Genyo Takeda on the development of the Wii U

#11WraithX_959Posted 7/3/2014 10:58:49 AM
Nintendo is a Japanese video games company that makes games and hardware for mainly the Japanese market, which is their main problem.
#12TerotrousPosted 7/3/2014 11:03:39 AM
iKhanic posted...
When the Wii U was revealed all the way up to today, Off-TV Play is something Nintendo consistently stresses.

Not really. When the system was first revealed, they gave it a little focus, and they give it some now, but for about a year after it came out there was almost no focus on the Off-TV play, instead it was virtually all on asymmetric multiplayer (consider the system's flagship game, Nintendoland, which doesn't support Off-TV play at all), which really just didn't have too much of an impact.
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#13EoinPosted 7/3/2014 11:11:27 AM
Terotrous posted...
It does result in more reliable hardware and thus less money spent on warranties, though. Microsoft's XBox 360 was quite successful, but for the first few years they were still running a huge deficit just from all the repairs they had to do.

The 360's not the best example to use here. The bulk of its hardware issues were only indirectly related to energy efficiency. The 360 came out just as the use of lead in solders was banned in many places, leading to substitute solders that weren't really good enough and failed when routinely subjected to changing temperatures. Later models of the PS3 and Xbox 360 were much more reliable, and the PS4 and Xbox One should be reliable also, unless some very strange mistake (unrelated to energy efficiency) has been made.

The Wii U is going to end up being extremely reliable as well, but chances are there won't be large numbers of any console breaking down within warranty this generation.

iKhanic posted...
with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed.

This is extremely revisionist. The DS was something most people had to play to appreciate and the Wii was widely ridiculed (again, until people started playing it).

Terotrous posted...
Also, if Off-TV play was the main reason for the gamepad, why is the range so short and the battery life so bad?

While I agree with you that off-TV play probably wasn't the major reason behind the GamePad...these points have fairly easy explanations. The range of the GamePad (and any wireless connection) is inverse to bandwidth - any way to extend the range lowers the bandwidth (and vice versa). I think Nintendo mostly got that call right. The battery...well, the GamePad is blatantly designed to comfortably hold a bigger battery than the one that comes with it: http://wiiudaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Wii-U-GamePad-Battery.jpg - I think it's fairly obvious that Nintendo just wanted to be able to sell a proprietary battery at a huge margin (which unsurprisingly is exactly what they're doing).

I think the bigger indicators that off-TV play wasn't the main reason for the GamePad are things like the fact that it's touchscreen (not necessary for off-TV play), that it's not a universal feature, and that (as you say) the marketing didn't really try to push that as a selling point.
#14arvilinoPosted 7/3/2014 11:31:17 AM(edited)
iKhanic posted...

For the DS, I'm not sure who "everyone" is. I thought the idea was brilliant from the second I heard about it. And I clearly wasn't the only one, as several people I knew had a DS in it's early days as well. But my personal experience really isn't all that reliable. The DS actually sold 16M units before the DS Lite came out though. That's a little less than a year and a half. So there was clearly some excitement surrounding the system.


While this graph chart probably isn't entirely accurate:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v103/Trunkswd/3DSvsDSndashVGChartzGapChartsndashMay2014Update_zps26afc954.png

The DS was selling in-line with something that was twice the price which after a price cut exceeded DS sales by 5 million. A lot of that 16 million came from Super Mario 64DS(early 2005) Nintendogs(released in the middle of 2005), Mario Kart DS(late 2005). It wasn't the immediate concept of the DS that was selling it, it was the software.

The potential of the DS was recognized and the system became a runaway success 2 years after it was first released(shown by on the graph where it's just about to massively pull ahead of the 3DS, Nintendo's slowest selling handheld).

The Nintendo DS actually stands as an example that the system doesn't have to have shown its potential before release for it to convince tens of millions of people of its value and that it's worth buying down the line.
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#15iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 7/3/2014 12:05:04 PM
Eoin posted...
iKhanic posted...
with the DS, iPhone, and Wii, we saw the potential as soon as it was revealed.

This is extremely revisionist. The DS was something most people had to play to appreciate and the Wii was widely ridiculed (again, until people started playing it).


Based on what? Admittedly, I don't have the strongest basis either, being mostly personal experience, and what I read about the Wii back in my early teens. But I don't see anything suggesting otherwise either. The initial hype surround this system was very high, hence large lines and strong launch sales (I personally remember arriving at Best Buy at the break of dawn to get a Wii with my dad). It wasn't casuals buying at launch, it was excited gamers. And the idea of motion controls had been something that had always excited people in the past, so something that actually seemed to work (unlike the Power Glove, and something that was tied to the system (unlike the Eye Toy) made people very optimistic about the system.

arvilino has a good point about the DS. But as we have seen with the Wii U, software alone can't push a system that far. It's purely theoretical, but I'd guess that part of what sold the system was potential for what could come. The idea of Dual Screens + Touch Screens hadn't really been done to that extent before, so it was certainly a novel idea.

And why are people ignoring the iPhone. Like it or not, it had a major impact on gaming, and I'd say the type of game ideas that were possible were evident from the device's reveal.
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#16EoinPosted 7/3/2014 12:19:44 PM
iKhanic posted...
Based on what?

Based on I remember it because it wasn't that long ago.

iKhanic posted...
The initial hype surround this system was very high, hence large lines and strong launch sales

You appear to have confused yourself. The original point that you were attempting to make was not about the launch. It was about the reveal. The system was revealed in many parts, but the key reveal was the controller in September 2005, and you can easily find many, many articles and comments and forum topics discussing it, and there's at least as much bemusement and scepticism as there is enthusiasm (and a lot of the enthusiasm is from Nintendo fans giving it the benefit of the doubt because it had "Nintendo" written on it).

The things you're talking about - the hype, the lines, the sell-outs - these all came more than a year later, after Nintendo took the Wii to every industry event they could and put demos of it everywhere they could, to make sure that people could play it, because that was what made them want it, not the reveal. (And that, in itself, was a trick that they learned from the DS, where they did the same thing, for the same reason).

iKhanic posted...
And why are people ignoring the iPhone.

It's unclear why you think that part is relevant. Your point was that the potential of the DS, Wii and iPhone was obvious at the reveal of each device. You're wrong on two out of three counts. I'm unsure why you believe it helps you much if you're right about the third one.
#17iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 7/3/2014 12:23:55 PM
Eoin posted...
iKhanic posted...
Based on what?

Based on I remember it because it wasn't that long ago.

iKhanic posted...
The initial hype surround this system was very high, hence large lines and strong launch sales

You appear to have confused yourself. The original point that you were attempting to make was not about the launch. It was about the reveal. The system was revealed in many parts, but the key reveal was the controller in September 2005, and you can easily find many, many articles and comments and forum topics discussing it, and there's at least as much bemusement and scepticism as there is enthusiasm (and a lot of the enthusiasm is from Nintendo fans giving it the benefit of the doubt because it had "Nintendo" written on it).

The things you're talking about - the hype, the lines, the sell-outs - these all came more than a year later, after Nintendo took the Wii to every industry event they could and put demos of it everywhere they could, to make sure that people could play it, because that was what made them want it, not the reveal. (And that, in itself, was a trick that they learned from the DS, where they did the same thing, for the same reason).

iKhanic posted...
And why are people ignoring the iPhone.

It's unclear why you think that part is relevant. Your point was that the potential of the DS, Wii and iPhone was obvious at the reveal of each device. You're wrong on two out of three counts. I'm unsure why you believe it helps you much if you're right about the third one.


I'm not sure what Colin from IGN meant, but by "reveal" I more mean everything prior to launch, not just the reveal itself. If games hadn't been demoed at the iPhone reveal event, I doubt people would have been excited about that component of the iPhone either.

I don't think you can really have much hype or excitement for a technology if you can't see it in action.
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"Well, they sure don't make evil immortal sorcerers like they used to." - Klarion the Witch Boy
#18EoinPosted 7/3/2014 12:47:15 PM
iKhanic posted...
I'm not sure what Colin from IGN meant, but by "reveal" I more mean everything prior to launch, not just the reveal itself.

Presumably he meant "reveal", rather than the definition that you have created on the spot to try to make it match your point.
#19iKhanic(Topic Creator)Posted 7/3/2014 12:51:39 PM
Eoin posted...
iKhanic posted...
I'm not sure what Colin from IGN meant, but by "reveal" I more mean everything prior to launch, not just the reveal itself.

Presumably he meant "reveal", rather than the definition that you have created on the spot to try to make it match your point.


I didn't make up a definition on the spot. That's just what my line of thinking was. Reveal probably was the wrong word.
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"Well, they sure don't make evil immortal sorcerers like they used to." - Klarion the Witch Boy
#20Thundering_TNTPosted 7/3/2014 1:13:46 PM
Eoin posted...
You appear to have confused yourself. The original point that you were attempting to make was not about the launch. It was about the reveal. The system was revealed in many parts, but the key reveal was the controller in September 2005, and you can easily find many, many articles and comments and forum topics discussing it, and there's at least as much bemusement and scepticism as there is enthusiasm (and a lot of the enthusiasm is from Nintendo fans giving it the benefit of the doubt because it had "Nintendo" written on it).
Here's an april fools joke from gamespot 2006 mockingly saying that the wii (or the revolution, as it was known back then) would be ahead of the console race by 2010.
http://www.gamespot.com/articles/april-fools-analyst-revolution-will-take-lead-in-2010/1100-6146958/
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