for 3 competing platforms.
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#43TalentedMPosted 12/19/2012 12:42:47 AM
Virtue777 posted...
I think we're heading towards another video game crash, but I don't think Sony, Microsoft or Nintendo have much to do with it. Games are just really expensive to develop now, and people demand unrealistic, low prices or they won't buy. People complain about paying $60 for a game, but I really doubt they actually grew up with video games. During the NES/SNES era we payed anywhere from $40 to $80 for a video game, when $40 meant quite a bit more (this was when you could still go to McDonalds and get a plain hamburger for a quarter). These games had development teams of less than 30 people generally, and far, far smaller budgets with development cycles lasting less than 6 months.

We're hitting a point where only these huge mega corporations can find any chance at success when it comes to making a full-fledged video game. Indie gaming will continue to thrive and mobile gaming isn't going anywhere any time soon, but I think we're hitting a point where one of the big three is going to exit the competition. For developers there's simply not much profit to be had and too much risk involved right now, and there's not going to be any need for 3 competing platforms.


Indie gaming is our only hope for the future of creative games without just trying to milk a property for what it is worth.
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#44DiscostewSMPosted 12/19/2012 12:51:03 AM
KaosAssassin posted...
Yes mothers are worried about breakable glass screens when every kid owns an iPod or a ds and you never hear complaints about those screens breaking


Totally true. Last Christmas we had a get together with family, cousins, relatives, etc, and in one room were all the kids ranging from 3 to 7, all playing with iPods, Android phones, etc.

Then again, you've got grown men here making posts like sitting on their Gamepad, and people are worried about kids being irresponsible?
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#45niels200683Posted 12/19/2012 12:54:51 AM
Not so rational.

The wii U only really needs to be a success in one region to survive to 2015.
It launched with a new Monster Hunter game in Japan.

Monster hunter is big in Japan, hence - Nintendo will easily survive this gen.
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#46Virtue777Posted 12/19/2012 12:57:28 AM
TalentedM posted...
Virtue777 posted...
I think we're heading towards another video game crash, but I don't think Sony, Microsoft or Nintendo have much to do with it. Games are just really expensive to develop now, and people demand unrealistic, low prices or they won't buy. People complain about paying $60 for a game, but I really doubt they actually grew up with video games. During the NES/SNES era we payed anywhere from $40 to $80 for a video game, when $40 meant quite a bit more (this was when you could still go to McDonalds and get a plain hamburger for a quarter). These games had development teams of less than 30 people generally, and far, far smaller budgets with development cycles lasting less than 6 months.

We're hitting a point where only these huge mega corporations can find any chance at success when it comes to making a full-fledged video game. Indie gaming will continue to thrive and mobile gaming isn't going anywhere any time soon, but I think we're hitting a point where one of the big three is going to exit the competition. For developers there's simply not much profit to be had and too much risk involved right now, and there's not going to be any need for 3 competing platforms.


Indie gaming is our only hope for the future of creative games without just trying to milk a property for what it is worth.


I agree. But at the same time, I can't blame EA, Activision, and SE for milking their franchises. Not at all. It's the only way to compete, unfortunately. Look at THQ as a prime example. They're one of the few companies who doesn't repeatedly milk franchises in the brutal fashion and high frequency the other gaming giants are. And they're failing.

There's just simply no way to compete right now until consumer satisfaction drops to an all-time low, similar to what happened with the video game crash in the 80's. Then, and only then, will other companies be able to develop grand-scale games of high quality and secure a profit. The big (and scary) difference between game development now, and game development in the 80's...Whereas it took 6 months to make a quality game in the 80's, these days it can take 6 years unless the game is building upon an already established game engine with pre-existing models. We may hit a sort of "gaming apocalypse" where console video gaming almost vanishes, and it may not resurface for upwards 10 years. There are a lot of factors to look at, a lot of unknowns and ideas that can be capitalized on.

What do I think is going to happen? I think within the next 5 years, console gaming is going to become less and less popular. Within 10 years, it will no longer be mainstream, and only the dedicated will continue purchasing consoles and video games (meaning that, more than likely, at least 2 of the big three console developers will exit the market). In 15 years, video games will resurface using new and innovating virtual interfacing technology that replicates "VR" unlike anything we've seen before.
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#47excitebike64Posted 12/19/2012 12:58:30 AM
I almost expected something rational but was quickly disappointed.
#48BuretsuPosted 12/19/2012 12:59:24 AM
A rational argument why Nintendo will not survive to 2015:

The world will end in 2 days, on December 21, 2012.
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no i tried resetting game i even start violent slamming cartridge on wall but all it does make static noise when i put into DS, the problem not fix! -ReconUnit
#49supremeblasterPosted 12/19/2012 1:08:55 AM
Excuse me...uh...what part of that was rational?
#50geneticsftwPosted 12/19/2012 1:14:39 AM
Buretsu posted...
A rational argument why Nintendo will not survive to 2015:

The world will end in 2 days, on December 21, 2012.


Thanks for the reminder.