Post some tips for earning coins in MUT

#1shinythingsPosted 9/30/2012 10:39:10 AM
Been trying to find a good way of making coins but outside of spending real money haven't found much. Here's what I've done, share yours.

1) Play regular season solo challenge games. The early games are short, easy and make at least 500 coins per game. Perfect if you're just starting out.
If you complete an entire schedule then you get a key pack which is just a rare card used to complete sets. I got a Deion Sanders key card and sold that for 59,000 coins.

2) Play the legend challenges. You have to have a team rating of 85 to do these (I got my team up there by using that Deion Sanders card to purchase a couple legendary packs). These games are harder and longer but pay off 3000 coins per.

3) Play online. This might be the least efficient way of doing things I think. You're playing a longer game and making around 900 coins (this depends on how poorly/well you do) for a win. However, it's still fun to check out other players teams and get a decent challenge. Unfortunately most of the people I play aren't very good/run the same two plays/go for it every fourth down.

4) Work the auctions. Buy low, sell high. I haven't had many positive results this way but I'm sure it can be done. If you're just starting out and come across an important collection card, sell that to purchase gold and legendary packs to improve your team.

So that has been a result of my experiences and I'm not saying this is one percent the best way of doing things. This is just what I have been doing. Feel free to make some suggestions and post your own experiences.
---
:)
#2a_hicks58Posted 10/1/2012 9:17:41 PM
The preseason games are just as good as the regular season games for coin farming. For four games (all quick and easy) you get a total of 1550 coins plus a rookie pack. The low level cards in the rookie pack are useful so you don't have to burn your premier cards/contracts extensions for easy solo challenges, plus every now and then you get a valuable card.
#3a_hicks58Posted 10/6/2012 12:40:27 AM
I found another trick, but it's ethically dubious. Say you have some card that typically auctions for about 500-1500 coins. Auction it with a starting big of around 500 coins, but a buyout of 11,111 coins. Since the numeral "1" is much narrower than the digits 0 and 2-9, the width of 11,111 as it appears on the screen looks like it should be only four digits long, i.e. 1,111 coins. Often you can catch some poor sap who isn't paying attention, and he'll buy it out for ten times what he meant to, I suppose this could also work for cards that auction in the 5,000-20,000 range (and posting a buyout of 111,111), but I haven;t gotten any cards that valuable yet.
#4SharkwalkerPosted 10/6/2012 5:55:28 AM
a_hicks58 posted...
I found another trick, but it's ethically dubious. Say you have some card that typically auctions for about 500-1500 coins. Auction it with a starting big of around 500 coins, but a buyout of 11,111 coins. Since the numeral "1" is much narrower than the digits 0 and 2-9, the width of 11,111 as it appears on the screen looks like it should be only four digits long, i.e. 1,111 coins. Often you can catch some poor sap who isn't paying attention, and he'll buy it out for ten times what he meant to, I suppose this could also work for cards that auction in the 5,000-20,000 range (and posting a buyout of 111,111), but I haven;t gotten any cards that valuable yet.



That is actually a crime called moral terpitude..... Can be tried as a felon if anyone you did that to decided to go to their local attorney general and press charges. Grant it I doubt anyone would, but lets say they do. Then the FBI gets a warrant to investigate EA's servers they see what IP addy you use to connect to the server, trace it to your real addy, then send the FBI from there to arrest you.

I suppose it does come down to if those cards and coins have real world value. Ebay, and EA seem to think they do.

I for one, think people doing this are narcissistic a-holes....
#5a_hicks58Posted 10/10/2012 12:11:45 AM
Interesting. I would love the see the section of federal law that this practice is violating.

Also, moral turpitude (note the correct spelling) is not a crime; it is a vague term used to describe a category of crimes, namely ones that are contrary to community standards of justice, honesty, or good morals.

I grant that (actual) fraud is widely considered a crime of moral turpitude, but this hardly fits the bill. Here's the definition from the legal section of thefreedictionary.com:

"A false representation of a matter of fact—whether by words or by conduct, by false or misleading allegations, or by concealment of what should have been disclosed—that deceives and is intended to deceive another so that the individual will act upon it to her or his legal injury."

Selecting a buyout price that is difficult to read does not meet the criteria, because there there is no false representation. The correct price is clearly listed for all to see, but some people don't pay attention.

This practice is actually pretty common (did you think it was a coincidence that so many bid/buyout prices are a string of 1's?). The FBI would be busy indeed if it were to investigate all of these. The practice is not illegal just because you think people who do it are narcissistic (which btw means vain or conceited--not sure that's the word you were going for).

So it's clearly not illegal, but is it ethical? That's for everyone to decide for themselves. I certainly can see how someone who falls for it might be upset; I said from the beginning that this was in an ethical gray area. As far as morality goes, IMHO Jesus of Nazareth laid out the simplest and most elegant ethical system ever devised with his Golden Rule: "Do unto others if as you would have them do unto you."

I personally take no offense when I view an auction with 11,111 as the buyout price, so I have no qualms with performing the trick myself. As for the unhappy buyers, I hope that it is a mistake they do not repeat. It is important to carefully read any agreement one enters into, and it is better that they learn the lesson where only Madden coins are at stake than when they buy their first house or car. (Coincidentally, I was rooked out $2,000 when I bought my first car because the price on the contract was not the price I negotiated. I wish I had learned that lesson earlier than I did. That is a case of actual--although in my case improvable--fraud).
#6SharkwalkerPosted 10/10/2012 5:33:27 AM
Let me preface this by saying if you are the aforementioned poster do not waste your time reading this unless you want to get into some boring legal terms.

I purposely mispell <--- (exhibit A) words. See the following mark twain quote to understand why. Now that said red herring is out of the way.

"I don't see any use in having a uniform and arbitrary way of spelling words. We might as well make all clothes alike and cook all dishes alike. Sameness is tiresome; variety is pleasing. I have a correspondent whose letters are always a refreshment to me, there is such a breezy unfettered originality about his orthography. He always spells Kow with a large K. Now that is just as good as to spell it with a small one. It is better. It gives the imagination a broader field, a wider scope. It suggests to the mind a grand, vague, impressive new kind of a cow."

As far as moral terpitude <---note incorrect spelling ;P. a C.I.M.T. (Crime Involving Moral Terpitude <--- oh shnap did it again) which is defined as a legal concept that refers to conduct that is considered contrary to community standards of justice, honesty or good morals in nearly every legal dictionary. Usually goes on to say something to the effect of defining the categories you mentioned. Your patricular <-- (dang another mispelling. <--and another...) situation would be a crime against property. EA has already established that the coins and cards in the game are property, although it is currently being debated if EA should own all the cards and coins everyone in the game has or if individuals own their own cards and should be allowed to resell them via means like ebay. (actually an interesting case).

Since it has already legally been established that coins and cards are property lets then look at what determines a crime against property on the grounds of Moral Turpitude <-- (hey did it right that time). I know this is commonly called fraud as you have explained but lets breakdown different types of Fraud which again is a CIMT for others who read this.

1. Making a false representation (in regards to price/quality of property one is selling) You are doing this!

2. Knowledge that you are in misrepresenting. This whole thread is evidenced by this.

3. Reliance on the fact that the person your taking advantage of will misunderstand your representation. You have also admitted to this.

One component of fraud is the concept "Evil Intent". In other words not only would you have to commit one of the above acts you have to do it with one of the following intents to be a CIMT instead of normal Fraud;

1. Arson
2. Burglary
3. False Pretenses

There are actually a lot more but I will stop at 3. You again have admitted to false pretenses, false representation, knowledge of false representation and reliance on people misunderstanding your false representation in the sale of virtual property, which has again already been established as being real property in the case of MUT cards/coins.

This is easily classified as Fraud (as you have stated) and Fraud under a CIMT as I have. Any judge would agree with me as they simply have to see the written law establishing the cards/coins to be property to be able to decide if this was a crime there-against. The big question is would they still consider it a felony as most CIMT are, or would they be more lenient do to it being virtual property.

Either way, what a dishonest and worthless person it takes to purposely take advantage of others in this manner. I imagine a 7 year old struggling through games to save some coins to buy a card of their favorite player for lets say 30,000 or more and decide to by a 1,111 coin card of someone on their favorite team in the mean time only to find out that they are down 10,000 more than what they thought. Can you imagine how disheartening that would be for them.

Seriously what a worthless person it takes.
#7SharkwalkerPosted 10/10/2012 7:25:32 AM
Also, narcissism can simply mean selfishness under some definitions, and is commonly used that way, which is how I chose to use it. I know there are plenty of papers about narcissists being selfish but not all selfish people being narcissists and so on, and am really not up to debate the meaning of a word as I recently been in a court room where 5 lawyers debated the meaning of the word adjecent for nearly 3 months. Now the state supreme court gets to decide that (although other state's courts already have and I'm sure they'll just adopt that definition that others have accepted....) I digress.

Just really not interested in arguing as we could argue word meanings, the importance of spelling, CIMTs, ethics and everything all day w/o either of us agreeing with the other.

The only point I wanted to make in my original post is realize that if someone really wanted to, they could bring legal action against another for the "11,111 trick". Legally they would have the grounds to win assuming that the virtual property belongs to individuals and not to EA. How the case would play out I have no idea, but I think too few people behind a computer screen have no moral code and do many things they wouldn't even dream of doing in real life.
#8JPZetrickPosted 10/10/2012 9:38:22 AM
I invented ummm...the jet pack. I was gonna invent a skrateboard but I already have 500 of them so I was like vwhuhoo forget it. I'll just make a flying surfboard instead with a jet ski engine on it. I have about 150 jet skis. Just ride'em around in the ocean or in a pond,
---
"...Before I could, they hit me on the hod, and I pissed out." - Officer Crabtree