What's with the infatuation with how many games a console has?

#1The_RamiPosted 10/5/2013 10:35:12 PM
Is it just me, or do we care way too much about how many games a console has nowadays? I don't know about you, but there are way too many games available that I'd like to play for how many hours there are in a day..

Unless you seriously have a ton of free time, and I mean you don't even have a job or school or anything to do other than game, I actually think the whole thing is blown out of proportion. I have owned the PS3 for 5 years now and there are seriously hundreds of games that I still want to play, and I play it daily.

When I get the Wii U this year it'll be obviously less games, but still more than enough for me to play, let alone complain..
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#2Cowboy082288Posted 10/5/2013 10:44:32 PM
The_Rami posted...
Is it just me, or do we care way too much about how many games a console has nowadays? I don't know about you, but there are way too many games available that I'd like to play for how many hours there are in a day..

Unless you seriously have a ton of free time, and I mean you don't even have a job or school or anything to do other than game, I actually think the whole thing is blown out of proportion. I have owned the PS3 for 5 years now and there are seriously hundreds of games that I still want to play, and I play it daily.

When I get the Wii U this year it'll be obviously less games, but still more than enough for me to play, let alone complain..


How many games a consoles has reflects how many choices a console owner has. The interest in how many games are available has nothing to do with trying to play every single one of them.
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PSN/XBL/Steam - cowboyoni
#3_FalstaffPosted 10/5/2013 11:01:09 PM
TC has a point, though. In Western culture, particularly America, we're obsessed with providing an absurd number of choices to the consumer in the interest of maximizing personal freedom. Many times, the sheer number of choices simply paralyzes the consumer and instead of choosing the best possible option, they choose nothing at all for the fear that if they choose something and don't like it, they feel it's their fault, because surely they could have made a better choice.

For example, in one famous study, participants were given a choice of retirement plans. One group was presented with dozens of choices. Another group had just three. The group with only three choices had a much higher participation rate than the group with dozens.
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#4Cowboy082288Posted 10/5/2013 11:11:59 PM
_Falstaff posted...
TC has a point, though. In Western culture, particularly America, we're obsessed with providing an absurd number of choices to the consumer in the interest of maximizing personal freedom. Many times, the sheer number of choices simply paralyzes the consumer and instead of choosing the best possible option, they choose nothing at all for the fear that if they choose something and don't like it, they feel it's their fault, because surely they could have made a better choice.

For example, in one famous study, participants were given a choice of retirement plans. One group was presented with dozens of choices. Another group had just three. The group with only three choices had a much higher participation rate than the group with dozens.


Are you seriously trying to rationalize that more games available on a system is a bad thing?
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PSN/XBL/Steam - cowboyoni
#5sonicnewboyPosted 10/5/2013 11:52:47 PM
Cowboy082288 posted...
_Falstaff posted...
TC has a point, though. In Western culture, particularly America, we're obsessed with providing an absurd number of choices to the consumer in the interest of maximizing personal freedom. Many times, the sheer number of choices simply paralyzes the consumer and instead of choosing the best possible option, they choose nothing at all for the fear that if they choose something and don't like it, they feel it's their fault, because surely they could have made a better choice.

For example, in one famous study, participants were given a choice of retirement plans. One group was presented with dozens of choices. Another group had just three. The group with only three choices had a much higher participation rate than the group with dozens.


Are you seriously trying to rationalize that more games available on a system is a bad thing?


Actually, he's not trying to rationalize it. He's just providing us with examples of when more choices are not necessarily good. I am taking an evolutionary psychology class and I have also read about some studies that showed that more choice is not necessarily better. I will see if I can try to find the book and the examples.

But yes, this person has a point. We tend to think that more choices are better, but this is not the case often times.

And yes, I found it! Here's an excerpt from the book I am reading:

"The freedom-of-choice paradox: The more options one has, the more possibilities for experiencing conflict arise, and the more difficult it becomes to compare the options. There is a point where more options, products, and choices hurt both the seller and the consumer."

Gut Feelings, 2007.

It seems kind of counterintuitive, but it's what the research has shown so far.
#6Cowboy082288Posted 10/6/2013 12:24:32 AM
sonicnewboy posted...
Cowboy082288 posted...
_Falstaff posted...
TC has a point, though. In Western culture, particularly America, we're obsessed with providing an absurd number of choices to the consumer in the interest of maximizing personal freedom. Many times, the sheer number of choices simply paralyzes the consumer and instead of choosing the best possible option, they choose nothing at all for the fear that if they choose something and don't like it, they feel it's their fault, because surely they could have made a better choice.

For example, in one famous study, participants were given a choice of retirement plans. One group was presented with dozens of choices. Another group had just three. The group with only three choices had a much higher participation rate than the group with dozens.


Are you seriously trying to rationalize that more games available on a system is a bad thing?


Actually, he's not trying to rationalize it. He's just providing us with examples of when more choices are not necessarily good. I am taking an evolutionary psychology class and I have also read about some studies that showed that more choice is not necessarily better. I will see if I can try to find the book and the examples.

But yes, this person has a point. We tend to think that more choices are better, but this is not the case often times.

And yes, I found it! Here's an excerpt from the book I am reading:

"The freedom-of-choice paradox: The more options one has, the more possibilities for experiencing conflict arise, and the more difficult it becomes to compare the options. There is a point where more options, products, and choices hurt both the seller and the consumer."

Gut Feelings, 2007.

It seems kind of counterintuitive, but it's what the research has shown so far.


Ok first off that is a quote in a void. They could vary well be talking about what a single seller is offering. Such as a film studio should make just one version of a movie released in theatres, not 10 different versions of a movie. Just like nintendo should offer one new smash bro. game for the Wii U, not 5 different versions.

The example of a retirement plan doesn't hold up, because it's different versions of the same thing that a potential buyer has expressed interest in. That is not the same as having say a choice of getting the next mario game or a racing sim. They are very different products from each other, a person interested in one may have no interest in the other. So there is no experiencing conflict.

When a person goes to buy a game, say GTA5, they don't go 'ok now let me compare that game to every other game on the PS3 that I don't own before I buy it'. The person has no interest in those backlog of games, so no conflict arises. That person just goes to the store and buys the one game they want.

Seriously, saying more games on a system is a bad thing is like saying having more songs available for purchase in iTunes is a bad thing.
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PSN/XBL/Steam - cowboyoni
#7demesjos2Posted 10/6/2013 12:30:16 AM
It's not just the number of games but also the genres represented. Take the wii-u, I love RPGs. How many RPGs does it have? 0. Monster hunter is not an RPG and I'm not counting vc. Also im not counting mass effect 3 since it was widely available on ps3 and 360 long before the wii-u release. There is also a lack of sport games, racers and shooters beyond COD. The wii-u will be the goto system for platformers but it's lacking in other options.
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Currently playing - SMT IV, Suikoden V, waiting on Tales of Xilia to arrive at my door
#8sonicnewboyPosted 10/6/2013 12:33:15 AM
Cowboy082288 posted...
sonicnewboy posted...
Cowboy082288 posted...
_Falstaff posted...
TC has a point, though. In Western culture, particularly America, we're obsessed with providing an absurd number of choices to the consumer in the interest of maximizing personal freedom. Many times, the sheer number of choices simply paralyzes the consumer and instead of choosing the best possible option, they choose nothing at all for the fear that if they choose something and don't like it, they feel it's their fault, because surely they could have made a better choice.

For example, in one famous study, participants were given a choice of retirement plans. One group was presented with dozens of choices. Another group had just three. The group with only three choices had a much higher participation rate than the group with dozens.


Are you seriously trying to rationalize that more games available on a system is a bad thing?


Actually, he's not trying to rationalize it. He's just providing us with examples of when more choices are not necessarily good. I am taking an evolutionary psychology class and I have also read about some studies that showed that more choice is not necessarily better. I will see if I can try to find the book and the examples.

But yes, this person has a point. We tend to think that more choices are better, but this is not the case often times.

And yes, I found it! Here's an excerpt from the book I am reading:

"The freedom-of-choice paradox: The more options one has, the more possibilities for experiencing conflict arise, and the more difficult it becomes to compare the options. There is a point where more options, products, and choices hurt both the seller and the consumer."

Gut Feelings, 2007.

It seems kind of counterintuitive, but it's what the research has shown so far.


Ok first off that is a quote in a void. They could vary well be talking about what a single seller is offering. Such as a film studio should make just one version of a movie released in theatres, not 10 different versions of a movie. Just like nintendo should offer one new smash bro. game for the Wii U, not 5 different versions.

The example of a retirement plan doesn't hold up, because it's different versions of the same thing that a potential buyer has expressed interest in. That is not the same as having say a choice of getting the next mario game or a racing sim. They are very different products from each other, a person interested in one may have no interest in the other. So there is no experiencing conflict.

When a person goes to buy a game, say GTA5, they don't go 'ok now let me compare that game to every other game on the PS3 that I don't own before I buy it'. The person has no interest in those backlog of games, so no conflict arises. That person just goes to the store and buys the one game they want.

Seriously, saying more games on a system is a bad thing is like saying having more songs available for purchase in iTunes is a bad thing.


Yes, I see what you're saying, but not every video game consumer goes into a store with that kind of mindset. Some people actually do compare video games to one another purchase--I for one, research my games before hand to make sure that I am getting the better bang for my buck, and will look at reviews and compare different games.

And didn't the Wii sell pretty well, considering how it didn't have that many games to choose from (at least compared to the Xbox and ps3)?

I mean, Nintendo has been known for making systems that don't get very much 3rd party support, yet they are still pretty successful IMO. They haven't gone under, at least.
#9Cowboy082288Posted 10/6/2013 12:48:03 AM
sonicnewboy posted...

Yes, I see what you're saying, but not every video game consumer goes into a store with that kind of mindset. Some people actually do compare video games to one another purchase--I for one, research my games before hand to make sure that I am getting the better bang for my buck, and will look at reviews and compare different games.

And didn't the Wii sell pretty well, considering how it didn't have that many games to choose from (at least compared to the Xbox and ps3)?

I mean, Nintendo has been known for making systems that don't get very much 3rd party support, yet they are still pretty successful IMO. They haven't gone under, at least.


Thats not a good comparison:
http://www.vgchartz.com/platforms/

Wii has 2,751 titles
Wii U has 115

Also the wii is Nintendo's best selling console ever, it also has the largest game library of any Nintendo console. You can also see on that list that the most successful console in history (PS2) also had the largest game library of all the consoles.
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PSN/XBL/Steam - cowboyoni
#10sonicnewboyPosted 10/6/2013 12:54:22 AM
Cowboy082288 posted...
sonicnewboy posted...

Yes, I see what you're saying, but not every video game consumer goes into a store with that kind of mindset. Some people actually do compare video games to one another purchase--I for one, research my games before hand to make sure that I am getting the better bang for my buck, and will look at reviews and compare different games.

And didn't the Wii sell pretty well, considering how it didn't have that many games to choose from (at least compared to the Xbox and ps3)?

I mean, Nintendo has been known for making systems that don't get very much 3rd party support, yet they are still pretty successful IMO. They haven't gone under, at least.


Thats not a good comparison:
http://www.vgchartz.com/platforms/

Wii has 2,751 titles
Wii U has 115

Also the wii is Nintendo's best selling console ever, it also has the largest game library of any Nintendo console. You can also see on that list that the most successful console in history (PS2) also had the largest game library of all the consoles.


That's not a good comparison. The Wii U hasn't been out as long as the Wii.