discussion: is Chrom the worst unit in the game?

#71smash fanaticPosted 6/14/2013 2:01:15 AM
IlluminaZer0 posted...
smash fanatic posted...
Only in the earlygame. Towards the mid and especially the lategame where the game just throws massive waves of enemies at you, the lead unit will be the tankier of the support pair and the support unit will have problems switching in.

I'm just making comment at how their may be more variety than the term implies. There are reasons to have a non-tanky Sumia take point from experience:

1) Finishing off a unit, it's safe and you want to maximize mobility for another task
2) Her husband has crap RES (Like Chrom) and you want to bait them into attacking Sumia so that you can kill them with counter-attacks (esp viable with dual strike)
3) You realize that Chrom + Beastkiller/Rapier is capable of killing a unit safely, and decide to just throw Javelins to allow Chrom to exploit the type weaknesses. (This is especially if you are using Rescue Staff as a substitute for Galeforce)

From the way the term is thrown around, I'm pretty much left with the impression that the majority of players simply use their support pair-up partner as "primary unit steroids" and don't consider other potential utility.

Besides, having a toughened pair-up partner is ideal simply because it allows them to actually do dual strike damage.


All those things are usually less important than being able to tank waves of enemies.

When constructing a team, I don't know about you, but my anchor point are the units I want to be tanking for the playthrough, because the most important thing is to make sure you don't die. Doing all the cute things like "maximizing mobility" and "attacking safely at range" come afterwards.
---
But know that you are disagreeing with someone who is probably more experienced with optimization in video games than you. - MAtt5TER
#72IlluminaZer0Posted 6/14/2013 2:34:16 AM(edited)
smash fanatic posted...
All those things are usually less important than being able to tank waves of enemies.

When constructing a team, I don't know about you, but my anchor point are the units I want to be tanking for the playthrough, because the most important thing is to make sure you don't die. Doing all the cute things like "maximizing mobility" and "attacking safely at range" come afterwards.

In many maps (such as the seemingly infamous Ch 16) you don't need to tank the entire wave of enemies due to how open the map is. You can slowly withdraw while dictating whom is going to attack whom. Having to fight "swarms" is rarely necessary with even moderate tactical aptitude.

This is a big part of the reason why I find complaints of the map being open absurd. It actually helps you dictate the pace of the fight, in giving you maneuverability against brain dead AI.

You don't really need many tanks, having a high number of (true, dedicated) tanks is contrary to their purpose. It's one of the reasons I find such concepts as making everyone a Sorcerer fundamentally absurd. And with the former mentioned approach, a lead unit can still function fine even if they are only engaging say, 1-3 enemies on that turn.

--- Personal style quip ---

And if you are comfortable with the pair-up --> exchange commands, you can frequently use the increased number of unit actions to completely wipe out a group of enemies within the player phase even without such tools as Galeforce.
---
Official claimant of Mem Aleph for the theoretic cause of promoting Shin Megami Tensei IV of the 3DS.
#73banjo kazooiePosted 6/14/2013 2:28:47 AM
Even my MU did a pittance of damage against Lunatic Grima when I got there. Chrom is very useful in that he has effective damage on the final boss.
---
That's strange because reading it gave me Shonen level powers, a spiked hair cut, and Lupus. - SwordMasterEX