Anyone know this guy?

#31Roy_DogsiPosted 2/5/2013 6:44:54 PM
NASA is a good one. Mainly for the sole purpose that the acronym itself has been turned into a word, hence like mentioned above, first sound of first letter. Nnnnasa. A NASA member.

The same would go for any acronym that is commonly used as a word... Now... Why can't I think of any more right now? Lol

Did you read that as laul? :-)
---

*If you argue correctly, you're never wrong.*
#32Roy_DogsiPosted 2/5/2013 6:53:13 PM
And sorry Edarian, I didn't miss it. If I'm posting it means I'm on my phone which means I have to highlight and paste a link into a new window. It's so much easier on a PC. But if I'm home, I'm gaming.

Quite the paradox I guess. Was hoping someone would summarize :-)
---

*If you argue correctly, you're never wrong.*
#33EDarienPosted 2/5/2013 9:33:05 PM
lderivedx posted...
From: EDarien | #029
^ Because you clearly missed it the first time.


But that's wrong. You don't say "I'm an PTSD victim."

It's the first sound the word makes. If it's a vowel sound, you use "an," else "a."


Except it's not wrong, that's already understood since the rule of vowel sound vs consonant would already have to be known for this to even be a question. That's why NASA was used and not something like NRA. It's "a NASA representative" just like it would be "an NRA member" because N is pronounced as "en."

Now, if you're just nitpicking for the sake of, then I'm not shocked on this board, on the other hand I'll give you benefit of the doubt that you're being serious here and I'll explain: When a conversation is happening and some of the rules have already been established to be known, one does not have to clarify them again when explained the more "advanced rule", for lack of better diction on my part here before I go to bed. That said, one does not need to clarify the "vowel sound" portion of the rule since it's already established to be known when the question is asked. Had the person, be they a real or hypothetical person in the link, not known about a difference of "a" vs "an" in relation to vowel and consonant sounds then the question about acronyms would never have come up.

Does this make more sense now as to why it is both correct and ignores clarifying that portion of the rule?

As for being too lazy to copy/past a link be it on a phone or computer, then that's on you, bro. I don't see how posting and having to check back however often in the hopes of someone "summarizing" an already posted link is easier than a simple copy/paste, though. Also, to answer your question: Yes, I did read "laul". When I read "lol" I switch between, with no known reason, 'el oh el' and 'laul' in my head. In the case of reading yours, I did actually read "laul" before reading your question after it.
---
Lali-ho!
#34DoctorWhiskeyPosted 2/6/2013 12:08:40 AM
EDarien posted...
lderivedx posted...
From: EDarien | #029
^ Because you clearly missed it the first time.


But that's wrong. You don't say "I'm an PTSD victim."

It's the first sound the word makes. If it's a vowel sound, you use "an," else "a."


Except it's not wrong, that's already understood since the rule of vowel sound vs consonant would already have to be known for this to even be a question. That's why NASA was used and not something like NRA. It's "a NASA representative" just like it would be "an NRA member" because N is pronounced as "en."

Now, if you're just nitpicking for the sake of, then I'm not shocked on this board, on the other hand I'll give you benefit of the doubt that you're being serious here and I'll explain: When a conversation is happening and some of the rules have already been established to be known, one does not have to clarify them again when explained the more "advanced rule", for lack of better diction on my part here before I go to bed. That said, one does not need to clarify the "vowel sound" portion of the rule since it's already established to be known when the question is asked. Had the person, be they a real or hypothetical person in the link, not known about a difference of "a" vs "an" in relation to vowel and consonant sounds then the question about acronyms would never have come up.

Does this make more sense now as to why it is both correct and ignores clarifying that portion of the rule?

As for being too lazy to copy/past a link be it on a phone or computer, then that's on you, bro. I don't see how posting and having to check back however often in the hopes of someone "summarizing" an already posted link is easier than a simple copy/paste, though. Also, to answer your question: Yes, I did read "laul". When I read "lol" I switch between, with no known reason, 'el oh el' and 'laul' in my head. In the case of reading yours, I did actually read "laul" before reading your question after it.


"Overkill"
#35lderivedxPosted 2/6/2013 5:27:11 AM
From: EDarien | #033
Stuff


You're right. I skimmed the page and misread it.
---
Also, we've already established that your amazing high skill 37 firmly establishes you as bad at Halo. - The Beanster
GT: i derive dx