Look at this 5-year Nintendo stock chart, CAN THEY RECOVER, & HOW?

#1TheGameOfLifePosted 2/17/2013 1:55:36 PM
5 years ago shares peaked at roughly $70, now it's about $11.

Copy & Paste to see:

http://investing.money.msn.com/investments/equity-charts?CA=0&CB=0&CC=0&CD=0&D4=1&DD=1&D5=0&DCS=2&MA0=0&MA1=0&C5=0&C5D=0&C6=0&C7=0&C7D=0&C8=0&C9=0&CF=0&D8=0&DB=0&DC=0&D9=0&DA=0&D1=0&symbol=ntdoy&SZ=0&PT=9

So they lost ALL the gains from the original Wii. And now Wii U is not selling up to par.
On top of that, now there is the Steam service, iPads, etc. flooding the market allowing generally cheaper games on other platforms, even of the very same game.

So if you were the main CEO of Nintendo, what strategy(s) would you immediately begin to incorporate?

(For tech heads:)
On a side note, why didn't Nintendo for their Wii U use an old G5 based multi-core CPU (which are in the xbox 360's) instead of STILL using the EVEN OLDER G3 based chip that they used in the Gamecube and Wii. Sure they upped the clock speed but it is still basically a souped-up G3 processor! A lot of people think it's because they want easy backwards compatibility but the G5 although more advanced is still within the G3/G4/G5 IBM PPC family. Is Nintendo really THAT CHEAP?
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#2AceMosPosted 2/17/2013 2:00:02 PM
be more worried about sony stock
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#3AsuirPosted 2/17/2013 2:00:05 PM
Off topic.

Also, here's a better link.

http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/charts/charts.asp?ticker=7974:JP
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Ftw!
#4icarus231Posted 2/17/2013 2:00:27 PM
TheGameOfLife posted...
5 years ago shares peaked at roughly $70, now it's about $11.

Copy & Paste to see:

http://investing.money.msn.com/investments/equity-charts?CA=0&CB=0&CC=0&CD=0&D4=1&DD=1&D5=0&DCS=2&MA0=0&MA1=0&C5=0&C5D=0&C6=0&C7=0&C7D=0&C8=0&C9=0&CF=0&D8=0&DB=0&DC=0&D9=0&DA=0&D1=0&symbol=ntdoy&SZ=0&PT=9

So they lost ALL the gains from the original Wii. And now Wii U is not selling up to par.
On top of that, now there is the Steam service, iPads, etc. flooding the market allowing generally cheaper games on other platforms, even of the very same game.

So if you were the main CEO of Nintendo, what strategy(s) would you immediately begin to incorporate?

(For tech heads:)
On a side note, why didn't Nintendo for their Wii U use an old G5 based multi-core CPU (which are in the xbox 360's) instead of STILL using the EVEN OLDER G3 based chip that they used in the Gamecube and Wii. Sure they upped the clock speed but it is still basically a souped-up G3 processor! A lot of people think it's because they want easy backwards compatibility but the G5 although more advanced is still within the G3/G4/G5 IBM PPC family. Is Nintendo really THAT CHEAP?
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you really should look at the tokyo exchange for a more accurate picture.
#5LifelessBoyPosted 2/17/2013 2:00:55 PM
AceMos posted...
be more worried about sony stock


On the first post ladies and gentlemen!
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Don't flame me bro. GT: YFAL Putipuelko - PSN: LifelessLoser - Steam ID: YFAL_Putipuelko
#6Sharky8Posted 2/17/2013 2:04:27 PM(edited)
You do understand that stock does not benefit a company, right?

The only time a company gets money is during the initial public offering (IPO), when they first offer stock to the public, when a percentage of the company is sold (the stock) in exchange an investment in the company (cash the company receives). After that, every time person B sells stock to person C, then person C sells to person D, and so forth, the company doesn't gain anything from those sales.

Stock only indicates the public's perception of how a company is doing, but it is in no way related to any net gain or net loss of money a company will receive from investors. Nintendo doesn't NEED investors today, so the rollercoaster ride of their stock doesn't hurt or help them even in the public's mind.

The only investment a company like Nintendo needed was during the IPO when the stock was first sold to the public.

It's interesting to see how crazy people were for Nintendo during the height the Wii's popularity, but they were just buying stock under the assumption it was going to keep going up. At which point they would sell it. It was all a game for traders, and it meant very little to Nintendo.
#7MR_Smarty_PantsPosted 2/17/2013 2:02:40 PM
AceMos posted...
be more worried about sony stock


Yeah but Sony may have a console coming out that people actually want. It's already clear the Wii U is not going to be a big success. People just aren't interested in it.
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Proud owner of the Wii U!
#8samuspwns3Posted 2/17/2013 2:02:56 PM
AceMos posted...
be more worried about sony stock


junk status lol. i think that's why ponies troll this board so much. Sony is the one failing not Nintendo.
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:D
#9AsuirPosted 2/17/2013 2:03:00 PM
http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/charts/charts.asp?ticker=6758:JP

That's for Sony. There're a bit behind Nintendo. Not as much as people would seem to think.
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Ftw!
#10rudgerlightPosted 2/17/2013 2:03:03 PM
The truth is, the stock was waaaay overvalued 5 years ago. Investors threw their money at Nintendo cause the Wii sold, but as we know now, there was little reason to believe it had built a solid foundation for consistent growth.

Now they're being severely undervalued. They've launched a successful handheld that has (finally) begun printing money. They've released the Wii U, which isn't doing well, but at least lets them focus again on promoting a system. The losses from the system's R&D can begin return once their software is (again, finally) released, and they clearly haven't spent their marketing budget yet to push the system.

Sidenote: it isn't cheap to create a completely custom GPU/CPU combo. It wouldn't matter what it's based. Custom is custom, and custom is always pricier than simply buying power in bulk. You're deluding yourself if you think otherwise. You don't have to like it, or be impressed by it, but don't make up nonsense.