Why does the game focus so much on insanity? (Spoilers)

#1ALIEN_WORK2HOPPosted 12/30/2012 5:01:07 AM(edited)
Everyone keeps talking about it and the loading screens made you think Jason is actually going insane and I kinda expected some sort of Shutter Island style ending...but it was straightforward and insanity really didn't play much of a role. I kinda disappointed...

Or did I miss something?
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#2KabtheMentatPosted 12/30/2012 9:17:06 AM(edited)
Well, if you noticed when the chapters were changing it would quote Alice in Wonderland. There's some parallels to both stories.

And it depends on which ending you pick, I guess.

Both Ubisoft's Far Cry games have had literary allusions. FC2 being the Heart of Darkness.
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#3todd_360Posted 12/30/2012 3:33:20 PM
I actually kinda agree with you TC. I was expecting Jason to be a bit more nutty by game's end. He started living the fantasy life and enjoying it sure but he didn't completely lose himself like I was expecting.

One of the things I was hoping to see was a really brutal side of Jason when he finally got his hands on Vaas. With Vaas constantly making references to the definition of insanity I was expecting Jason to have him at his mercy and just mock him about being insane by his own definition, (Doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result, which is exactly what is happening with Vaas repeatedly trying and failing to kill Jason) all the while beating the living crap out of him. Killing Vaas should have been his breaking point but all he does is trip out and stab him 3 times in silence and then is just like "Ok let's go kill Hoyt nao."
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#4GoldenSWarriorsPosted 12/30/2012 4:04:39 PM
Well at the very end you get to choose whether you maintain your sanity and save your friends like you were planning to do the whole time, or if you really have gone insane and you kill your friends to stay on the island.
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#5KabtheMentatPosted 12/31/2012 2:18:01 AM
I think a lot of the insanity talk is a misdirection. They seem to be implying that it's Vaas and/or Jason that are the insane ones. IMO it's Citra that's truly insane.

If you remember when you're fighting Vaas, he says something like "We're all ****ed now." when you kill him. I think he knew she was going to turn Jason into the warrior and that it was Vaas that was originally suppose to be something like that, but broke away from Citra because he knew she was truly crazy.
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Big Money. Big Women. Big Fun.
I don't have a cocaine habit, I just like the way it smells.
#6AsbesdosMothPosted 12/31/2012 7:34:39 AM
A few scripted drug trips, scripted dream sequences and weak literary allusions, quoting a great work doesn't put you on its level.

There was the occasional good moment, like when we see how overjoyed Jason is made by committing horrific acts of violence, that's pretty good, anyone who gets giddy over massacring people with a flamethrower isn't well.

One problem is that the line between reality and madness is so clearly defined, it's very obvious that you're entering a crazy sequence, mostly due to loading screens and big white flashes that indicate transitions. And the trips into madness are always so elaborate and so clearly Jason going insane that it's really nothing more than an interesting spook-house ride.

A game that does madness well doesn't point out so clearly that the character is going mad, it's just that weird stuff happens, small things you may not even notice, weird little abnormalities that confuse you and get in your head.

If you want to get in the player's head, you've got to get in undetected.
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#7casedawgzPosted 12/31/2012 7:39:11 AM
^this. As it does with just about every game narrative, Spec Ops: The Line makes this game's narrative look like bush league. Without going into spoilers, SOTL not only makes you question events, but also the characters, yourself, your enjoyment of the game, and even your love of gaming in general.
#8AsbesdosMothPosted 12/31/2012 7:49:24 AM
Spec Ops: The Line is a great example. I played the demo and I tossed it aside, thinking it another generic cover shooter. A friend lends it to me, telling me I'll like it, I don't believe him, but I try to play through it, and it turns out to be a true gem in terms of storytelling in video games.
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#9eratas123Posted 12/31/2012 8:09:08 AM
AsbesdosMoth posted...
Spec Ops: The Line is a great example. I played the demo and I tossed it aside, thinking it another generic cover shooter. A friend lends it to me, telling me I'll like it, I don't believe him, but I try to play through it, and it turns out to be a true gem in terms of storytelling in video games.


Agreed. The best part is that there is foreshadowing of what's actually going on, you just have to pay attention and realize the flawed logic some of the scenes portray.
#10cookie518Posted 12/31/2012 10:26:53 AM
eratas123 posted...
AsbesdosMoth posted...
Spec Ops: The Line is a great example. I played the demo and I tossed it aside, thinking it another generic cover shooter. A friend lends it to me, telling me I'll like it, I don't believe him, but I try to play through it, and it turns out to be a true gem in terms of storytelling in video games.


Agreed. The best part is that there is foreshadowing of what's actually going on, you just have to pay attention and realize the flawed logic some of the scenes portray.


Story wise, it's a pretty good game, but I couldn't get over the fact that the gameplay was so generic, that it completely drowned out the insanity by the end. It was just wave after wave of near-infinitely spawning enemies. Sort of like this game's co-op.
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