What seperates a "Good Casual" with a "ALG Pro"?

#11yoshiisbackPosted 2/1/2013 6:58:48 AM
HaloODSTD posted...
I'd like to think I'm a decent Casual, I'm always first on my team about 80% of the time throughout Halo 2 - 4 keeping at least a 1.85 K/D throughout and hovering around maybe 60% win rate.

But I can never get over that hump that sets me above the rest of the casuals y'know? I played customs with my friends that play on MLG settings in Reach and got my butt handed to me. Pretty sure I never got a kill. They had complete map control, crazy sniping, etc.


Believe it or not, a lot of it is natural. Status quo came in with victory and fearitself, both have not played h4 and did terrible in the beginning. After playing for just a weekend, made it to losers 4.

Some elements of predictions, awareness, and decision making cannot be taught.

/sweaty answer
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#12HaloODSTD(Topic Creator)Posted 2/1/2013 7:01:34 AM
yoshiisback posted...
Some elements of predictions, awareness, and decision making cannot be taught.

/sweaty answer


So constantly playing customs (while getting my ass kicked) prolly won't do any good huh?
Can't wait for Doubles Pro though.
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GT: Jessica Jung xo
PSN: Rutgers Student
#13SomnambulisticPosted 2/1/2013 7:34:20 AM
From: HaloODSTD | #012
yoshiisback posted...
Some elements of predictions, awareness, and decision making cannot be taught.

/sweaty answer


So constantly playing customs (while getting my ass kicked) prolly won't do any good huh?
Can't wait for Doubles Pro though.


It will still definitely do you some good.

Frequently playing with people who are better than is you pretty much the best way to get better at the game yourself. But there's only so much that process can improve. A degree of it is always going to boil down to natural skill and talent. But the thing is, a lot of people won't know if they have any of that natural skill until they step into the environment and adjust to it a little.
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#14HaloODSTD(Topic Creator)Posted 2/1/2013 7:37:50 AM
ElderPredator12 posted...

Frequently playing with people who are better than is you pretty much the best way to get better at the game yourself. But there's only so much that process can improve. A degree of it is always going to boil down to natural skill and talent. But the thing is, a lot of people won't know if they have any of that natural skill until they step into the environment and adjust to it a little.


Would you say playing and adapting to gametypes without radar will benefit a player that goes back to games with radar (and not the other way around), or it's not very noticeable, or maybe depends on the person's style...?
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GT: Jessica Jung xo
PSN: Rutgers Student
#15yoshiisbackPosted 2/1/2013 7:59:18 AM
HaloODSTD posted...
ElderPredator12 posted...

Frequently playing with people who are better than is you pretty much the best way to get better at the game yourself. But there's only so much that process can improve. A degree of it is always going to boil down to natural skill and talent. But the thing is, a lot of people won't know if they have any of that natural skill until they step into the environment and adjust to it a little.


Would you say playing and adapting to gametypes without radar will benefit a player that goes back to games with radar (and not the other way around), or it's not very noticeable, or maybe depends on the person's style...?


No radar requires a greater sense of awareness, so yes it will help you overall.
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XBL GT: Yoshi eats
#16JuletiderPosted 2/1/2013 8:09:18 AM
I was just being a jerk. Im sorry.
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Skowse
#17yoshiisbackPosted 2/1/2013 8:25:36 AM
However, what is an agl pro? There were the 3 top teams who I felt were pro.

Then the top 8 was separated by teams with great potential, but didn't really play (my team, derskys team, status quo) and tryhard maxed potential teams (winturr and broadsides team, another rival local Wisconsin team).

And 42 teams compared to the average 200+ mlg teams that showed up to events is quite a difference.

Tldr: there is no such thing as a halo pro anymore.
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XBL GT: Yoshi eats
#18Cpt_of_IndustryPosted 2/1/2013 8:28:06 AM
Wait, say that again? You were invited to an event, and you didn't even get to play? What kind of crap is that, did you get reimbursed for travel?
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The Jersey Guy
#19HaloODSTD(Topic Creator)Posted 2/1/2013 8:28:18 AM
yoshiisback posted...
However, what is an agl pro?


no idea, saw the term AGL somewhere in an earlier topic, thought it replaced MLG..
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GT: Jessica Jung xo
PSN: Rutgers Student
#20EiffelPosted 2/1/2013 8:47:02 AM
I don't follow pro gaming so someone will correct me if I'm wrong but I get the impression that out of the millions of people that play "competitive" type games such as Halo, CoD, Starcraft, etc there are only a handful of people who can make a living playing.

E-Sports almost seem similar to other traditional pro sports such as the NHL/NFL/NBA where where millions play but only a tiny percentage ever make it to the pro level with an equally small percentage of them becoming stars.

What separates good casuals from pros is freak of nature level natural talent combined with an almost obsessive level of dedication. The dedication is key as well; you can have talent but if you don't spend 8 hrs/day practicing and another few hours reviewing strategy, etc you likely won't make it. I see parents who think their kid is going to make the NHL because they dominate locally but they are literally better off buying a lottery ticket. I think the same is true of E-Sports as regular sport.

TL/DR - natural talent and obsessive dedication.