So what is Bloom?

#1MasterVadingPosted 1/26/2013 11:05:47 PM
Keep hearing this....





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#2fLiNoPosted 1/26/2013 11:07:44 PM
A flourishing, healthy condition; the time or period of greatest beauty, artistry, etc
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#3Jakobs_FodderPosted 1/26/2013 11:43:39 PM
Lmao (at first response).

Bloom is the widening of the reticule when using the dmr as you rapid fire.

...If I recall correctly.
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#4That1GuyyPosted 1/26/2013 11:51:02 PM
Bloom is where your crosshair expands after firing a shot, making subsequent shots less accurate.

Here's a visual example of bloom from Reach.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2dSrJ8D1d8&t=00m40s

Here's the same example without bloom.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2dSrJ8D1d8&t=01m24s

Contrary to what some people think, bloom is not the same as recoil. Recoil in a game is when you shoot and the crosshair itself moves (causing your view to move).

This is recoil.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpUCzBWnEMU
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#5Phoenixmon2Posted 1/27/2013 12:21:19 AM
Also contrary to what some people think, reticle bloom is nothing but a visual device on the HUD to show you that your weapon is losing accuracy. It does not turn whether you get a kill or not into a luck based outcome.

As with any FPS, the weapon's programming determines where your bullet goes. People complain about the DMR because they didn't control its fire - IMO, the weapon was less accurate than it should be...but it has nothing to do with reticle bloom.
#6That1GuyyPosted 1/27/2013 12:41:30 AM
Phoenixmon2 posted...
Also contrary to what some people think, reticle bloom is nothing but a visual device on the HUD to show you that your weapon is losing accuracy. It does not turn whether you get a kill or not into a luck based outcome.

As with any FPS, the weapon's programming determines where your bullet goes. People complain about the DMR because they didn't control its fire - IMO, the weapon was less accurate than it should be...but it has nothing to do with reticle bloom.


It takes 5 shots minimum to kill with the DMR in Reach. You and another player started firing at each other at the same time and at the same rate of fire. Suppose that after firing 4 shots, the reticle has bloomed to the point where the bullet will land at the center of your screen (where the other player's head is) only 20% of the time. Now, you can wait for the reticle to settle to gain 100% accuracy, but if the other player decides not to wait and fires immediately, he has a 20% chance of killing you. 1/5 is a big amount. It is big enough to make people afraid that waiting will get them killed due to the other player making that 1/5 shot, and thus they will not wait, perpetuating the problem that no one ever paces his shot for fear of losing a battle 1/5 times because of it.

Now that no one paces his shot out of fear, we have two players firing at each other with a 20% chance of hitting the other. Thus, the battle has reduced itself to a game of luck. Bloom introduced a factor of randomness into the game that made the game less enjoyable both to play and to watch.

Thanks to Derive for coming up with this explanation in an easy way to understand.
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#7KageNoSenshiPosted 1/27/2013 12:46:03 AM(edited)
LMAO how does it not turn into luck based if whether or not your shot hits becomes completely random?

EDIT: Also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHGItn8JCz0
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#8iRGushPosted 1/27/2013 4:39:22 AM
Phoenixmon2 posted...
Also contrary to what some people think, reticle bloom is nothing but a visual device on the HUD to show you that your weapon is losing accuracy. It does not turn whether you get a kill or not into a luck based outcome.

As with any FPS, the weapon's programming determines where your bullet goes. People complain about the DMR because they didn't control its fire - IMO, the weapon was less accurate than it should be...but it has nothing to do with reticle bloom.


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#9Phoenixmon2Posted 1/27/2013 3:01:33 PM
That1Guyy posted...

It takes 5 shots minimum to kill with the DMR in Reach. You and another player started firing at each other at the same time and at the same rate of fire. Suppose that after firing 4 shots, the reticle has bloomed to the point where the bullet will land at the center of your screen (where the other player's head is) only 20% of the time. Now, you can wait for the reticle to settle to gain 100% accuracy, but if the other player decides not to wait and fires immediately, he has a 20% chance of killing you. 1/5 is a big amount. It is big enough to make people afraid that waiting will get them killed due to the other player making that 1/5 shot, and thus they will not wait, perpetuating the problem that no one ever paces his shot for fear of losing a battle 1/5 times because of it.

Now that no one paces his shot out of fear, we have two players firing at each other with a 20% chance of hitting the other. Thus, the battle has reduced itself to a game of luck. Bloom introduced a factor of randomness into the game that made the game less enjoyable both to play and to watch.

Thanks to Derive for coming up with this explanation in an easy way to understand.


This would probably be a better explanation if you weren't pulling percentages out of your ass. There's no way to know what the chance of a hit is when the reticle is bloomed to a certain point. That's just impossible to know.

It is not any different from the way weapons have worked in tons of other FPSes, including the Halo series. When you are firing your assault rifle full auto at another guy, there is a chance that at the last moment, your bullets will not hit and his will, because of the way the weapon was programmed.

The DMR in Reach became very inaccurate, too quickly. That is the problem in a nutshell.
#10SpiduxxudipSPosted 1/27/2013 3:09:15 PM
From: Phoenixmon2 | Posted: 1/27/2013 3:01:33 PM | #009
This would probably be a better explanation if you weren't pulling percentages out of your ass.



Wouldn't matter if the 20% number was wrong, or if it was %10, 20%, or 90%. His argument is correct.
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