The way that Nintendo designed the Wii Remote/Sensor Bar was brilliant

#1iKhanicPosted 6/24/2013 6:22:33 PM
So if you didn't know, they basically use IR sensing. But interestingly, the Sensor Bar emits IR light, while the Wii Remote actually senses it.

I just realized how brilliant of a design that is, because it makes the technology extremely upgradable. An IR emitting device can't really be upgraded when you think about it (aside from emitting more or less IR light, which would just effect the sensitivity). But you can upgrade a sensor to be more robust and accurate (and who knows what else, Nintendo's pretty creative with technology) , so by making the remote the sensor, Nintendo has allowed themselves to bring in better motion controls after they have released a system.

Just some food for thought.
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#2trenton97Posted 6/24/2013 6:27:52 PM
Hmm, I guess that's why I don't work at Ninty.
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#3Nerreltron9000Posted 6/24/2013 6:37:02 PM
But the remote is so much more expensive than the sensor bar that it would be much simpler to upgrade the bar, not the remote. Not that there's much of a meaningful way to upgrade it anyway.
#4iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 6/24/2013 6:45:44 PM
Nerreltron9000 posted...
But the remote is so much more expensive than the sensor bar that it would be much simpler to upgrade the bar, not the remote. Not that there's much of a meaningful way to upgrade it anyway.


Well, I'm not exactly sure what is communicated between the sensor bar and console. If it is anything other than power, then you run into the issue of the sensor bar not being compatible with the console.
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Not changing this sig until we get a new main series Tales game released on a Nintendo console in the US
Dictator of the Zelda Wii U Board
#5DiscostewSMPosted 6/24/2013 6:58:28 PM
At night, when I'm having a romantic dinner with my girl, I light two candles, then pull out my Wiimote....
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......because candles actually work as a sensor bar alternative.....
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.....then she turns on the ceiling lights, but I can use those too.
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#6Nerreltron9000Posted 6/24/2013 7:34:53 PM
iKhanic posted...

Well, I'm not exactly sure what is communicated between the sensor bar and console.


The sensor bar has two sets of infared LEDs (one strip at each end). The camera in the remote detects the LEDs and sends data to the system about their perceived position.

You can see this yourself in real time in the system settings when you adjust the remote sensitivity. The two white dots you see onscreen are the LED strips. Any movement you make with the remote causes them to "move" in the opposite direction. Games use that motion data to manipulate the cursor on screen.

I don't see any real way to improve the technology. The remote already does a good job of rejecting interference from other light sources (that's what the black cover over the camera is for) and the cursor tracking is pretty fast and reliable.