Why does it matter if Nintendo is at a conference or not?

#1Numbuh100Posted 4/29/2014 5:54:27 PM
It is the content that matters and they pulled up better contents than Sony/Microsoft did last year no matter how predictable they are.
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#2HeroC114Posted 4/29/2014 6:07:47 PM
E3 is going to be a relic. Nintendo is definitely in a transition state with the Wii U, demand from consumer for unified account systems, and their company as a whole.

Remember SpaceWorld? They dropped it for E3 only. Now they're dropping E3. I think Nintendo drives the industry, while everyone else follows, and that is my opinion. However time after time, they've shown to be leaders, from standardizing the d-pad, analog stick, rumble, to motion controls and creating the blue print for game design based on creating the game concept first, and building the game around it.

It doesn't matter what Nintendo does, they're not linked to the industry like Sony and Microsoft are, they create the trend. Like Iwata said, they can do whatever they want. Limiting themselves is what is going to kill them and make them bankrupt, not taking risks towards moving the market according to their vision.
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#3Baha05Posted 4/29/2014 6:09:25 PM
It doesn't as long as they give an hour or longer Direct and if it's a good one or not
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"DLC has always and still means all downloaded content, but of course Nintendo fanboys always did and will bend logic to suit their ignorance."
#4RedCubixPosted 4/29/2014 6:48:04 PM
Having a PC is critical. I mentioned this before, but whether people like to admit it or not, not having a PC is widely viewed as a concession of defeat. It says to people, "we don't have enough to compete so we're not going to". It's bad PR. Getting on stage is a show of confidence, of ability, of ambition.

But, given Iwata's timidness towards everything around him, it does not surprise me that he chickened out. The guy's a doormat.

@HeroC114: Of course Nintendo's linked to the industry, and it very much does matter what they do. Where Nintendo finds itself currently is largely because it chooses to ignore everything around it. Nintendo can claim "they don't care" and march to their own tune, thinking of themselves as their own special little flower, but the truth is, consumers very much do care. That's what matters.

Any company's success lay contingent upon the consumer. To dismiss and ignore the desire of that base is a perilous and downright arrogant strategy, and we're seeing where it's gotten Nintendo.