If they took out the japanese honorifics...

#31perfectchaos83Posted 1/26/2013 11:25:51 PM
That's the point of localization. This isn't Japanese, it's English. Finding a workaround is the point, the script writers are just lazy.

There's a difference between bad localization and design choice. If it were, say, a Final Fantasy game with honorifics, I would say it is lazy localization. In this game you essentially live the life of a Japanese High School Student with part of the story heavily based upon your relationship with others. Look at Kanji for example, he looks all tough and rude, but deep down he is an extremely respectable guy and him calling the others Senpai shows it. There is no real way to translate that in a way that doesn't sound weird in English.

Now look at Teddie and him calling you sensei, Seeing as how Teddie views Yu as a mentor he calls him as such. In English You can say He is my mentor, but you would not refer to your mentor as simply "Mentor." Then there's also how he addresses Nanako as Nana-Chan. Nana doesn't roll off the tongue and it isn't exactly a cutesy name in English. In general I would assume that a cutesy name for Nanako would be difficult to find. hence the Use of Chan.

For all intents and purposes, they are building an atmosphere by using the honorifics. They want you to feel as close to the Japanese country side as possible.
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#32DrakillionPosted 1/26/2013 11:40:16 PM
I think it would make it slightly worse, as in a "1% less enjoyable" worse.

I like my character being called, Sensei and Senpai, ESPECIALLY Senpai. Why? Because it sounds cool.

Plus, I have sweet spots for Yukiko, Kanji and Teddie. I always liked calling them Yuki-chan/tan, Kanji-sama, and Teddie-kun, respectively.
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#33mistermikeymikePosted 1/26/2013 11:46:17 PM
perfectchaos83 posted...
That's the point of localization. This isn't Japanese, it's English. Finding a workaround is the point, the script writers are just lazy.

There's a difference between bad localization and design choice. If it were, say, a Final Fantasy game with honorifics, I would say it is lazy localization. In this game you essentially live the life of a Japanese High School Student with part of the story heavily based upon your relationship with others. Look at Kanji for example, he looks all tough and rude, but deep down he is an extremely respectable guy and him calling the others Senpai shows it. There is no real way to translate that in a way that doesn't sound weird in English.

Now look at Teddie and him calling you sensei, Seeing as how Teddie views Yu as a mentor he calls him as such. In English You can say He is my mentor, but you would not refer to your mentor as simply "Mentor." Then there's also how he addresses Nanako as Nana-Chan. Nana doesn't roll off the tongue and it isn't exactly a cutesy name in English. In general I would assume that a cutesy name for Nanako would be difficult to find. hence the Use of Chan.

For all intents and purposes, they are building an atmosphere by using the honorifics. They want you to feel as close to the Japanese country side as possible.


honestly the kanji thing can be done with how they speak. if you wanted kanji to be a thug he would speak like a stereotypical thug

as for nanako you can easily change nanakos name to something that flows off the tongue easy. like nancy or something.
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#34Kite91Posted 1/26/2013 11:49:26 PM
mistermikeymike posted...
perfectchaos83 posted...
That's the point of localization. This isn't Japanese, it's English. Finding a workaround is the point, the script writers are just lazy.

There's a difference between bad localization and design choice. If it were, say, a Final Fantasy game with honorifics, I would say it is lazy localization. In this game you essentially live the life of a Japanese High School Student with part of the story heavily based upon your relationship with others. Look at Kanji for example, he looks all tough and rude, but deep down he is an extremely respectable guy and him calling the others Senpai shows it. There is no real way to translate that in a way that doesn't sound weird in English.

Now look at Teddie and him calling you sensei, Seeing as how Teddie views Yu as a mentor he calls him as such. In English You can say He is my mentor, but you would not refer to your mentor as simply "Mentor." Then there's also how he addresses Nanako as Nana-Chan. Nana doesn't roll off the tongue and it isn't exactly a cutesy name in English. In general I would assume that a cutesy name for Nanako would be difficult to find. hence the Use of Chan.

For all intents and purposes, they are building an atmosphere by using the honorifics. They want you to feel as close to the Japanese country side as possible.


honestly the kanji thing can be done with how they speak. if you wanted kanji to be a thug he would speak like a stereotypical thug

as for nanako you can easily change nanakos name to something that flows off the tongue easy. like nancy or something.


Nancy hardly makes sense.
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#35mmike265Posted 1/26/2013 11:51:51 PM
Weird in the beginning, but you will learn to used with the honorific. After that, it isn't so bad. Oh btw, did they took the honorific off for anime dub? I only watched one episode, and I couldn't hear any of the character talk with honorific.
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#36SicianPosted 1/26/2013 11:53:35 PM
How would they handle MC though? Partner by everyone? Older student guy? He is 'you', after all, and has no set name. Honorifics are there so the characters don't have to address you by name.
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#37Kite91Posted 1/26/2013 11:56:53 PM
Also, all their names are in Japanese. It doesn't sound odd when they say each others names?
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#38perfectchaos83Posted 1/26/2013 11:59:19 PM
honestly the kanji thing can be done with how they speak. if you wanted kanji to be a thug he would speak like a stereotypical thug

Here's a line I'll use as an example. "GO TO TOWN, SENPAI!" Despite how he says it, there is still a semblance of respect there.If you were to remove the honorifics, you could use; man, dude, guy, etc. None of which really show his respect for the Protag.

as for nanako you can easily change nanakos name to something that flows off the tongue easy. like nancy or something.

Nancy? Really? You've got someone surrounded by people with Japanese names and you think Nancy makes sense given the context of the setting? What the hell?
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#39FScellPosted 1/27/2013 12:14:24 AM
Sician posted...
How would they handle MC though? Partner by everyone? Older student guy? He is 'you', after all, and has no set name. Honorifics are there so the characters don't have to address you by name.


I think they should handle by giving the character a name and killing silent protagonists.
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#40SolKarellenPosted 1/27/2013 12:22:43 AM
FScell posted...
Sician posted...
How would they handle MC though? Partner by everyone? Older student guy? He is 'you', after all, and has no set name. Honorifics are there so the characters don't have to address you by name.


I think they should handle by giving the character a name and killing silent protagonists.


This ain't Chrono Trigger, Golden Sun, or Pokemon. There's actually a reason for him to be silent, as an avatar for the player and as a representative of The Fool (Endless Possibilitie). Meaning that he can take any form he wants. ATLUS does well in this regard.

For an honorific example outside of Persona 4, there's an anime where the main villain is a bloodthirsty, psychopathic who just absolutely loves carnage but has a bit of suave-ness to it.

After capturing the main character's love interest, he refers to her as Kana-chan. -Chan is a suffix added to things usually seen as "cute" like an adorable younger sibling (Nanako), or is used between two female friends. But having a villain who wants to kill her out of some perverted love triangle use it? That's rather unsettling. (He literally says word for word that he wanted to kill the male protagonist and screw his corpse and that she was getting in the way). It adds a massive creepiness to his character, and would be harder to translate as intended into English.
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