Do you guys think that maybe the game industry is being destroyed by a luxury...

#1NeoN1976Posted 10/5/2013 10:11:41 PM
By luxury I mean the ability to blog, tweet, and rant on forums & youtube?

I feel like back in the days of the Snes and Sega when the only way we could share our opinions of a game was with our money or word of mouth from friend to friend games were much better plus we were just glad to have a new game, and dev's probably felt less pressure not to mention that you either liked a game or you didn't and games were complete with no needed patches despite the fact that profit margins were thinner because the games were on cartridges and yeah Some games could go for as much as $80 or more but they were worth it if not for just gameplay but length in hours....

So I guess what I'm getting at is do you believe all the chat, forums,blogging and youtube ranting has destroyed gaming because dev's are desperately trying to please everyone?
#2InnerscopePosted 10/5/2013 10:12:51 PM
Production cost is too high
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#3NeoN1976(Topic Creator)Posted 10/5/2013 10:15:11 PM
Innerscope posted...
Production cost is too high


I TOTALLY AGREE!!!!!
#4NickTheBlitzPosted 10/5/2013 10:28:08 PM
Ranting and raving happened in the 90's. Maybe there weren't any forums as developed as the current ones, but it still happened. Word of mouth is a powerful thing, and I can remember a time when you were either a Nintendo kid or a Sega kid. The way gamers whine and argue over their consoles now? The same thing happened back then--it was just in person.

(On an unrelated note, internet use in social media and online gaming has "ruined" the community in and of itself. It's presently commonplace to be cursed out--viciously--by an absolute stranger, over the act of simply playing the game. This almost never happened in the era of arcades; because you were face-to-face with your competitor, you respected each other after even the most humiliating defeat. If gamers talked the way they did during the arcade days, they'd readily get knuckle sandwich.)

What's killing the gaming industry isn't our ability to communicate amongst eachother. It's the ridiculously unsustainable business models and production costs. The (western) gaming industry decided to mimic the film industry, and it's not paying off too well. Every month we hear about another big player laying off employees or downsizing in general.

The problem is, devs want to create games with Hollywood budgets; but gaming doesn't operate on the same circumstances as film. A major film production can cost hundreds of millions; but they can get it back because the access to the product is inherently simple. Anyone of almost any age can be a moviegoer, and at just $7-$10 a pop, it's an easy medium for people to buy into. But gamers are a relatively niche market--especially so compared to the average moviegoer. And even if gaming is as mainstream as moviegoing, a gamer still requires the requisite console and between $15-$70 to buy the product. Ergo, devs want a Hollywood budget, but lack both the market size and the pricepoint that Hollywood operates within.
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#5LvthnPosted 10/5/2013 10:59:45 PM
You actually mentioned one of the real reasons the industry is struggling. Back then games cost $50-$90 depending on game and where you bought it. A $50 game adjusted for inflation is roughly a $100 game today. Even deducting the cost of the cartridge, production costs were lower, and games that did have high production costs and lower sales, like RPGs, cost more. They also didn't have to bother with ongoing support, if the "final" version had major bugs, tough tatas. FF3/6 released with a list of about 300 bugs, the original release with one that could destroy your file and maybe brick your cart (that was fixed with a later revision, but obviously no patch was available for those who got the 1.0 version).

Players clamored for games with "story driven" gaming, full voice acting, and hundreds of hours of play, with online. The industry DELIVERED, and did so with the average game at retail still costing $50-$60, with ongoing support, and with the 1.0 release typically being just fine out of box for those who don't have internet. That costs a few million to do.

Believe it or not an NES cost about as much as a PS4 does after inflation. The main "value" difference was that the NES came with a bundled game by default, with a value after inflation of about $100 - but obviously the NES didn't come with a Blu Ray player, wireless card, wireless controllers, and a hard drive. When I was young gamers probably got 3-5 games per year, at least half of which were probably bargain bin fare (either trashy games, or several year old games - games didn't go down in price nearly as fast, either). Now I can easily buy a game or two per month if I like, more if I buy used.

This is of course why Nintendo still turns a profit. Their consoles don't include Blu Ray, HDD, or significant media options. Their games may have limited or no voice acting, obviously reuse assets (after sprucing them up, of course), go by certain proven formulas, and have a quarter century of nostalgia to cash in on, and because they have little 3rd party support, Nintendo customers will buy many if not most of their 1st party offerings. Although clearly even Nintendo struggles to keep up anymore, given that they don't hold a monopoly on an industry that in today's money would charge $100-$180 per game for stuff that cost a hundred thousand and two dozen guys to develop.

It's good business sense, of course, but it's become clear that the public demands an awful lot these days.
#6BloodychessPosted 10/5/2013 11:05:36 PM
The industry is being destroyed by the consumers. We're so caught up in trivial s*** that we can't even see how terrible policies and game quality have become.
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#7kobalobasileusPosted 10/5/2013 11:26:35 PM
NeoN1976 posted...
Innerscope posted...
Production cost is too high


I TOTALLY AGREE!!!!!


This.
#8AH88Posted 10/5/2013 11:46:28 PM
Innerscope posted...
Production cost is too high


This is the biggest problem. It's leading to companies taking less risk and sticking to the same old formula and if a game doesn't hit 4+ million in sales, it's a failure no matter how highly rated it was.(For some companies at least *cough* Square Enix *cough*)
#9ElectricMolePosted 10/5/2013 11:50:01 PM
kobalobasileus posted...
NeoN1976 posted...
Innerscope posted...
Production cost is too high


I TOTALLY AGREE!!!!!


This.



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#10uneedtowakeupPosted 10/6/2013 12:01:09 AM
Everything was better in the 80/90's (besides Cars)

.....it was bound to happen to video games too.

Enjoy it because things will get worse and worse, and society will get more and more stupid.

And to answer your question, yes, social media, downloadable games, online gaming, patches, item purchases, updates, installs etc has partly ruined video games.

High production costs and little innovation is probably the main reason though.

********* I feel console gamers should just go out and buy a PC/laptop to game instead, as its becoming the same bloody thing!!!