Pre-Orders from Best Buy? Potential item to flip in the future?

#1LiquiDZerOPosted 8/10/2013 9:16:51 PM
I was wondering if anyone got their pre-orders from Best Buy. I preordered from both gamestop and bestbuy and oddly enough my gamestop order came in but not my Best Buy pre-order, apparently they're still waiting for it to ship in.

I was having a conversation with my brother about Xenoblade Chronicles and the scarcity of the Dragon's Crown has me wondering if I should get a second copy to try and flip on ebay in the future. Xenoblade is going for about $100+ on ebay, leading Gamestop to scam people by offering "used" (but most likely new) copies of the game for $89.

The only potential problem is that the game is up on the digital store. But I'm sure everyone knows how collectors get for rare goods. What are people's thoughts?
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"I can't begin to count the number of agents whose lives were saved by a cardboard box." -Snake
#2DefiningFactorPosted 8/10/2013 10:07:56 PM
50/50 chance. If a person really wants it, they will download it, but if you got the crazy otaku japanese guy then yeah, hes gonna want the copy. Hard to project potential markets for things. I learned my lesson with assassins creed 3. Bought 3 copies and got everything out of all preorders and special editions including the ubiworkshop exclusive. I still got the encyclopedia, but took awhile plus extra procurement of an arm blade to sell off my last copy of AC3. Made my money back which was nice, but still, went south once or twice in the process

For this game, my bet would be if you can get an art book and anything else for the game on the cheap then yeah, do it if you got the particular dealer such as ebay to go through, but if you are gonna do say craigslist or separate video game site that has less of an audience, I would stray away. It mostly depends on your funds and ability to take the loss. If push comes to shove, you may be able to recoup some of the money with a small time shop selling it to them if it fails expectations else where
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Don't worry about it. It's just a crutch...
#3BurgerTime79Posted 8/10/2013 10:28:28 PM
Gamestop is selling Xenoblade for what they are, because of how high the prices are everywhere else. They can't give someone $10 for the game and sell it for $30-40, because people will just buy them to resell on Ebay at a higher price. They're not trying to scam people, and you're just making up stuff you can't prove by claiming that the copies are new ones that they slapped a used sticker on. For crying out loud, can we get over this Gamestop hate already people?!

If people want the physical copy, then they're going to buy the physical copy. We need to stop treating digital distribution like "OMG! Everyone is doing it! Do it too!". If I can't find Dragon's Crown in the stores, then I'll go online and find it. I'm not paying $50-60 for a digital copy of a game. In fact, I refuse to spend more than $20 on a digital game, maybe even $15 depending on which game it is.
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#4LiquiDZerO(Topic Creator)Posted 8/11/2013 1:48:58 AM
BurgerTime79 posted...
Gamestop is selling Xenoblade for what they are, because of how high the prices are everywhere else. They can't give someone $10 for the game and sell it for $30-40, because people will just buy them to resell on Ebay at a higher price. They're not trying to scam people, and you're just making up stuff you can't prove by claiming that the copies are new ones that they slapped a used sticker on. For crying out loud, can we get over this Gamestop hate already people?!


Which is why I said MOST LIKELY. The problem is that their policy of gutting the games from the original wrapping allows them to bypass traditional notions of new and used. From most people's understanding, a "new" copy means it is still in its original wrapping. However, they consistently sell these opened copies as "new." At the same time, this also allows them to sell unsold copies as "used" because there is no evidence a gutted copy was not used as you stated.

Legally speaking, a retailer is allowed to sell an item for whatever price they want to. This is because the game was originally purchased from the publisher itself, which constitutes the actual first sale of the product. This is why stores are able to have sales and then listing the store price with the "Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price." But no consumer in their right mind would purchase a "new" product above the MSRP. Hence, GS' policy. You would be right in saying this is speculation. But there is clearly a logic to their policy that conveniently allows coverage from liability to any legal challenge.
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"I can't begin to count the number of agents whose lives were saved by a cardboard box." -Snake
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