Visual differences

#11JRPGPosted 7/5/2013 8:23:57 PM
Well I'm probably getting this for the vita and my bro is getting it for the ps3 so I will compare the special effects.


I just hope you can cross save over different regions. It will be NA for the vita and AU for PS3.
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#12bigskaPosted 7/6/2013 7:45:24 PM
Played both versions at E3. So awesome. The Vita version didn't seem as bright (might have just been the booth lighting making bad reflections. And plus you can just turn up the brightness if need be!). Framerate seemed similar enough, though I wish I would've been paying better attention between the two. I'd expect 60 fps for the PS3 version and then the same or lower on Vita. I never really got into a battle big enough to test any asset limits (if any) or try to display huge a chunk of effects.

One thing I did notice is that like Guacamelee, the aspect ratio of the Vita screen doesn't seem to show as much field of view as the PS3 version. Comparatively, Guacamelee's visuals were definitely not as sharp on Vita and the diminished FOV was much more noticeable than Dragon's Crown but I still felt it was there, if not very slightly.

I'm trying to remember as much as I can from the expo floor, but I apologize. Memory is kinda fuzzy on graphics details. The gameplay however...
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#13rkenshin13Posted 7/6/2013 8:10:19 PM
Unless the game automatically lowers the brightness maximum while playing the game like what was done with Muramasa Rebirth. I hope that isn't so though on Dragon's Crown.
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#14SetsueiPosted 7/6/2013 8:40:49 PM
From what I can tell most games I've played on the vita are usually dumbed down graphically from their PS3 counterparts, hell if I know why though. I believe it's only slightly weaker than the 360/ps3 and devs still need the proper time to really optimize games for it, which can vary quite a bit if not enough people are actually making games for the vita.
#15rkenshin13Posted 7/7/2013 3:38:39 AM
Muramasa Rebirth is very well optimized for the Vita, Dragon's Crown shouldn't be any different.
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#16wolf_ravenPosted 7/10/2013 8:10:47 PM(edited)
Seeing it in action:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2o2KZduQyg

It looks identical thus far, 60fps and HD but the resolution is 960x540 but considering I can have the exact same experience single player wise on the go on a lunch break and go home to transfer save to my ps3 is a definite plus.
#17Storm ChamberPosted 7/11/2013 8:18:23 AM
wolf_raven posted...
Seeing it in action:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2o2KZduQyg

It looks identical thus far, 60fps and HD but the resolution is 960x540 but considering I can have the exact same experience single player wise on the go on a lunch break and go home to transfer save to my ps3 is a definite plus.


Looks good. Thanks for this.
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#18Sp8cemanSpiffPosted 7/11/2013 11:52:27 AM
rkenshin13 posted...
Yeah, I don't know why Capcom did that.


Because the Vita - no matter how hard the fans are trying to convince themselves and others otherwise - is probably 10 times less powerful than the PS3.

But if you look at Muramasa Rebirth vs Muramasa The Demon Blade on Wii, the graphics look much smoother in Rebirth.


Well, that's the Wii for ya. Not exactly in the same ballpark as the PS3 in terms of hardware.

If that's any indication, I don't think you have to worry about seeing similar differences in Dragon's Crown between the Vita and PS3 version that you saw between UMvC3 on Vita and PS3/Xbox 360.


I don't think there'll be a massive difference either. The Vita seems pretty adept at handling sprites.
That said, if the PS3 game actually runs at a full 1080p, it might still end up looking significantly better (depending on the quality of your tv of course)
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