So now the DLC plan has expanded to buying toothpaste in real life?!?!

#21Bossdog421Posted 4/17/2013 11:00:55 AM
Wow haters on this board are kind of sad. They obviously know nothing of marketing or running a business.

Businesses can not make everyone happy, businesses try to make money. Businesses will try to appeal to the masses, the fact that a few hardcores get upset with some decisions does not hurt them.

This game is a success, QQ more
#22SoulTrapperPosted 4/17/2013 11:10:22 AM
I updated it to make it more readable and added Darkace's suggestions.

1994: EA pressures Bullfrog to rush Ultima VIII: Pagan. Richard Garriott claims the game was "forcibly badly slashed & shipped", "cutting out huge swathes of the game all the way to the point where the cloth map was completely unrelated to the map of the real game because we threw out so many bits and pieces of it." The resulting game was viewed by series fans as a disappointment.

1995 - EA pressures Bullfrog to rush Magic Carpet II to market over the objections of Peter Molyneux, resulting in a buggy game.

1998 - EA acquires Westwood Studios. Many Westwood employees quit in protest.

1998 - EA acquires Virgin Interactive. Remember them? They used to make games based on Disney movies, as well as that 7up Cool Spot game. Well, they used to. They were currently working on an anticipated and controversial game called Thrill Kill. When EA acquired Virgin, they declared Thrill Kill too violent to be released, and killed it. They wouldn't even sell the game to another publisher, either.

1999 - EA pressures Origin Systems to cut corners and rush Ultima IX: Ascension to market, over the objections of the development team, resulting in a buggy game that many fans felt was unfinished. How did EA respond to the game's poor reception? They canceled all of Origin's planned projects and forced the developer to relocate, despite that many of their employees couldn't due to their family. Origin Systems limped on until 2004 when it died. Did you like the Ultima, Wing Commander, or Jane's Flight Sim series? Sucks to be you. Wing Commander hasn't existed since (save for Wing Commander Arena, which is nothing like the earlier games), and the only Ultima games released were a few Free to Play titles.

1999 - After being one of Sega's staunchest supporters for years, EA shows the Sega Dreamcast virtually zero attention. If you got a Dreamcast and were hoping to enjoy EA's latest big game, you were probably out of luck.

2000 - Westwood Studios' Nox, which was intended to be a multiplayer magical combat game inspired by Gauntlet, Magic the Gathering and Mortal Kombat, was released as a straightforward RPG at EA's insistence. But, hey! The game still turned out pretty good! Then EA got the IP rights to the game and removed server support for it, killing it.

2001 - EA closes developer Kesmai. Did you like the Air Warrior game series? Sucks to be you.

2001 - Bullfrog Studios merges with EA UK and is essentially shut down. Did you like the Populous, Theme Park, or Syndicate series? Sucks to be you. No more games in these series have been released (aside from handheld ports).

2002 - EA pushes for long-running strategy series Command and Conquer to be made into an FPS for some reason, resulting in Command And Conquer: Renegade. When the game bombed, EA shut down Westwood Studios.

2004 - EA closes Maxis's Walnut Creek studios and integrated them into EA's Redwood City offices. Maxis's logo was subsequently seen minimized increasingly more on their own products as EA's branding took over. EA also meddled with the products' development, naturally.

2004 - Multiple EA employees sue EA for forcing them to work long hours without overtime pay. EA settled the lawsuit for $30 million.
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PSN: El_Coon
#23SoulTrapperPosted 4/17/2013 11:10:26 AM
2004 - EA signs an exclusive deal with the NFL, the NCAA, and just to make things complete, the Arena Football League. This means, for all intents and purposes, that they are the only company that can release major football games. I mean, other developers could, but what would the point be, when consumers clearly prefer the actual teams and players? Not only did this give EA what amounts to a monopoly, but it killed the NFL 2K series, NCAA Football 2K series, and NFL Fever series. Did you like those games? Sucks to be you.

2006 - In Need For Speed: Carbon, EA tested the waters of charging players to not play their game. Players can pay money to unlock cars that are already in the game, instead of unlocking them the standard way. Later games in the series would continue to include this as well.

2008 - Spore gets shipped with SecuROM, a DRM software that limits the number of times you could install the game, despite that nowhere in the game's box or instructions are players notified of the software being present. It could've been worse, though - they were originally going to require that the game re-authenticate online every 10 days. On top of all of that, the game leaves files on the computer even after it is uninstalled. This has led to multiple class action lawsuits. Needless to say, all of this was over the objections of creator Will Wright.

2008 - Burnout Paradise gets DLC that gives gamers who pay an advantage against others. Additionally, the Big Surf Island expansion alters menus and stuff even if players haven't bought it, leading to menu selections that players can't use without getting a sales pitch for the expansion.

2009 - EA used NCAA players' likenesses in their games without the players' permission

2009 - Dragon-Age Origins adds a character into your camp who tries to sell you the expansion in-game. Because nothing helps to create immersion like a sales pitch for more game content!

2009 - EA closes Pandemic Studios. Did you like the Mercenaries, Full Spectrum Warrior, Star Wars: Battlefront, or Destroy All Humans series? Sucks to be you.

2009 - Madden NFL 10 nickels and dimes gamers with its Madden Ultimate Team mode.

2009 - NCAA 10's dynasty accelerators gave players with bigger wallets a way to bribe their way to get advantages over other players.

2009 - Changes to Battlefield Heroes in 2009 ensured that players essentially have to open their wallets to get better guns if they want to remain competitive.

2009 - The Sims 3 releases with a bunch of optional for-pay content on day one, very likely withheld from the game to make an extra buck.

2010 - EA removed the ability to play as the Taliban in Medal of Honor, an otherwise forgettable FPS, despite that it made sense in the context of the game's setting and story. So I guess EA's artistic integrity is clearly expendable if it runs into controversy, as long as that controversy isn't coming from actual gamers.

2011 - "Your Mom Hates Dead Space 2" ad campaign. ~sigh~

2011 - EA pushes Bioware to rush Dragon Age II for release over the objections of developers. The result was a piss poor sequel.

2011 - Star Wars: The Old Republic was rushed to release. Many complained that the game was lacking in content.

2012 - About half a year after releasing Battlefield 3, EA shuts down most of its servers. This forced players who wished to continue playing to pay for their own servers (costing $25/month per server), opened the door for server admin abuse, and made it virtually impossible to find a server running 100% tickets on a full rotation of maps.
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PSN: El_Coon
#24anonymous46773Posted 4/17/2013 11:12:21 AM
Bossdog421 posted...
Wow haters on this board are kind of sad. They obviously know nothing of marketing or running a business.

Businesses can not make everyone happy, businesses try to make money. Businesses will try to appeal to the masses, the fact that a few hardcores get upset with some decisions does not hurt them.

This game is a success, QQ more


You're funny.
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I asked God for a bike, but I know God doesn't work that way. So I stole a bike and asked for forgiveness.
#25SoulTrapperPosted 4/17/2013 11:12:38 AM
2012 - Mass Effect 3's voice acting budget was slashed, causing characters to be cut. Additionally, executive meddling has been accused of being one of the causes for that game's disappointing ending. Oh, also, on-disc DLC. And to get all of the game's in-game expansion content, you're looking at spending $170. Thanks, EA!

2012 - EA forces BioWare (along with the rest of the studios under their umbrella) to integrate multiplayer into Mass Effect 3. Despite promises that this move would not affect those solely interested in the single player campaign, the best ending the only ending in which the main character survives was only obtainable by those who participated in multiplayer.

2013 - The latest Simcity release's "Always-Online" fiasco, with the publisher luring reviewers to write misleading reviews by requiring that early reviews be done in EA's own offices. And then when the servers went down at launch, EA doubled down on claims that the game really, really required that online connectivity and totally wasn't just for DRM purposes (which was almost certainly an outright lie).

2013 - Real Racing 3 is released as F2P, making gamers pay to reduce wait times (instead of just for, you know, actual content).

2013 - EA releases it's first DLC for Simcity: a Nissan advert: Sacrificing game play for quick cash, the recharge station doesn't cost any electricity or labor to opperate and provides free happiness.

2013 - EA terminates Sims Social, Pet Society and SimCity Social on short notice, screwing over players who put money into in-game content only to find that it will soon be unusable.

2013- EA releases it's second DLC for Simcity, available by buying a certain brand of toothpaste.
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PSN: El_Coon
#26MoxRavagerPosted 4/17/2013 11:13:12 AM
Bossdog421 posted...
Wow haters on this board are kind of sad. They obviously know nothing of marketing or running a business.

Businesses can not make everyone happy, businesses try to make money. Businesses will try to appeal to the masses, the fact that a few hardcores get upset with some decisions does not hurt them.

This game is a success, QQ more


13: Provisional (4)
New account with less than 3 karma. Can post 3 topics, 30 messages per day (15 per hour)
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#27darkace77450Posted 4/17/2013 12:20:13 PM
Bossdog421 posted...
Wow haters on this board are kind of sad. They obviously know nothing of marketing or running a business.


Considering they've lost more than $2 billion and 60% of their stock value in the last five years, I'd say neither does EA.
#28Lord_VaderPosted 4/17/2013 1:30:33 PM
darkace77450 posted...
Bossdog421 posted...
Wow haters on this board are kind of sad. They obviously know nothing of marketing or running a business.


Considering they've lost more than $2 billion and 60% of their stock value in the last five years, I'd say neither does EA.


Lmao.
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Live long and prosper.
#29GastroidPosted 4/17/2013 2:49:40 PM(edited)
2002 - EA pushes for long-running strategy series Command and Conquer to be made into an FPS for some reason, resulting in Command And Conquer: Renegade. When the game bombed, EA shut down Westwood Studios.


As much as I dislike EA, this little part isn't the truth. Westwood Studios made Renegade out of their own design, as they ultimately planned for a Command and Conquer MMO using the same engine. The game lacked a lot of polish with less sales than predicted, but a planned sequel to the game based in the Red Alert era (at this point EA was pushing for it to be its own universe with Red Alert 2; the story for that game went against the story for Command and Conquer that Westwood intended before the buyout, but there were efforts to still reconcile it into one coherent story) was planned in order to rectify those faults.

It was the acquisition of DreamWorks Interactive (renamed to EALA) that got Westwood, then merged with other studios to form Westwood Pacific / EA Pacific. EA had EA Pacific operating in Las Vegas and EALA operating in Los Angeles, and EA decided it would be best to operate under one roof since they were relatively close to each other in the grand scheme of things. EALA was much more profitable at the time due to Medal of Honor, so that studio was selected for operations and EA Pacific was shut down, with most of the employees there founding Petroglyph after the layoffs.

Either way, Renegade was all Westwood's decision. That said, though, a far-in-development C&C3 was cancelled when the studio was shut down, the MMO plans were scrapped and Renegade's sequel never saw the light of day. That I can't defend. But Renegade failing to sell well right while EA was making the decision which of the two studios to close was entirely on their shoulders. Westwood didn't have a choice in being a part of EA to begin with, though, since they were a part of Virgin Interactive when it was bought out and Westwood had no say in the deal.
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Fifth Generation Android Unit Series
#30SoulTrapperPosted 4/17/2013 3:22:17 PM
Gastroid posted...
2002 - EA pushes for long-running strategy series Command and Conquer to be made into an FPS for some reason, resulting in Command And Conquer: Renegade. When the game bombed, EA shut down Westwood Studios.


As much as I dislike EA, this little part isn't the truth. Westwood Studios made Renegade out of their own design, as they ultimately planned for a Command and Conquer MMO using the same engine. The game lacked a lot of polish with less sales than predicted, but a planned sequel to the game based in the Red Alert era (at this point EA was pushing for it to be its own universe with Red Alert 2; the story for that game went against the story for Command and Conquer that Westwood intended before the buyout, but there were efforts to still reconcile it into one coherent story) was planned in order to rectify those faults.


Aha, didn't know that. I'll edit it out next time I post.
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PSN: El_Coon