There's a reason graphics in games like Uncharted or FFXIII look better

#11AkagehisaPosted 2/1/2013 8:18:47 AM
Zato Infinite posted...
TC: You feel a little better now after getting that off your chest? Sounds like you lost a lot of sleep because of this.


lol, nintendo fans talking about graphics,,
#12blablablax17Posted 2/1/2013 8:23:32 AM
Exellent point TC.
This always comes to mind when people complain about Skyrim's graphics, but i think they're great for such an open world game.
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#13omniryuPosted 2/1/2013 8:31:34 AM
digiblaster posted...
Games like those two mentioned are, for the most part, very linear. This means that a lot of the areas in the game aren't accessible, and so high detail is only necessary for smaller parts of the game world. I'm not saying that this is always the case; when FFXIII opens up, the areas become far more expansive, and it still looks beautiful. Still, since the other two consoles are somewhat limited in terms of what they can do, 'tricks' like that are utilised to make the game appear better than the console should technically be able to handle.

And that's what makes 'X' so appealing. I haven't actually played Xenoblade yet, but it's my understanding that if you can see something, you can probably get to it. I can only assume, but I'd imagine it's similar with 'X'. The game itself looks brilliant, but if we can get anywhere in that world, which is much more expansive than most of the games I've played on current-gen consoles, then it's much more technically impressive than it seems.


Whenever I play a 3D Zelda (even a 2D one). I always wanted to go where I can't go.
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#14digiblaster(Topic Creator)Posted 2/1/2013 8:36:06 AM
omniryu posted...
digiblaster posted...
Games like those two mentioned are, for the most part, very linear. This means that a lot of the areas in the game aren't accessible, and so high detail is only necessary for smaller parts of the game world. I'm not saying that this is always the case; when FFXIII opens up, the areas become far more expansive, and it still looks beautiful. Still, since the other two consoles are somewhat limited in terms of what they can do, 'tricks' like that are utilised to make the game appear better than the console should technically be able to handle.

And that's what makes 'X' so appealing. I haven't actually played Xenoblade yet, but it's my understanding that if you can see something, you can probably get to it. I can only assume, but I'd imagine it's similar with 'X'. The game itself looks brilliant, but if we can get anywhere in that world, which is much more expansive than most of the games I've played on current-gen consoles, then it's much more technically impressive than it seems.


Whenever I play a 3D Zelda (even a 2D one). I always wanted to go where I can't go.


We haven't seen any footage of a Wii U Zelda yet. I doubt it will be quite as expansive as 'X' appears to be, but the power of the Wii U seems to permit strong graphics as well as scope.

What I'm trying to say is that while the graphics may not look much better than other platforms, what 'X' does requires a lot of power, and it's very technically impressive.
#15GLDanzegoPosted 2/1/2013 8:36:16 PM
OtakuGamera posted...
Sure it does. Perhaps not in the same exact way it works in God of War, but you're still limited in how far you can deviate from the main path (that being VERY limited). By doing so, he developers don't have to concentrate on making everything beyond where you can go anything but background graphics.

that's true, but does it happen in uncharted? no. you do have sprawling city with tons of civilians like the desert city in uncharted.

Additionally, there are other tricks that developers use such as not rendering anything that the camera can't see and, a big one in Uncharted, the ever annoying lower than standard res textures of anything that's not within a few feet of the main character (anyone with a working pair of eyes should be able to pick up on this one). That's not to say Uncharted looks bad or anything, but the fact that the player is confined to a certain path most of the time does have a LOT to do with how good it looks.

that technique is not limited to uncharted, tons of games does this whether open world or not.

Certainly, you're not actually trying to suggest that if Naughty Dog opened the environments way up like GTA or even Xenoblade that Uncharted would still look like it does.....right?

i am and it will


1) Yes, it happens in Uncharted. In fact, 95% of the Uncharted games are like what I'm talking about. Which part of which Uncharted game are you talking about? Be more specific.

2) I never said nor implied that Uncharted was the only game to use this. What I did say was "developers" use it.

3) If that's what you think, then you need to stop discussing this because you know nothing about making games.
#16PendragoonPosted 2/1/2013 9:02:12 PM
This is exactly why I still consider Just Cause 2 to be the best technical achievement on the HD consoles. Xenoblade is the best technical achievement on Wii as well. Scale and large worlds always wins over a pretty corridor.


Ni No Kuni wins for best use of art style, it is a wonder to play.
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#17SychinLegacyPosted 2/1/2013 9:05:27 PM
digiblaster posted...
Games like those two mentioned are, for the most part, very linear. This means that a lot of the areas in the game aren't accessible, and so high detail is only necessary for smaller parts of the game world. I'm not saying that this is always the case; when FFXIII opens up, the areas become far more expansive, and it still looks beautiful. Still, since the other two consoles are somewhat limited in terms of what they can do, 'tricks' like that are utilised to make the game appear better than the console should technically be able to handle.

And that's what makes 'X' so appealing. I haven't actually played Xenoblade yet, but it's my understanding that if you can see something, you can probably get to it. I can only assume, but I'd imagine it's similar with 'X'. The game itself looks brilliant, but if we can get anywhere in that world, which is much more expansive than most of the games I've played on current-gen consoles, then it's much more technically impressive than it seems.


You're confusing linear with open. Open world means that you can go pretty much anywhere as opposed to closed where you can only go to predetermined "levels". Linear is in relation to the story meaning it follows a concrete specific story line every time from start to finish without straying from the path. The only changes are optional details like side quests that don't affect the overall story. Nonlinear stories are where there are different arcs and outcomes to the story that change based on what the player does.
#18GLDanzegoPosted 2/2/2013 3:59:16 AM
SychinLegacy posted...
digiblaster posted...
Games like those two mentioned are, for the most part, very linear. This means that a lot of the areas in the game aren't accessible, and so high detail is only necessary for smaller parts of the game world. I'm not saying that this is always the case; when FFXIII opens up, the areas become far more expansive, and it still looks beautiful. Still, since the other two consoles are somewhat limited in terms of what they can do, 'tricks' like that are utilised to make the game appear better than the console should technically be able to handle.

And that's what makes 'X' so appealing. I haven't actually played Xenoblade yet, but it's my understanding that if you can see something, you can probably get to it. I can only assume, but I'd imagine it's similar with 'X'. The game itself looks brilliant, but if we can get anywhere in that world, which is much more expansive than most of the games I've played on current-gen consoles, then it's much more technically impressive than it seems.


You're confusing linear with open. Open world means that you can go pretty much anywhere as opposed to closed where you can only go to predetermined "levels". Linear is in relation to the story meaning it follows a concrete specific story line every time from start to finish without straying from the path. The only changes are optional details like side quests that don't affect the overall story. Nonlinear stories are where there are different arcs and outcomes to the story that change based on what the player does.


Linear is just an attribute used to describe different things. In the case of videogames, it can be used to describe storyline, level design, level progression, character growth and other things. It's not just something that refers to the storyline.
#19JackTheRimmerPosted 2/2/2013 4:05:28 AM(edited)
GTA5 / topic
#20DarkZV2BetaPosted 2/2/2013 4:17:12 AM
OtakuGamera posted...
i am and it will


You're wrong and it won't.
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