why do you think the wii u doesn't get as much 3rd party support?

#11NintendoFan81Posted 8/14/2014 1:02:56 AM
All of the above. Third party support has been a struggle since the Wii. Since Nintendo didnt do a regular controller for a 2nd console in a row, it makes more companies shy away still. It's unfortunate but such is life. As for sales: with very few exceptions, games on Wii and Wii U that sold well were Nintendo made games: Mario, Zelda, etc. Gamers do buy Nintendo consoles for the well known franchises and not much else. Then the select few come online to whine about how there is "nothing" out, even if they own many many games. Most of the time when a third party game does come out and its decent: it gets ignored on Wii U because other versions are superior. So unless its an exclusive third party game (like the several RPGs late in Wii lifespan), the game will likely flop badly.

It's the attitude of newer gamers to never be satisfied long apparently. Consumerism is to blame too. It must be new and shiny, must hold the attention span of the constant growing 100000 things to do on computers/phones/tablets/etc age. It's a bit sad if you look at the big picture of things.
#12iKhanicPosted 8/14/2014 1:18:17 AM
NintendoFan81 posted...
All of the above. Third party support has been a struggle since the Wii. Since Nintendo didnt do a regular controller for a 2nd console in a row, it makes more companies shy away still. It's unfortunate but such is life. As for sales: with very few exceptions, games on Wii and Wii U that sold well were Nintendo made games: Mario, Zelda, etc. Gamers do buy Nintendo consoles for the well known franchises and not much else. Then the select few come online to whine about how there is "nothing" out, even if they own many many games. Most of the time when a third party game does come out and its decent: it gets ignored on Wii U because other versions are superior. So unless its an exclusive third party game (like the several RPGs late in Wii lifespan), the game will likely flop badly.

It's the attitude of newer gamers to never be satisfied long apparently. Consumerism is to blame too. It must be new and shiny, must hold the attention span of the constant growing 100000 things to do on computers/phones/tablets/etc age. It's a bit sad if you look at the big picture of things.


So much revisionist history. 3rd party support stated to decline with the SNES, and really took a nosedive with the N64. The Wii and GC actually picked up in 3rd party support.

The sales 3rd parties care about are those from the exclusive base. Whether a customer buys a game on Wii U 360 or PS4 doesn't matter. They still get the money. And because of the 3rd party issue, Nintendo's exclusive base is mostly kids.
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#13CubeTVPosted 8/14/2014 1:47:36 AM
iKhanic posted...

So much revisionist history. 3rd party support stated to decline with the SNES, and really took a nosedive with the N64. The Wii and GC actually picked up in 3rd party support.


This. I could name at least 80 third party games on the GCN that I legitimately like. Maybe about 40 on the N64. But with the Wii U, not counting indies, I can only name about 20.
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#14nonexistingheroPosted 8/14/2014 2:00:26 AM
Baha05 posted...
Sales


Couldn't be more wrong. If sales was biggest deciding factor, the Wii's 3rd party support would've been much stronger. And the developers wouldn't have taken a "wait and see" attitude with the Wii U, since the Wii was very successful. And the Wii U's launch was strong as well with over 3 million sales before the year ended.
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#15NemerlightPosted 8/14/2014 2:10:13 AM
Because Nintendo fans dont buy non Nintendo games on Nintendo systems. Watch Dogs might be the last good 3rd party game on this system....
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#16nonexistingheroPosted 8/14/2014 2:15:27 AM
Watch Dogs isn't even good though and Bayonetta 2, while published & funded by Nintendo, is developed by a 3rd party and infinitely better than Watch Dogs.
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Read the mania: http://www.fanfiction.net/~nonexistinghero
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#17NemerlightPosted 8/14/2014 2:20:20 AM
I do hope Bayonetta 2 turns out great but game is overhyped just because its Wii U exclusive.
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Miami Heat not champions of 2014.
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#18EoinPosted 8/14/2014 2:39:04 AM
It's a combination of many things, centring on sales.

Third party support comes down to a relatively simple balancing act. On one side, you have the expected sales for the game. On the other side, there is the cost to port (or to make the game from scratch, for exclusives).

If the return from the sales is lower than the costs, the game/port won't get made.

If the return from the sales is equal to or slightly higher than the costs, the game/port still won't get made, because there will be other potential options that are likely to produce better returns.

If the return is significantly higher, then the game/port will happen.

Expectations get adjusted based on the console's sales, the sales of other similar games on the platform, the sales of other games from the publisher on the platform, and (if available) the sales of other games from the same series on the platform.

Costs depend in some part on architecture, whether an existing codebase/engine is available for the platform, what kind of support the platform holder will provide, and (for ports) what kind of port is needed - basic ports cost less.

With the Wii U, early on, there was quite a lot of third party support. Not as much as the Xbox 360 and PS3 at their peak, but more than many consoles at launch (including the PS4 and Xbox One) - and more than people appear to remember. Third parties expected (or at least hoped) that their games would do well. They didn't expect them to do well enough to justify more than basic ports (in most cases - there were exceptions), but they thought they'd make money so they supported the Wii U.

Support since then has declined, as third parties have revised their expectations of what kind of sales they'd have, based on their experience with the Wii U (and the experiences of other third parties).

Hardware limitations are an issue, but they are an issue that would be of almost total irrelevance if third parties were enjoying strong sales. The reverse is true as well: if third parties could push a button that created a perfect Wii U version of a game, a lot more games would get released on Wii U even if they didn't sell that well.