Genyo Takeda on the development of the Wii U

#1iKhanicPosted 7/3/2014 10:02:43 AM
http://nintendoeverything.com/nintendos-takeda-challenging-aspect-designing-wii-u/#more-165598

If you ask me about the most challenging aspect of designing Wii U, it was that the high-resolution graphics were anticipated by everyone and could not be an advantage. In addition, we are still having a hard time to make the best use of its new controller, the “Wii U GamePad.” On the other hand, it was a natural and inherent decision to aim for hardware efficiency, including a not huge capacity but low-latency memory, in designing Wii U, as we have done since the days of Nintendo GameCube. These sorts of things have been ubiquitous across the entire company; it is in our DNA. We want to pass on to our younger developers the DNA of offering unexpected and fun entertainment to consumers by doing things in different ways from others so the company can continuously produce unprecedented entertainment. This DNA should materialize in various forms. Sometimes it could be in the form of hardware, and at other times, it could bear fruit in other technology. Anyway, I want to ensure that this DNA is passed on throughout the company.

I think this either confirms or strongly suggests that Nintendo didn't initially design/include the Gamepad with Gameplay ideas in mind. Usually Nintendo builds the hardware around the software they want to produce, but I guess they tried something different this time

Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.
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"Well, they sure don't make evil immortal sorcerers like they used to." - Klarion the Witch Boy
#2TerotrousPosted 7/3/2014 10:08:13 AM
iKhanic posted...
Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.

It does result in more reliable hardware and thus less money spent on warranties, though. Microsoft's XBox 360 was quite successful, but for the first few years they were still running a huge deficit just from all the repairs they had to do.


I think it'll be fairly trivial in the future as eventually we'll hit the cap where more hardware power ceases to be useful, at which point it might as well just be smaller and more efficient. The more pressing issue is indeed that they don't seem to have been able to utilize the gamepad nearly as effectively as the Wiimote. I think Off-TV play is the real strength of the gamepad, and it doesn't seem like they really recognized that at first.
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#3arvilinoPosted 7/3/2014 10:14:27 AM(edited)
iKhanic posted...
http://nintendoeverything.com/nintendos-takeda-challenging-aspect-designing-wii-u/#more-165598

If you ask me about the most challenging aspect of designing Wii U, it was that the high-resolution graphics were anticipated by everyone and could not be an advantage. In addition, we are still having a hard time to make the best use of its new controller, the “Wii U GamePad.” On the other hand, it was a natural and inherent decision to aim for hardware efficiency, including a not huge capacity but low-latency memory, in designing Wii U, as we have done since the days of Nintendo GameCube. These sorts of things have been ubiquitous across the entire company; it is in our DNA. We want to pass on to our younger developers the DNA of offering unexpected and fun entertainment to consumers by doing things in different ways from others so the company can continuously produce unprecedented entertainment. This DNA should materialize in various forms. Sometimes it could be in the form of hardware, and at other times, it could bear fruit in other technology. Anyway, I want to ensure that this DNA is passed on throughout the company.

I think this either confirms or strongly suggests that Nintendo didn't initially design/include the Gamepad with Gameplay ideas in mind. Usually Nintendo builds the hardware around the software they want to produce, but I guess they tried something different this time

Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.


But you will consider it when it comes to handheld devices. The next Nintendo handheld is going to "absorb the WiiU architecture" for the shared Nintendo OS, they need really efficient hardware for the next handheld to have a good battery life(Without driving up the cost with expensive high capacity batteries).
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'The fact of the matter is that we've been here constantly. We've been betraying peoples expectations, in a good way, for a long time.'
3DS: 2449-4649-4995
#4iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 7/3/2014 10:16:38 AM
Terotrous posted...
iKhanic posted...
Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.

It does result in more reliable hardware and thus less money spent on warranties, though. Microsoft's XBox 360 was quite successful, but for the first few years they were still running a huge deficit just from all the repairs they had to do.


I think it'll be fairly trivial in the future as eventually we'll hit the cap where more hardware power ceases to be useful, at which point it might as well just be smaller and more efficient. The more pressing issue is indeed that they don't seem to have been able to utilize the gamepad nearly as effectively as the Wiimote. I think Off-TV play is the real strength of the gamepad, and it doesn't seem like they really recognized that at first.


I'd argue the opposite. I think the Gamepad was initially included mostly for Off-TV play. And while Off-TV Play might be a strength, it's not a strength that necessitates bundling it with the system.

I said this in an earlier post, but last week on NVC, they talked about this. Colin Moriarty (who I tend to disagree vehemently with) made the point that with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed. And I agree with that. I bought the Wii at launch, and the DS only a few months after launch, mainly because I saw a lot of potential in both ideas. I really haven't been all that interested in the Wii U until this past E3, and it was because of awesome software, not the hardware.
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"Well, they sure don't make evil immortal sorcerers like they used to." - Klarion the Witch Boy
#5BlackPhoenix127Posted 7/3/2014 10:26:23 AM
iKhanic posted...
Terotrous posted...
iKhanic posted...
Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.

It does result in more reliable hardware and thus less money spent on warranties, though. Microsoft's XBox 360 was quite successful, but for the first few years they were still running a huge deficit just from all the repairs they had to do.


I think it'll be fairly trivial in the future as eventually we'll hit the cap where more hardware power ceases to be useful, at which point it might as well just be smaller and more efficient. The more pressing issue is indeed that they don't seem to have been able to utilize the gamepad nearly as effectively as the Wiimote. I think Off-TV play is the real strength of the gamepad, and it doesn't seem like they really recognized that at first.


I'd argue the opposite. I think the Gamepad was initially included mostly for Off-TV play. And while Off-TV Play might be a strength, it's not a strength that necessitates bundling it with the system.

I said this in an earlier post, but last week on NVC, they talked about this. Colin Moriarty (who I tend to disagree vehemently with) made the point that with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed. And I agree with that. I bought the Wii at launch, and the DS only a few months after launch, mainly because I saw a lot of potential in both ideas. I really haven't been all that interested in the Wii U until this past E3, and it was because of awesome software, not the hardware.


Hindsight is 20/20. Everyone thought the DS and Wii were going to flop before they were released. He's blowing smoke.
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PSN: Azure-Edge
#6iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 7/3/2014 10:36:31 AM
BlackPhoenix127 posted...
iKhanic posted...
Terotrous posted...
iKhanic posted...
Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.

It does result in more reliable hardware and thus less money spent on warranties, though. Microsoft's XBox 360 was quite successful, but for the first few years they were still running a huge deficit just from all the repairs they had to do.


I think it'll be fairly trivial in the future as eventually we'll hit the cap where more hardware power ceases to be useful, at which point it might as well just be smaller and more efficient. The more pressing issue is indeed that they don't seem to have been able to utilize the gamepad nearly as effectively as the Wiimote. I think Off-TV play is the real strength of the gamepad, and it doesn't seem like they really recognized that at first.


I'd argue the opposite. I think the Gamepad was initially included mostly for Off-TV play. And while Off-TV Play might be a strength, it's not a strength that necessitates bundling it with the system.

I said this in an earlier post, but last week on NVC, they talked about this. Colin Moriarty (who I tend to disagree vehemently with) made the point that with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed. And I agree with that. I bought the Wii at launch, and the DS only a few months after launch, mainly because I saw a lot of potential in both ideas. I really haven't been all that interested in the Wii U until this past E3, and it was because of awesome software, not the hardware.


Hindsight is 20/20. Everyone thought the DS and Wii were going to flop before they were released. He's blowing smoke.


What are you talking about? The initial reception to the Wii was overwhelmingly positive. How do you think the Wii flew off the shelves initially in the first place? Casuals aren't going to line up on launch day or pre-order the system. The Wii had massive hype from gamers going in. Not sure about the DS though.

And I don't think I have to tell you how Apple's stock took off with the iPhone.
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"Well, they sure don't make evil immortal sorcerers like they used to." - Klarion the Witch Boy
#7TerotrousPosted 7/3/2014 10:39:50 AM
iKhanic posted...
I'd argue the opposite. I think the Gamepad was initially included mostly for Off-TV play. And while Off-TV Play might be a strength, it's not a strength that necessitates bundling it with the system.

I'm not convinced, they didn't push Off-TV play at all in their marketting. Also, if Off-TV play was the main reason for the gamepad, why is the range so short and the battery life so bad? It would have been worth dumping accelerometers and other such rarely-used junk in the gamepad to increase the battery life and range.


I said this in an earlier post, but last week on NVC, they talked about this. Colin Moriarty (who I tend to disagree vehemently with) made the point that with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed.

This is totally untrue for DS, everyone thought the second screen and touch-screen were gimmicks and no one had any idea what to do with them. The only system that might be a counterexample is the Wii, but even then devs were super skeptical, so they didn't have much software lined up past launch, resulting in that drought in 2007.
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http://www.backloggery.com/tero - My backloggery
http://whatliesbeyondnovel.blogspot.ca/ - My novel, updates weekly
#8Granadico_Posted 7/3/2014 10:40:18 AM
i'm not sure about the gamepad, but i'm sure Nintendo builds their consoles around being efficient (energy efficient, doesn't break easily, not loud, etc). I'm pretty sure a crap ton of people who bought a 360 also bought a second one cuz their first one crapped out on them. Ours sure did >_>
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Currently playing: Darksiders II (Wii U) and Kid Icarus: Uprising (3DS) NNID:Granadico
#9arvilinoPosted 7/3/2014 11:03:56 AM(edited)
iKhanic posted...
BlackPhoenix127 posted...
iKhanic posted...
Terotrous posted...
iKhanic posted...
Also, maybe it's just me, but I feel like Nintendo making their hardware energy efficient doesn't really contribute to sales very much. It might be a nice feature to have, but I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously consider energy consumption in deciding to purchase a console. It just sounds like a waste of the limited resource budget that can go into a console's components.

It does result in more reliable hardware and thus less money spent on warranties, though. Microsoft's XBox 360 was quite successful, but for the first few years they were still running a huge deficit just from all the repairs they had to do.


I think it'll be fairly trivial in the future as eventually we'll hit the cap where more hardware power ceases to be useful, at which point it might as well just be smaller and more efficient. The more pressing issue is indeed that they don't seem to have been able to utilize the gamepad nearly as effectively as the Wiimote. I think Off-TV play is the real strength of the gamepad, and it doesn't seem like they really recognized that at first.


I'd argue the opposite. I think the Gamepad was initially included mostly for Off-TV play. And while Off-TV Play might be a strength, it's not a strength that necessitates bundling it with the system.

I said this in an earlier post, but last week on NVC, they talked about this. Colin Moriarty (who I tend to disagree vehemently with) made the point that with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed. And I agree with that. I bought the Wii at launch, and the DS only a few months after launch, mainly because I saw a lot of potential in both ideas. I really haven't been all that interested in the Wii U until this past E3, and it was because of awesome software, not the hardware.


Hindsight is 20/20. Everyone thought the DS and Wii were going to flop before they were released. He's blowing smoke.


What are you talking about? The initial reception to the Wii was overwhelmingly positive. How do you think the Wii flew off the shelves initially in the first place? Casuals aren't going to line up on launch day or pre-order the system. The Wii had massive hype from gamers going in. Not sure about the DS though.

And I don't think I have to tell you how Apple's stock took off with the iPhone.


You're wrong about the DS its sales were slow until the touch generations software(NIntendogs) and then later DSlite iteration. If you want an comparison, if you aligned the sale of the DS and 3DS, the DS is far ahead in comparison to the 3DS at the same point in the systems life span. However shortly after the 3DS's price drop it was exceeding sales of the DS at the same point in its life by millions even though the 3DS after the price cut was still more expensive than the DS.

The DS showed its potential after it was on the market for more than a year and actually 2 years for the DSLite which made the system extremely popular in the mainstream.To say its potential was immediately recognized would be a lie or trying to re-write history.
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'The fact of the matter is that we've been here constantly. We've been betraying peoples expectations, in a good way, for a long time.'
3DS: 2449-4649-4995
#10iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 7/3/2014 10:57:24 AM
Terotrous posted...
iKhanic posted...
I'd argue the opposite. I think the Gamepad was initially included mostly for Off-TV play. And while Off-TV Play might be a strength, it's not a strength that necessitates bundling it with the system.

I'm not convinced, they didn't push Off-TV play at all in their marketting. Also, if Off-TV play was the main reason for the gamepad, why is the range so short and the battery life so bad? It would have been worth dumping accelerometers and other such rarely-used junk in the gamepad to increase the battery life and range.


I said this in an earlier post, but last week on NVC, they talked about this. Colin Moriarty (who I tend to disagree vehemently with) made the point that with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed.

This is totally untrue for DS, everyone thought the second screen and touch-screen were gimmicks and no one had any idea what to do with them. The only system that might be a counterexample is the Wii, but even then devs were super skeptical, so they didn't have much software lined up past launch, resulting in that drought in 2007.


-I'd say that it's not in the marketing mostly because it's much more flashy to show HD gameplay on the TV than it is to show someone playing a console game a few feet away on the gamepad. When the Wii U was revealed all the way up to today, Off-TV Play is something Nintendo consistently stresses. The Accelerometers and Gyroscopes are pretty much a must if you intend on having people play your games with an on-screen controller. But I suppose that's still gameplay.

Hmm, it's so odd, We can't even pinpoint what the Gamepad was originally intended for. I guess that's part of what we all mean when we say the system lacked focus.

For the DS, I'm not sure who "everyone" is. I thought the idea was brilliant from the second I heard about it. And I clearly wasn't the only one, as several people I knew had a DS in it's early days as well. But my personal experience really isn't all that reliable. The DS actually sold 16M units before the DS Lite came out though. That's a little less than a year and a half. So there was clearly some excitement surrounding the system.
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"Well, they sure don't make evil immortal sorcerers like they used to." - Klarion the Witch Boy