Real Talk: The reason EA has tons of DRM in games is because you people PIRATE

#211SuperrpgmanPosted 3/8/2013 11:42:24 PM
Here's a bit of reality for you:

Everyone who has found a real, pirated version of this game were able to play it on day 1, BS free!

Thousands of people who bought this legitimately still haven't been able to play this because of the BS that EA has done! It's gotten so bad that Amazon stopped selling digital copies of the game, because they realize that EA is screwing people over, making piracy literally their only choice! And what does EA do in response? Why they completely dick with those asking for refunds via customer support, and use it as an excuse to be EVER MORE ban happy with Origin accounts!

Am I for piracy? Not really, but in situations like this, I sure as hell bloody understand it!

When a company tries to stop piracy by punishing those who are loyal to it, i don't see how anyone can see this as a pure black and white situation!
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#212machetemanPosted 3/9/2013 12:00:19 AM
From: Superrpgman | #211
Here's a bit of reality for you:

Everyone who has found a real, pirated version of this game were able to play it on day 1, BS free!

There is no cracked version of this game. Dose of reality for ya.

Diablo 3 has been out for over a year and there is still no working crack for that game. The games share the same kind of DRM.
#213Foxxie_kunPosted 3/9/2013 12:13:23 AM
Correlation does not imply causation, and this chain is a relatively long chain of cause and effect.

Back before the internet, gamers had only word of mouth and marketing sources (Including magazine publications) to gauge the value of games on, but more often than not games were made to the utmost in quality because of it being a niche entertainment medium.

There wasn't a major amount of money in the video game market at first, since it was predominantly a children's entertainment medium.

As technology advanced, the internet, 16-bit graphics, etc. were developed. The further gaming came as an art/entertainment form, the more profit could be made from it. There have always been bootleg games for every console, after all, but it came to getting blank cartridges/disks, and copying the data to them.

Now that gaming is more business than art-form due to the amount of potential profit per investment dollar for the publishers, they wish to protect their IPs by using copy protection. The earliest forms of copy protection are actually manuals with color-coded activation keys in the back cover. What many publishers fail to see is that you need to balance protecting your investment and being able to please your end consumer without undue inconvenience, something Ubisoft and EA have shown in recent years to have forgotten.

Now look at companies that are flourishing, such as Valve and CD Projekt Red; They use reasonable DRM with valid additional features that don't feel like an inconvenience or hassle. Hell, Steam has quickly become the single largest digital game distribution method in history, and makes keeping up with guilds/clans/friends and joining their games easier than ever. CD Projekt Red owns Good Old Games, as well as makes the great The Witcher series and the upcoming Witcher 3: Wild Hunt and Cyberpunk 2077, both of which I will gladly prepurchase as soon as they're available to on steam.

EA however, utilizes DRM/EULA tactics that are borderline illegal (Though they find loopholes), such as being able to ban you from playing any game they have tied to your account due to actions on forums, in-game, or if their Origin client finds suspicious software on your computer. The always online DRM isn't that bad in some ways, but to force single-player games to have an online connection constantly phoning home is just silly, and I wouldn't be surprised if they can use certain things you do to close your account.

Protecting your investment is a sound idea, but you need to balance that with consumer convenience and hassle.
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#214king_maddenPosted 3/9/2013 2:08:45 PM
to the uninformed here, there are NO WORKING PIRATED versions, its pretty much like D3, there really isnt a good crack out for that one either.

I know people keep saying DRM like this makes people pirate the game more, but DRM like this is pretty much the only to get fewer people to NOT pirate their game. the problem here is EA is having server issues so its messing them up more than anything.

you make a great game with no DRM, and some will buy it, and some will pirate it.

make a great game with DRM like this and some will buy it and much fewer will pirate it.

the majority of gamers who buy games will buy it regardless, since the DRM doesnt normally affect them. games with DRM can sell a lot, just like games that dont have it, only difference is one will be pirated more than the other. games with no DRM are pirated sometimes before the game is even released, or a few hours later. there are games with decent DRM thats still hard to get pirated.

only the "elite" online community, tend to take it as a personal attack.
#215MysticB121Posted 3/9/2013 2:17:07 PM
SimCity Online =/= Diablo III Online. Stop comparing the two.

Diablo III is in real time on the servers. Enemies, skills, items, EVERYTHING is shared the moment it happens to everyone on the server.

Sim City shares data ever (x) minutes. (Not sure exactly how long but its sure not every second.) You cannot go to your neighbors city and see what they are doing in Real Time. You load it, check it out, and leave. Reloading it will show what they have done while you were there.

Also, if you go back to the region and load another city, the game doesn't even show the data on the city you have been working on till the server refreshes minutes later. The sync is extremely slow.

Hell, try sending yourself a gift of cash and watch how long it takes to send to your other city.
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#216king_maddenPosted 3/9/2013 4:53:18 PM
MysticB121 posted...
SimCity Online =/= Diablo III Online. Stop comparing the two.

Diablo III is in real time on the servers. Enemies, skills, items, EVERYTHING is shared the moment it happens to everyone on the server.

Sim City shares data ever (x) minutes. (Not sure exactly how long but its sure not every second.) You cannot go to your neighbors city and see what they are doing in Real Time. You load it, check it out, and leave. Reloading it will show what they have done while you were there.

Also, if you go back to the region and load another city, the game doesn't even show the data on the city you have been working on till the server refreshes minutes later. The sync is extremely slow.

Hell, try sending yourself a gift of cash and watch how long it takes to send to your other city.



I was just comparing the DRM measures, not the games themselves.

of course thats if you were talking to me. lol
#217mbisonPosted 3/9/2013 5:05:37 PM
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2012/05/18/the-truth-is-it-doesnt-work-cd-projekt-on-drm/

'The Truth Is, It Doesn't Work' - CD Projekt On DRM
22 comments, 20 called-out
Comment Now
Follow Comments

The travails of Diablo III have put digital rights management high on the hate list of many gamers – a position it rarely slips from, it must be said. In order to fight piracy (and protect the integrity of the new auction house, where players can sell their surplus loot to each other, with Blizzard taking a cut of every transaction), Diablo III insists on a constant Internet connection to play. So, when the servers were misbehaving during the game’s launch, early adopters could not even practise in the single-player mode.
The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

CD Projekt have had their own issues with piracy – according to their estimates, 4.5 million copies of their latest game have been circulated. Having abandoned DRM as a means of preventing piracy, they experimented briefly with the RIAA approach of sending letters to suspected pirates, but abandoned the strategy after a public backlash, despite maintaining that they could accurately identify pirated copies, and thus no legitimate player was being contacted.

There is an interesting detail to this story. Like all GOG.com games, the version of The Witcher 2 released in 2011 shipped without DRM – pirating it would have been little more complex than sharing the file. However, it was also published in the US as a boxed, on-disc game by Atari. This version shipped with SecuROM copy protection. “Most people in the gaming industry were convinced that the first version of the game to be pirated would be the GOG version (as it was DRM-free), while in the end it was the retail version, which shipped with DRM,” notes GOG.com’s Managing Director, Guillaume Rambourg.

I asked Rambourg to confirm not only that CD Projekt Red no longer used DRM, but that the GOG.com downloader used to download games sold through CD Projekt’s digital channel did not monitor usage or report back to an authentication or verification system.

Read the whole article here:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2012/05/18/the-truth-is-it-doesnt-work-cd-projekt-on-drm/
#218SuperrpgmanPosted 3/9/2013 6:55:19 PM
mbison posted...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2012/05/18/the-truth-is-it-doesnt-work-cd-projekt-on-drm/

'The Truth Is, It Doesn't Work' - CD Projekt On DRM
22 comments, 20 called-out
Comment Now
Follow Comments

The travails of Diablo III have put digital rights management high on the hate list of many gamers – a position it rarely slips from, it must be said. In order to fight piracy (and protect the integrity of the new auction house, where players can sell their surplus loot to each other, with Blizzard taking a cut of every transaction), Diablo III insists on a constant Internet connection to play. So, when the servers were misbehaving during the game’s launch, early adopters could not even practise in the single-player mode.
The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

CD Projekt have had their own issues with piracy – according to their estimates, 4.5 million copies of their latest game have been circulated. Having abandoned DRM as a means of preventing piracy, they experimented briefly with the RIAA approach of sending letters to suspected pirates, but abandoned the strategy after a public backlash, despite maintaining that they could accurately identify pirated copies, and thus no legitimate player was being contacted.

There is an interesting detail to this story. Like all GOG.com games, the version of The Witcher 2 released in 2011 shipped without DRM – pirating it would have been little more complex than sharing the file. However, it was also published in the US as a boxed, on-disc game by Atari. This version shipped with SecuROM copy protection. “Most people in the gaming industry were convinced that the first version of the game to be pirated would be the GOG version (as it was DRM-free), while in the end it was the retail version, which shipped with DRM,” notes GOG.com’s Managing Director, Guillaume Rambourg.

I asked Rambourg to confirm not only that CD Projekt Red no longer used DRM, but that the GOG.com downloader used to download games sold through CD Projekt’s digital channel did not monitor usage or report back to an authentication or verification system.

Read the whole article here:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2012/05/18/the-truth-is-it-doesnt-work-cd-projekt-on-drm/


I've said it before, and I'll say it again.

CD Projekt is freaking awesome, in every single way! Can't wait to reserve Cyperpunk on gog.com!
---
Project Beat a Game a Day, along with my Daily NES Archive:
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/563947-a-view-to-a-kill
#219king_maddenPosted 3/9/2013 8:41:30 PM
mbison posted...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2012/05/18/the-truth-is-it-doesnt-work-cd-projekt-on-drm/

'The Truth Is, It Doesn't Work' - CD Projekt On DRM
22 comments, 20 called-out
Comment Now
Follow Comments

The travails of Diablo III have put digital rights management high on the hate list of many gamers – a position it rarely slips from, it must be said. In order to fight piracy (and protect the integrity of the new auction house, where players can sell their surplus loot to each other, with Blizzard taking a cut of every transaction), Diablo III insists on a constant Internet connection to play. So, when the servers were misbehaving during the game’s launch, early adopters could not even practise in the single-player mode.
The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings

CD Projekt have had their own issues with piracy – according to their estimates, 4.5 million copies of their latest game have been circulated. Having abandoned DRM as a means of preventing piracy, they experimented briefly with the RIAA approach of sending letters to suspected pirates, but abandoned the strategy after a public backlash, despite maintaining that they could accurately identify pirated copies, and thus no legitimate player was being contacted.

There is an interesting detail to this story. Like all GOG.com games, the version of The Witcher 2 released in 2011 shipped without DRM – pirating it would have been little more complex than sharing the file. However, it was also published in the US as a boxed, on-disc game by Atari. This version shipped with SecuROM copy protection. “Most people in the gaming industry were convinced that the first version of the game to be pirated would be the GOG version (as it was DRM-free), while in the end it was the retail version, which shipped with DRM,” notes GOG.com’s Managing Director, Guillaume Rambourg.

I asked Rambourg to confirm not only that CD Projekt Red no longer used DRM, but that the GOG.com downloader used to download games sold through CD Projekt’s digital channel did not monitor usage or report back to an authentication or verification system.

Read the whole article here:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnyegriffiths/2012/05/18/the-truth-is-it-doesnt-work-cd-projekt-on-drm/



just a side question, how do they know which was pirated first? Also isnt it more important which was pirated more? with pirating though, if there is a security measure people tend to try to go after that one first, because the one without it will require little to no effort to pirate.
#220Dragon NexusPosted 3/9/2013 8:54:31 PM
From: Superrpgman | #218
I've said it before, and I'll say it again.

CD Projekt is freaking awesome, in every single way! Can't wait to reserve Cyperpunk on gog.com!


Thing is, the retail version had the DRM patched out within the first week of release.
The game is pirated and bundled with cracking software it doesn't need. CD Projekt Red speculated that it's less about taking something for free, and more about being the guy to sign his or her username on a piece of cracking software saying "Made By 1337h4x0rD3m0n 2011" and distributing it.

I'll say it again, the pirated retail copy of the game would have erased its own DRM once it was patched. Even the CD-Key screen could by bypassed by just typing anything into the box.

Not only that, but all of their DLC has been free, their patches are sizable and add content, and all of the pre-order DLC was available as a free download within weeks of the game's release.

So yeah, CD Projekt Red are freakin awesome developers who really give a damn about their customers and about gamers as a whole. And thank god they've recently said they're not willing to sell. Let's hope we don't get a Bioware situation where someone buys them up through the back door, nabbing a parent company or something.
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