Rate my idea for Nintendo's next console

#71EoinPosted 7/24/2014 12:44:27 AM(edited)
iKhanic posted...
I mean, isn't it obvious? You can't hold the Vita or Gamepad like a Sword or Bat. You can't use it to simulate punches. But putting a controller in a wand form factor. allows this type of gameplay to happen.

A magnetometer doesn't really add much to the precision of this kind of control.

iKhanic posted...
I have trouble believing that the Wii Remote + has these precise and fast accelerometers and gyroscopes.

The accelerometer is limited, but the gyroscope is close to top end. It can measure up to 2000 degrees per second with a polling rate of 140Hz and its error rates are comparable to the gyroscopes used in the high end of the mobile market. It's better than the one in the iPhone 5, as a point of comparison.

I'm not saying that the Remote Plus is the best on the market or anything. You can definitely make motion controllers that are more precise than it. For example, the PlayStation Move (which has a magnetometer as well). Nobody really cares though. I don't see people asking for more precise sensors in mobile phones, or for a Wii Remote SuperPlus, or a PlayStation Move 2.

iKhanic posted...
Also my knowledge in signal processing isn't great, but wouldn't it be possible to filter basic physiological shake and small involuntary movements?

Sure, it's fairly simple. Once you start doing that though, you're filtering out your precision as well.

iKhanic posted...
I never ran into any immersion issues with the breaking of one-to one in games like Skyward Sword. Like ever. The sound and rumble reaction was violent enough that I felt a close enough physical feedback.

I'd never describe the rumble in a Wii Remote as "violent". It doesn't do anything to prevent a player from breaking 1:1 controls in any number of ways - it's just a minor feedback mechanism.

iKhanic posted...
I don't have an answer to your last point. I'm scratching my head a bit now as to why the DS and 3DS haven't gotten more strategy games.

Both have plenty of strategy games, just not the ones of the type you seem to mean when you say "strategy games" (there's a lot more than just one type). The reason that they're lacking real-time unit-based strategy games is that it's really not as simple as developers being attracted by control schemes. The existence of motion controls won't guarantee that many developers will make motion controlled games. This is especially true if they want to make multiplatform games and the controller also allows for traditional controls.

Imagine doing this controller nowadays. 90%+ of games will be designed to play on PS4 and/or PC - how will they use your controller? I think the answer is "as a traditional controller" - maybe with a minor change or two as a nod to the existence of motion controls.

This is why I think having motion controls there by default isn't a good idea. You think that you're compromising with a controller that allows for motion controls and traditional controls. I think you're adding design flaws to a traditional controller to accommodate a control method that a declining amount of people really want.
#72SabramPosted 7/24/2014 2:20:03 AM
iKhanic posted...
Name: The N7. Keeps it simple, and hammers home the fact that Nintendo has been at this for a while.

Launch Date: November 2018

Power: 25% less powerful than the PS5, But it still sticks with PowerPC architecture. The reason for this is that Nintendo developers are accustomed to that architecture and it allows for BC, which is all too important for the successor to a system with underwhelming sales. 12 GB RAM

Storage: 128 GB SSD

Ports: 6 USB, 1 HDMI (Ethernet Dongle offered*)

Backward Compatibility: Feature Wii Emulation and BC with the Wii U.

Controller: The N7 Remote- Takes the Basic Wii Remote + and Nunchuck concept and adds:
-Dual Analog
-Dual Analog triggers
-Magnetometer
-Newer and higher quality Accelerometer and Gyroscope.

This is the primary controller sold for 60$ in combination. It is marketed as the next level of motion control, bringing accuracy and reducing latency in areas the Wii Remote failed.

Additional controllers are sold as accessories.
Wii U Gamepad: $80
Wii U Pro Controller: $40

Online: Free to play online

Subscription Services: The Nintendo Classics Library. For $15 per month, you gain access to a catalog of NES, SNES, GB, GBC, and GC titles, with unlimited play time. Additionally, you gain access to early demos and a 10% discount off of eShop titles. Uses Streaming.

Instant Nintendo. For $45 per month, have unlimited access to a library of both modern games for the system and the Nintendo Classics Library. Uses Streaming

Virtual Console: Launches in conjunction with the Subscription plan. Offers NES, SNES, Genesis, N64, GBA, DS, GC, and Dreamcast at launch. GC and Dreamcast launch with only 2 titles per system though. Features crossbuy with new Nintendo handheld.

VR: Oculus Rift Support.^

Other: Handheld offers Cross-play.

Notable 1st party Launch titles:
EAD Tokyo developed 3D Mario game
Wii Sports-esque game-Nintendolympics (I know the name is terrible, if you have a better name let me know)
New Battalion Wars game

In Spring of 2019: Splatoon 2

Cost: $399.99 Bundled with Wii Sports-esque game: Nintendolympics

*Here's why. It will be 2018, Ethernet is already dying, it will be close to dead at that point.
^While I'm excited about VR, I don't think it will be affordable enough to center a console around by 2018.


Oh my, so many things very unlikely.
1: 128GB won't be enough storage for games by that point. 500GB isnt even enough NOW
2: 6 USB ports is a bit excessive and would never be used.
3:The two Subscription Services outlined would never happen, especially the second. Very few would pay $45 a MONTH for that
4: Rift Support will be hard pressed to come to any console since Facebook bought them out. Likely to be a PC only peripheral

It's hard to say whether the price is too high or too low, but I'm guessing too high for 12GB RAM and 128GB SSD by 2018. Unless there's some serious new tech in the controllers it wouldnt be worth it.
---
Dark Souls 2 + Dragon's Crown crossover game needs to happen.
PSN: Sabram - NNID: Sabram - Gamertag: Sabram
#73Lefty128kPosted 7/24/2014 2:38:12 AM
random_man9119 posted...
The name might need to be changed... Since N7 is associated with Mass Effect...


It's just Nintendo fanboys stealing others ideas, like how Nintendo stole Philips ideas.
#74LvthnPosted 7/24/2014 2:56:35 AM
elheber posted...
Lvthn posted...
iKhanic posted...
Expect Sony and Microsoft to drop the Ethernet port by 2018 as well. Ethernet is dying. Fewer and fewer devices are using it every day. It's not a matter of being cheap, it's a matter of keeping with the times.


What? Fewer and fewer devices like what, tablets? Is that what you're aiming to match? Or is there some new wired technology supplanting ethernet that I've failed to notice (always possible, I hardly know everything)?

I also want to point out, you are supposing a streaming service, over wifi only. And you don't see that being a nightmare? Not to mention, if you're going to shell out for a wireless card that CAN handle that, an ethernet port is going to be drastically cheaper to get the same result.

Needless to say, if the next generation of consoles expects me to game online over wifi, I will be done with consoles entirely with no regrets. Any industry that actively goes backwards in functionality deserves to die.


Sorry, dude, ethernet on consoles is going the way of the dodo. The difference in latency between wired and wireless is marginal, and nowhere near the lag inherent in cloud gaming, or even just the display lag on TVs.

Insisting on ethernet is like insisting on wired controllers.


Yes, I'm sure a console that has gotten a cold reception and been lambasted for its hardware decisions will be the trendsetter for future gaming connectivity.

Every other non-mobile gaming platform out right now has ethernet, and the vast majority of online gamers use ethernet, whether for optimization or because it's plug and play rather than setting up a network. I'm sorry to say, but even in Nintendo's prime I'm pretty sure they were not setting the trend for cable usage in the electronics world.

Wii U uses a wired controller. So does PS4, and PS3, though all of them have wireless modes available as well. It WOULD be a major loss of functionality to completely remove the option to wire the controller, even aside from recharging there are a number of reasons to wire the controller, even if temporarily.

Wired peripherals remain the standard for professional or gaming use on PC. When cable management isn't at issue, there are zero reasons to favor wireless and many reasons to want to avoid it.
#75KungFuPhilPosted 7/24/2014 4:06:29 AM
I didn't really read the topic.

The only reason why I'm posting is to say how ridiculous 6USB ports are. Unless this new console is meant to replace a PC, 2-4 USB ports are all that is needed. I have a HDD on my PS3 which has only two USB ports and only rarely does a situation come up where I would like an additional USB port.
---
PSN: Moar_Shtick
#76SabramPosted 7/24/2014 4:27:59 AM
I have six USB ports even on my PC, yet i've never used more than 4 at a time. Mouse, Keyboard, Headset, and Controller are all i've plugged in at once. Sometimes I might need to use my card reader, but when I do that I highly doubt i'm using my controller or headset at the same time.
---
Dark Souls 2 + Dragon's Crown crossover game needs to happen.
PSN: Sabram - NNID: Sabram - Gamertag: Sabram
#77GeminiX7Posted 7/26/2014 4:48:26 PM(edited)
Ethernet is nowhere close to dead. It's going to be the mainstay of most households and businesses for quite awhile, and there are entire generations of it(6a namely) that haven't even made it to the consumer mass and will give better speeds than most 802.11 and have alot of security that you miss by going wireless.

Also, the SSD is too small. By 2018 if they can't get a cheap 500GB SSD they'll probably forgo it entirely and go with the standard. The drive needs to be large enough to store saves and its way too easy to breach the security of a system if you are reliant on external drives. And before you bring up proprietary External drives, just ask Sony how much people love proprietary storage.
---
NNID/PSN/GT: GeminiX7
FC: 0748-3100-6541 [FS: Tangelia, Ivysaur, and Maractus]
#78Warmonger222Posted 7/26/2014 6:38:14 PM
iKhanic posted...
Name: The N7. Keeps it simple, and hammers home the fact that Nintendo has been at this for a while.


NO

Launch Date: November 2018

Power: 25% less powerful than the PS5, But it still sticks with PowerPC architecture. The reason for this is that Nintendo developers are accustomed to that architecture and it allows for BC, which is all too important for the successor to a system with underwhelming sales. 12 GB RAM

Ports: 6 USB, 1 HDMI (Ethernet Dongle offered*)

Backward Compatibility: Feature Wii Emulation and BC with the Wii U.


Excellent release time.

I'd say that Nintendo should try to match their competitors on power as closely as possible next gen, because I think the developers will be even more ridiculous about it by then. i agree with the ports and BC though.

Storage: 128 GB SSD


Eh, thats acceptable, but I'd go with 320GB, or maybe even 500 will be cheap enough by then.

Controller: The N7 Remote- Takes the Basic Wii Remote + and Nunchuck concept and adds:
-Dual Analog
-Dual Analog triggers
-Magnetometer
-Newer and higher quality Accelerometer and Gyroscope.

This is the primary controller sold for 60$ in combination. It is marketed as the next level of motion control, bringing accuracy and reducing latency in areas the Wii Remote failed.

Additional controllers are sold as accessories.
Wii U Gamepad: $80
Wii U Pro Controller: $40

Notable 1st party Launch titles:
EAD Tokyo developed 3D Mario game
Wii Sports-esque game-Nintendolympics (I know the name is terrible, if you have a better name let me know)
New Battalion Wars game


No. Regular controller, maybe adapted to be a little more motion control friendly, but don't base it on the Wiimote. Base it more on the GC or Pro controller. Motion control is already almost dead anyway

Subscription Services: The Nintendo Classics Library. For $15 per month, you gain access to a catalog of NES, SNES, GB, GBC, and GC titles, with unlimited play time. Additionally, you gain access to early demos and a 10% discount off of eShop titles. Uses Streaming.

Instant Nintendo. For $45 per month, have unlimited access to a library of both modern games for the system and the Nintendo Classics Library. Uses Streaming

Virtual Console: Launches in conjunction with the Subscription plan. Offers NES, SNES, Genesis, N64, GBA, DS, GC, and Dreamcast at launch. GC and Dreamcast launch with only 2 titles per system though. Features crossbuy with new Nintendo handheld.

VR: Oculus Rift Support.^


Heres where your idea falls apart. First, the subscription service. I can kinda see this idea, but I don't like it because you don't own the games. I suppose the option wouldn't hurt, but it worries me that if nintendo added a subscription service it would eventually be forced, like PS+ is on the PS4. I still think it's a stupid concept to pay to get discounts and demos.

The second subscription service baffles me even more. It's just...why? It's way too expensive. Even with unlimited access to games you don't actually own them.

Cross buy is something I fully support though. I agree with that.

I think VR will be dead soon too. I think it'll die within a year of the release of the Oculus Rift. Nobody wants to wear a helmet while playing a game, no matter the novelty it brings.
---
"Will ninty go bankrupt?" "Only if Iwata starts using Nintendo's money to spell out a flaming Please Understand on an airstrip." Mike_oxfirm